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Publication numberUS2424899 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 29, 1947
Filing dateOct 28, 1944
Priority dateOct 28, 1944
Publication numberUS 2424899 A, US 2424899A, US-A-2424899, US2424899 A, US2424899A
InventorsHenry Priester
Original AssigneeHenry Priester
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Truck hoist
US 2424899 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 29 E947 l H. PRIESTER 2,424,89

TRUCK HOIST Filed oct. 2a, 1944 4 sheets-sheet 1 IN VEN TOR. Henry/Prz'eser vBY .July-2, 1947-. H, PRIESTR 2,424,99

TRUCK HOIST H. PRIESTER July 29, i947.

r:.{RUCK Hors'r Filed Oct. 28, 1944 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 WSN mQm m. W um .Nm E e wm Vi E\ wm \R. m w c Mm, vm Rw P mw l Q@ f Oh A|QQ\ G i .vw mm l A He l o .HNWWI llllllllll Il o l0, O ||||l|.||||||||| OI E r\ |11 l- NR zesses Patented July 29, 1947 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,424,899 TRUCK Hois'r Henry Priester, Middletown, N. Y. Application October 28, 1944, Serial No. 560,129

Claims. 1

This invention relates to traveling cranes.

One of the objects of the invention is to provide a traveling crane whose hoist member is movable without, as well as within, the structural confines of the gauntry.

Another object is the provision of a truckmounted traveling crane whose li'oist member is movable laterally and longitudinally of the truck, the extent of such movement not being limited to the width and length of the truck chassis or body.

A further object is the provision of a truckmounted traveling crane having a traveling gauntry.

Still another object is the provision of a truckmounted traveling crane having extensible gauntry members to endow the hoist member with an increased sphere of activity.

These and other objects are attained by mechanism illustrated in the accompanying drawing in which Figure l is a side view of one embodiment of the invention, shown mounted on a truck;

Figure 2 is a rear or transverse end View of the operative members of said embodiment;

Figure 3` is a partly sectional side view of the hoist member thereof, being a section on the line 3--3 of Figure 4;

Figure 4 is a section on the line 4-4 of Figure 3;

Figure 5 is a side view of another or modified embodiment of the invention, mounted on a truck; l

Figure 6 is a rear or transverse view of the said embodiment;

Figure 7 is a detailed side view of the cranking mechanism of the modified-embodiment;

Figure 8 is a detailed view of the clamping mechanism of said modified embodiment;

Figure 9 is a sectional view of one of the chain locking members of said embodiment;

Figure 10 is a perspective view of said chain locking member;

Figure 1l is a partly sectional view of the hoist member of said'modied embodiment; and

Figure 12 is -a detailed rear View, partly in section, of the cranking mechanism shown in Figure '1.

Although the invention is being described in connection with a motor truck, it may be used, for example, on railroad cars and freight carrying ships and in warehouses.

vReferring to Figures 1 to 4 inclusive, the embodiment of traveling crane there shown comprises a gauntry 29 and fa hoist 30, the gai-in-tryv also shown 'being mounted on a motor truck 49 and the h'oist being carried by a laterally movable trolley 5U, the latter, in turn, rolling on laterally extensible rails 6U which rails in their turn are carried by longitudinally movable trucks 10 mounted on 1ongit'l'idinally extending rails 89.

The gauntry 2|] comprises -four upright columns or postsl2l, a pair of cross beams22 and a pair longitudinally disposed beams which are LI-shaped in cross section and which comprise the aforementioned rails 80. 4

As can be seen in Figures 1, 3 and 4 a pair of trucks 19 'is movably mounted on rails 80, each truck comprising a longitudinally extending Aframe 1| joined to the frame of th'e other truck by means of a pair of rails vor cross beams 1'2 which are U-shaped in cross section-and two `pairs of wheels 13 rotatably -xed to 'said vframe,

and adapted to roll on the lower flanges of rails 80.

