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Publication numberUS2425026 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 5, 1947
Filing dateJan 13, 1944
Priority dateJan 13, 1944
Publication numberUS 2425026 A, US 2425026A, US-A-2425026, US2425026 A, US2425026A
InventorsBreese James L
Original AssigneeOil Devices
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Burner with detachable generator chamber
US 2425026 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 5, 1947.

'J. L; BREESE BURNER WITH DETAOHABLE GENERATOR CHAMBER Filed Jan. 13, 1944 00 000 F OQQQOQI IID I fvwizzor Jim; .2. fireese iifdi ffyf Patented Aug. 5, 1947 UNITED smras BA'rENr:

OFFICE James L. Breese, Santa Fe, N. Meat. asslgnorto Oil Devices. Santa nership of Illinois Fe, N. Men, a limited part- Application January 13, 1944, Serial No. 51-85048 My invention relates to an improvement in burners and has for one purpose to provide an improved'burner for burning liquid fuels.

Another purpose is to provide improved means for regulating the flow of liquid fuels to a burner.

Another. purpose is to provide an improved means for preventing flow from a fuel tanlr when the closure of the fuel tank has been removed.

3 Claims. (01. 158-91) Another purpose is to provide an improved genthroughout the specificationand drawings.

Referring to the drawings, 1 generally indi- Like parts are indicated by like'characters" catesia burner pot herein shown as having a plurality of primary air inlet apertures 2, spaced circumierentially thereabout and located at v'arie ous distances from the end of thep'ot. The pot is shown as having a closed bottom or end 3,I

which may .be continuous with the circumferential side wall of the pot. The. side wall is1also provided withja plurality of secondary air inlets 4, shown as arranged in a single circumferential rowadjacent the open end of the pot. The secondary air inlet apertures I are shown as tilted whereby iets of air are'directed inwardly and toward the open end ofthe pot. The pot has a terminal flange 5 extending outwardly from its open end. 6 is an .outer surrounding skirt or circumferential outer wall. It may be secured tothe flange by any suitable screws or securing means I. 8 is a centrally apertured flame ring.

3 indicates generally a liquid fuel vaporizing chamber having a top cover or closure l0, which is welded as at H to the burner pot l. The cover is apertured as at H in line with an aperture l2 in the circumferential side wall of the pot I. i4 is any suitable clamp. the ends l5 of which are supported upon the cover ill to provide a closed loop surrounding the vaporizing chamber 9. i6 is any suitable screw passing through an abutment portion ll of the clamp l4 and adapted to 'be manually manipulated by the thumb portion It, to direct pressure against the bottom of the vaporizing chamber, 9 and to hold it 'removably in position.

l3 isan" air inlet tube extending downwardly through the top ill of the vaporizing chamber 3.

It is provided with a plurality of vertical slots}! which extend substantially below the level of the liquid in the chamber 3. 2| is an inner air inlet tube nested with the tube l9 and rotatable m relation thereto. It is provided with vertical slotsor apertures 22, which may be moved into or out of register with the apertures or slots 23 by rotation of the inner tube 2|. The inner tube may berotated by the pin 23 which also serves as a means for supporting the,inner tube 2| in proper position. It will be understood that the air supply flowinginwardly through the tube 2i and through the apertures 23, and 22 may be varied from a fully open to a fully shut position by rotating the tube 21, which constitutes a readily operable means for varying the air supply to the interiorof the vaporizing chamber 3.

A supply of liquid fuel may be maintained in the fuel' tank 33"which is connected by a fuel pipe 3| with the interior of the vaporizing chamber 3. 32 indicates a. valve block or body shown as located within the tank 33 and having a bore 33 and a larger bore 34 in which-is positioned a ball 30 3.5 normally urged by the spring 33 into position to sh'utthe passage 33. The spring is positioned within and controlled by the screwthreaded hollow plug aiwhichi's screw threaded into the bore. 1., f 1 v s I 38 is a closure cap for the tank 30 andis shown as provided-with avalve control'stem 33. 'The parts a're 'so'proportioned that when the cap' 33 is closed, the pin 33 engages the ball 35 and forces it intothe openposition ln which it is shown in i Figure 1, ,liquid fuel then flowing past the ball through, the inlet passage- 40; to the bore 33 and thence to the pipe 3!. l

It will be understood that when the cap 38 open to refill the fueltank, any flow of fuel along the fuel pipe 3i is temporarily inhibited by the action of; the spring 36 against the ball 33. when the cap 38 is again replaced, the pin 39 pushes the ball 35 into inoperative position and fuel may flow along the bore 33 and the pipe 3|. If desired, the parts ma be so proportioned as shown in Figure 1, that the ball 35 may be freed, for

movement to the closed position by slightly rotating the cap 38. e

In the operation of the heater, fuel-vapor is generated the chamber 3 by local combustion 1 at orabove the surface of the fuel x in that slots 20 and 22. Thus the tube 21-, in connection with the outer tube i9, provides a shuttered, adjustable flow, air control member. The vaporized liquid fuel, preferably with some excess supply of air, flows through the aperture l2 into the interior of the pot I. It there receives a primary air supply through the primary air inlets 2. This mixture then flows through the mouth or open end of the pot and receives its final airsupply through the secondary air inlets 4. The final mixture is burned at or near the flame ring 8. the flame extending to the right of the flame ring 8, referring to the position of the parts as shown in Figure 1.

