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Publication numberUS2425043 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 5, 1947
Filing dateFeb 12, 1945
Priority dateMar 3, 1943
Publication numberUS 2425043 A, US 2425043A, US-A-2425043, US2425043 A, US2425043A
InventorsArlington Moore George
Original AssigneeArlington Moore George
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container
US 2425043 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. A. MOORE Aug. 5, 1947.

CONTAINER G. A. MooRE boum Aug. 5, 1947.

INER

3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Original Filed March 3,' 1943 IN1/aman #adrig/gian M0 )i A TREK?.

ug. 5; 1947. G; A MOQRE 2,425,043

CONTAINER Original Filed latch 3, 1943 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 lN/ENTR A TTORNE YS.

For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention, reference should be had to the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. l is a diagrammatic representation of a preferred method of continuously converting suitable packaging materials into blanks to be made into tubular formation for subsequent erection into containers and packages;

Fig. 2 is a plan view illustrating a fragmentary portion of one suitable type of cardboard carton web formation with pre-spotted designs of a suitable adhesive and having cut-out portions, the blank being held sectionally together` by perforated segments;

Fig. 3 is a plan view similar to Fig. 2 illustrating a cut-out web formation having been adhesively amxed to `another web consisting of a laminated sheet of liner material;

Fig. 4 is a finally completed single blank adapted to be formed into a tube;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary portion of a corner of a blank such as that shown in Fig. 4 enlargedto show `the relative lamina constituting the same;

Fig. 6 is a plan view of a lblank such as that shown in Fig. 4 folded over upon itself along a median line;

Fig. 'I is an end view of the folded blank shown Fig. 8 is a view similar to'Fig. 7 with marginalA portions of the blank shown being thermally sealed together;

Fig. 9 is a plan view of the completed blank showing the sealed marginal portion folded over upon the reinforcement structure;

Fig. 10 is a further step illustrating the sealing of the marginal portion to the reinforcement structure;

' broken away and sealed but unfolded at the top;

Fig. is a sectional end elevational view of a fragment of the upper half of the container shown in Fig. 12 taken along line I5-I5 and fu'rf ther illustrating the manual closure of an end;

Fig. 16 is an end elevational view of a fragment of the upper half of a container showing the relative position of the end fold and seam closure;

Fig. 1'7 is a perspective v iewv of a fragmentary portion of the end of a completed closure of a container illustrating the relative positions of the seam structures; and

Fig. 18 is a perspective view of a portion broken from the end of a completed container. Y

Referring more particularly to Fig. 1 of thev drawings, there has been diagrammatically set forth for purposes of clarity in illustration acontinuous and progressive scheme for converting packaging material used in conjunction with the principles of the present invention. Briefly, it will be noted that to the left there is depicted a stock roll of suitable cardboard reinforcing material which is preferably first run over an applicator roll, such as an etched gravure cylinder 'revolving in a bath of suitable printing ink whereby the bottom portions. where desired, of Sllh a cardboard web can suitably be printed. One or more applicator rolls can, of course, be provided depending on the number of colors desired in the printing operation. As the web progresses it runs lbetween suitable cut-out rollers which cut such a web into a plurality of blank sections held together in adjacent relationship by small uncut but perforated segments, all'as will more fully be described hereinafter. It will b e understood that, depending on the results desired, these cutout rollers become optional as to their size and the nature of the cut-out configuration. As the web proceeds it passes over a similar applicator roll as that utilized in the printing and there is then applied a predetermined pattern or design of a hot melt adhesive to the under surface of the web. Any suitable means of applying the design may be utilized. For convenience of illustration, an etched gravure cylinder is indicated herein having the usual doctor blade governing the application of the hot melt, but it will be understood that other means of application, such as by passing the web around a drum immersed in thev adhesive so as to secure the desired application may be utilized if desired. Preferably, the web is next passed through a drier, if necessary, to dry the adhesive application. Y