A transversely disposed and rotatably mounted axle 14 joins two of the inner wheels of said trucks, said wheels being xedly mounted thereon. Alsoxedly mounted on said axle is a gear wheel 15. A gear chain 16 connects gear wheel 15 to asmaller gear wheel 11 which,in turn, is ii-xedly connected to a sh'eave 18 rotatably mounted on a bracket 19 which is affixed 'to one of the lrails 12. An endless chain is looped around sheave 18. It will be seen that when 'the chain 'is pulled to cause rotation of the sheave, the axle will also rotate together with' the two wheels which -are mounted thereon, thus causing longitudinal movement of the trucks and of the 'entire mechanism carried by the trucks, including the hoist.

A pair of widely spaced, longitudinally extending axles 9| is rotatably iixed to the top portions of cross rails 12. A'small gear wheel 92 is affixed to each of said axles 9|, said gear wheels being situated immediately above one of the extensible rails 60. A sheave 93 is also aiiixed to each said axle and an endless chain 94 is carried by each vvrackgear is engaged by saidgear wheels 92.

It is evident, therefore, that when either of said "chains 94 is pulled to vrotate zthe s'heave'93v on Trolley 50 comprises a frame 5| and two pairs of wheels 52 rotatably amxed thereto. It is to this frame that the hoist 30 is attached and by which it is supported. Also aXed to said frame is a rotatable shaft 53 carrying a gear wheel 54 immediately below, and engaging lower rack gear 63, and a sheave 55 on which is mounted an endless chain 56. It may be seen, in Figure 3, that wheels 52 are adapted to roll in extensible rails 60. It becomes evident, therefore, that when the chain 56 is pulled to rotate sheave 55 and hence shaft 53 and gear wheel 54, movement of trolley 50 along rails 60 is effected.

Carried by trolley 50, as heretofore noted, is hoist 30. A typical hoist is shown in the drawing, including a sheave 3|, an endless chain 32 mounted on the sheave, and a lifting hook 33 at the end of a lifting chain 34. The hoist may be of any desirable type and construction, manually operated or power driven. The same is true of the mechanism previously described: all of it or any part of it may be manually operated or power driven. The motive power may be independently supplied or it may be derived from the engine of the truck.

Referring now to the embodiment of the invention shown in Figures 5 to l2 inclusive, the hoist and all of its transversely movable apparatus are identical with the corresponding equipment above described.

The difference between the two embodiments lies in the fact that in the previously described embodiment there is longitudinal movement of the hoist relative to the gauntry, the latter being in fixed position relative to the truck, whereas in the embodiment of Figures 5 to 12 the hoist l is in xecl position relative to the gauntry, the

gauntry being longitudinally movable relative to the truck. The latter embodiment lacks trucks l and the apparatus associated therewith.

The gauntry |00 of the embodiment of Figures to 12 is smaller longitudinally than the one previously described, and is mounted on Wheels ||0 which roll on longitudinally extensible rails 2, the latter, in turn, being slidably mounted on xed longitudinal rails |30 which are aixed to the chassis of the motor truck. Y

Gauntry |00 comprises four upright girder members |0|, longitudinal beams |02 and transverse beams |03. The mechanism by which the hoist is supported and by which it is enabled to move transversely of the truck, is affixed to said longitudinal beams |02.

Itwill be seen in Figure 12 that extensible rails are H shaped in cross section. It will also be seen in said Figure l2 that pairs of brackets |04 are aixed to the lower ends of girders |0| and that rollers |05 which are rotatablyaflixed thereto, engage the under surface of both upper ilanges of said extensible rails thus preventing vertical displacement or tippingof the gauntry relative to said extensible rails and hence to the truck proper. Y Y 1 n A gear-wheel |06 .is rotatably xed to the'bottom of each of the rear girders |0| by means of bracket |07. A pinion |08 engaging said gear wheel is also rotatably fixed to said bracket, a crank handle |09 being xed to said pinion.

Turning the crank has the effect of rotating the pinion and hence the gear wheel.