It will be understood that it is immaterial whether the axis of the pot is vertical or horizontal but th horizontal arrangement is practical and efficient and provides an elementwhich can very easily be secured to the side or front of a stove or heater, in such fashion that the flame projects into the fire box or combustion chamber of the stove or heater.

The liquid fuel vaporizing chamber 9 may be made unitary with or may be permanently secured to the pot structure but under some circumstances I find it advantageous to make it removable, as shown herein.

It will be realized that whereas I have shown and described an operative device, still many changes may be made in the size, shape, arrangemerit and number of parts without departing materially from the spirit of my invention. I wish,

sense diagrammatic.

I claim:

1. In a liquid fuel burner, a horizontally axised burner pot having a circumferential side wall, a closed end wall and an open end, said circumferential side wall having therein a purality of primary air inlet apertures spaced circumferen. tially thereabout and located at various distances from the ends of the pot, secondary air inlet means located adjacent the open end of the pot, said circumferential side wall having an aperture located adjacent the closed end wall of the pot, means forming a liquid fuel vaporizing chamber below said pot, ,the interior of the liquid fuel vaporizing chamber being in communication with the interior of said pot through said aperture, means for supplying to the interior of said vaporizing chamber a variable supply of air and means for supplying liquid fuel to the interior of said vaporizing chamber.

2. In a liquid fuel burner, a horizontally axised burner pot having a circumferential side wall,

therefore, that my showing be taken as in a large a closed end wall and an open end, said circumferential side wall having therein a plurality of primary air inlet apertures spaced circumferentially thereabo ut and located at various distances from the ends of the pot, secondary air inlet means located adjacent the open end of the pot, means forming a liquid fuel vaporizing chamber n rlyi one end of the pot, said circumferential side wall having an aperture located adjacent the closed end wall of the pot, the interior of the liquid fuel vaporizing chamber being in communication with the interior of said pot through said aperture, meanai'or supply g to the interior of said vaporizing chamber a variable supply of air and means for supplying liquid fuel to the interior of said vaporizing chamber including acfuel tank and a liquid fuel supply, duct extending from said tank anddownwardly into said vaporizing chamber and having an open end located below, the level of the liquid fuel in said vapo izing chamber.

3. In a liquid fuel burner, a. horizontally axlsed burner pot having a circumferential side wall,

a closed end wall and an open end, said circumferential side wall having therein a plurality of primary air inlet apertures spaced circumferentially thereabout and located at various distances from the ends of the pot, secondary air inlet means located adjacent the open end of the pot, means forming a liquid fuel vaporizing chamber underlying the pot, and means for supplying a liquid fuel, for vaporization, thereto, said circumferential side wall .having an aperture located adjacent the closed end wall of the pot, the interior of the liquid fuel vaporizing chamber being in communication with the interior of said pot through said aperture, and means for supplying to the interior of said vaporizing chamber a variable supply of air.

JAMES L. BREESE.

nnrsnnncns crrnn' file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name 4 Date 2,083,832 Daniels June 15, 1937 2,137,673 Knapp et a1. Nov. 22, 1938 2,302,287 Behrendt et al. Nov. 17, 1942 1,150,332 Boyer ..'Aug. 17, 1915 1,372,062 Carruth Mar. 22, 1921 4 1,113,966 Dunn Oct. 20, 1914 1,271,680 Dunn July 9, 1918 1,143,582 Hamilton June 15, 1915 1,655,569 Scheu Jan. 10, 1928 2,120,291 Morin June 14, 1938 1,761,537 Ravenor June 3, 1980 2,209,649 Frankland July 30, 1940 2,348,721 Breese et al May 16. 1944 1,907,337

Scheu May .2, 1933

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1113966 *Oct 6, 1913Oct 20, 1914Emanuel W DunnHeater.
US1143582 *Aug 25, 1914Jun 15, 1915James L HamiltonOrchard-heater.
US1150332 *Aug 17, 1914Aug 17, 1915Charles T BoyerAutomobile fuel-tank.
US1271680 *Jan 15, 1918Jul 9, 1918Emanuel W DunnHeater.
US1372062 *Apr 25, 1918Mar 22, 1921Carruth William GSafety device for tanks
US1655569 *Jun 21, 1926Jan 10, 1928Scheu William CSmokeless orchard heater
US1761537 *Dec 3, 1924Jun 3, 1930Ravenor Wilfred FrancisOil burner and method of effecting the combustion of oil fuels
US1907337 *May 18, 1929May 2, 1933Scheu Products Company LtdOrchard heater
US2083832 *Aug 3, 1936Jun 15, 1937Bertram AxmanOil burner
US2120291 *Nov 5, 1935Jun 14, 1938Morin Luke OOrchard heater
US2137673 *Apr 23, 1937Nov 22, 1938Senior Alfred IrvineOil burner
US2209649 *May 26, 1938Jul 30, 1940Frankland William HowardOil burner
US2302287 *Feb 12, 1940Nov 17, 1942Ephraim BanningBurner
US2348721 *May 11, 1942May 16, 1944Oil DevicesHorizontal hydroxylating burner
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2543980 *Feb 15, 1947Mar 6, 1951Motor Wheel CorpVaporizing type liquid fuel burner
US3067543 *Mar 9, 1961Dec 11, 1962Christopher Bracey RaymondContainers for growing plants
DE3421260A1 *Jun 7, 1984Jan 10, 1985Earle C ShermanVerpackungsmaschine
Classifications
U.S. Classification431/333, 431/338, 222/510
International ClassificationF23D5/00
Cooperative ClassificationF23D5/00
European ClassificationF23D5/00