Figure 'l shows that each of the extensible rails |20 is provided with an upper rack gear |2| and a lower rack gear |22, both extending longitudinally thereof. Gear wheel |06 meshes with upper rack gear 2|. Hence, when the gear wheel is caused to rotate as aforesaid, the effect is to cause longitudinal movement of the gauntry relative to the extensible rails |20 as well as to the truck itself.

' A brake shoe or clamp is carried by each of the forward upright girders, being afxed to a bracket |2 thereon. A cam I3 to which a crank handle ||4 is aixed, operates the brake shoe causing it to engage or disengage the extensible rail |20 to which it is adjacent.

A pinion |3| is rotatably xed to each of the fixed longitudinal rails |30 and a crank handle |32 is aftixed to said pinion. The latter is positioned to engage lower rack gear |22. When this crank is turned, longitudinal movement of both extensible rails |20 is effected, since pinions |3| are both xedly mounted on a common shaft |33.

In Figures 9 and 10 is shown a chain lock |40 comprising a short piece of angle iron having a pair of slots |4| formed in its horizontal flange. The slots are adapted to receive a chain link which is inserted edge-wise only. When any one link of a chain is so inserted into the lock, longitudinal movement of the chain is limited to the distance separating the two links to which said llink is attached. As shown in Figures 5 and 6,

the lock is amxed to two of the upright girders to enable them to engage endless chains |50 which perform the same function as chains 94 of the embodiment rst above described.

In the embodiment of Figures 5 to 8 too, the mechanism which Vcauses movement of the hoist and of the gauntry and of the rails carrying the gauntry may be manually operated or power driven.

The embodiments herein described are only presently preferred embodiments of the invention. Modications thereof may be had without departing from the broad principles of the invention as hereinafter claimed.

vI claim:

1. A traveling crane comprising a self-propelled vehicle, a pair of spaced rails xed to said vehicle longitudinally thereof, a second pair of longitudinally disposed rails mounted on the iirst pair for longitudinal movement relative to said first pair, a gauntry mounted on said second pair of longitudinal rails for longitudinal movement relative thereto, a pair of spaced rails xed on said gauntry transversely of said vehicle, a sec- ,ond pair of transversely disposed rails mounted on the iirst pair of transverse rails for movement relative thereto transversely of said vehicle, a trolley mounted on said second pair of transverse rails for movement relative thereto transversely of the vehicle, and a hoist on said trolley.

2. A traveling crane comprising a self-propelled vehicle, a pair of spaced rails fixed to' said vehicle longitudinally thereof, a second pair of longitudinally disposed rails mounted on the first pair for longitudinal movement relative to said first pair, a gauntry mounted on said second pair of longitudinal rails for longitudinal movement relative thereto, a pair of spaced rails fixed on said gauntry transversely of said vehicle, a second pair of transversely disposed rails mounted on the first pair of transverse rails for movement relative thereto transversely of said vehicle, a trolley mounted on said second pair of transverse rails for movement relative thereto transversely of the vehicle, and a hoist on said trolley, said second pair of longitudinal rails being provided with rack gears, said vehicle being provided with crank actuated gear Wheels, said gear Wheels being in engagement With said rack gears to effect longitudinal movement of said second pair of longitudinal rails relative to said vehicle.

3. A traveling crane comprising a self-propelled vehicle, a pair of spaced rails fixed to said vehicle longitudinally thereof, a second pair of longitudinally disposed rails mounted on the rst pair for longitudinal movement relative to said rst pair, a gauntry mounted on said second pair of longitudinal rails for longitudinal movement relative thereto, a pair of spaced rails fixed on said gauntry transversely of said vehicle, a second pair of transversely disposed rails mounted on the rst pair of transverse rails for movement relative thereto transversely of said vehicle, a trolley mounted on said second pair of transverse rails for movement relative thereto transversely of the vehicle, and a, hoist on said trolley, said second pair of longitudinal rails being provided with rack gears, said gauntry being provided With crank actuated gear wheels, said mounted on said second pair of transverse rails for movement relative thereto transversely of the vehicle, and a hoist on said trolley, one of said second pair of transverse rails being provided gear wheels being in engagement withI said rack gears to effect longitudinal movement of said gauntry relative to said second pair of longitudinal rails.

4. A traveling crane comprising a self-propelled vehicle, a pair of spaced rails fixed to said vehicle longitudinally thereof, a second pair of longitudinally disposed rails mounted on the rst pair for longitudinal movement relativeto said rst pair, a gauntry mounted on said second pair of longitudinal rails for longitudinal movement relative thereto, a pair of spaced rails fixed on said gauntry transversely of said vehicle, a second pair of transversely disposed rails mounted on the rst pair of transverse rails for movement rela- `tive thereto transversely of said vehicle, a trolley with a rack gear, a chain controlled sheave rotatably mounted on the trolley, said sheave being geared to said rack gear to effect movement of the trolley relative to said second pair of trans1 verse rails transversely of the vehicle.

5. A traveling crane comprising a self-propelled vehicle, a pair of spaced rails fixed to said vehicle longitudinally thereof, a, second pair of longitudinally disposed rails mounted on the rst pair for longitudinal movement relative to said first pair, a gauntry mounted on said second pair of longitudinal rails for longitudinal movement relative thereto. a pair of spaced rails xed on said gauntry transversely of said vehicle, a second pair of transversely disposed rails mounted on the rst pair of transverse rails for movement relative thereto transversely of said vehicle, a trolley mounted on said second pair of transverse rails for movement relative th'ereto transversely of the vehicle, and a hoist on said trolley, said gauntry l being provided with chain controlled sheaves, one of said second pair of transverse rails being provided with a rack gear, said sheaves being geared to said rack gear to effect movement of said second pair of transverse rails relative to said gauntry transversely of the vehicle.

HENRY PRIESTER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 456,361 Graves July 21, 1891 510,495 Zetterberg Dec. 12, 1393 890,151 Marshall June 9, 1908 910,038 Andrews Jan. 19, 1909 1,703,153 Knoll Feb. 26, 1929 1,745,045 Romine Jan. 28, 1930 2,156,424 Barnard May 2, 1939 2,177,525 Henderson Oct. 24, 1939 2,343,014 Langan Feb. 29, 1944;

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2499442 *Dec 12, 1947Mar 7, 1950Wright Lloyd BUnloading apparatus for automotive trucks
US2889061 *Apr 16, 1956Jun 2, 1959Stearn Richard ARear gate boat hoist
US2889062 *Jan 4, 1956Jun 2, 1959Richard A StearnTrailer boat hoist
US2928560 *Jan 6, 1958Mar 15, 1960Wilkin George RAir-charged hydraulic unloader
US2960246 *Dec 3, 1957Nov 15, 1960Lovelace Charles DBoat trailer
US3120316 *Sep 24, 1959Feb 4, 1964Trianco LtdLoading aids
US3204780 *Dec 17, 1964Sep 7, 1965Harnischfeger CorpOverhanging trolley for cranes
US3241697 *Jan 24, 1961Mar 22, 1966Humbert R RogantSide shifting load handling apparatus for an industrial truck
US3244297 *Dec 18, 1963Apr 5, 1966Alliance Machine CoContainer ship cranes
US3796323 *Jul 17, 1972Mar 12, 1974Pyramid Derrick & Equipment CoArrangement for positioning heavy tubular members relative to a drilling mast
US4877365 *Oct 20, 1986Oct 31, 1989Mi-Jack Products Inc.Side shift grappler
US5720400 *Nov 20, 1996Feb 24, 1998Altizer, Sr.; Joseph W.Portable hoist device
DE2313516A1 *Mar 19, 1973Oct 3, 1974Siegfried SchusterVorrichtung zum aufnehmen und versetzen von lasten
Classifications
U.S. Classification212/325, 212/73, 212/337
International ClassificationB66C7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB66C2700/015, B66C7/00
European ClassificationB66C7/00