In the meantime, another laminated structure is being developed. Either such a structure can be made independently or simultaneously run to produce a laminated sheet. The laminated sheet consists preferably of ,a fibrous material, such as paper or glassine run off a stock roll, to which there is applied a surface coating of a suitab-le laminati-ng adhesive. This coating may also be applied by the utilization of an etched gravure cylinder wiped with a doctor blade, the cylinder revolving in the bath of laminating adhesive. Here again there has been shown the same type of applicator ras indicated above. As this web progresses it joins another web running, off a stock roll and thlsweb preferably is of a nonfibrous nature, preferably a thermoplastic materialvor any suitable material which has been treated to provide heat-sealing characteristics. While such material as Pliolm and Koroseal are desirable, it will be understood that in the event such materials are not readily available, a heatsealing Cellophane, for example, may be used. These two webs are joined together in the bite of two laminating pressure rollers and the suitable laminated sheet is obtained. The laminated sheet passes around idler rollers and again is similarly vgiven a coating on its fibrous surface, partially in a spot-printed design, and dried, all as more fully explained hereinafter. This web` or laminated sheet then meets the untreated surface of the cardboard web and these two are likewise laminated together as they pass between laminating and scoring rollers respectively to effect a score line through the, various lamina. It will be understood that the scoring operation can be produced at an earlier point in the cardboard web if desired, although for certain pui-,

poses and for certain containers it is desirableY there is indicated generally at 20 `a web of 'rein-v forcing cardboard material suitable for the formation of outer walls of cartons. The particular web here indicated is free of any indication of display printing but there has been indicated a spot-printed design of a suitable adhesive indicated generally at 2i. As heretofore described, the web passes through suitable rollers having knives, for example, which remove portions o1 the web as at 22 but leave small segments 23 holding the web together in a series of adjacently spaced apart identical blanks. These segments, where they join each of these blanks, are preferably perforated as at 24.

As seen in Fig. 3 and as heretofore explained, the web of reinforcing material is next laminated to an already laminated sheet 25 and it will be observed that this sheet 25 is of a greater overall width than the web so that each separated blank comprising the web is surrounded by a marginal portion of the laminated sheet exposing the iibrous portion thereof and this marginal portion extends completely around the entire web, including .the cut-out portions. It is, of course, necessary to keep the laminated sheet as well as the cardboard web 2@ in registration. As before indicated, printing o3 adhesive on the Iibrous sheet of the laminated structure is also by means of an etched cylinder carrying a suitable design necessary to give the proper application of adhesive to this web. Furthermore, the etched cylinder not only is equipped to apply a spot-printed design which is commensuratein area with each individual blank oi cardboard material to which it is laminated but, in addition, prints suitable spots of adhesive 2d in those areas appearing as marginal portions between the blanks as they register in the cut-out portions 22. The particular nature oi the combined lamina may more readily be observed by reference to Fig. 5 wherein there is shown laminated to the cardboard material 2d a fibrous layer 2,1, such as paper or glassine, and a thermoplastic material 23, or a material treated to provide such charac- Vteristics, such as those heretofore. mentioned.

After completing this iinal laminating opera'- tion the entire combined structure is preferably, at this point, subjected to the pressure of a pair oi suitably score rollers which provide score lines generally as indicated in the drawings and thereafter eac'n combined structure is separated into blanks indicated generally at lili (see Fig. 4).

Referring more particularly to the blanks shown in this ngure these score lines are of two kinds. Parallel score lines 3d define the walls oi the container as well as the end closure flaps together with triangular or diagonally directed groups of score lines 3i. Preferably the score lines of the triangular formations should be embossed into the board oppositely to that oi' the straight or parallel score lines. In other words, taking Fig. 4 for example as the top face or" the board, the parallel score lines are male on the top surface and female on the bottom surface, whereas the diagonal score lines are female on the top and male on the bottom. The lines when so scored facilitate the ready formation of the desired folds and insures the board surfaces making quick and ready contact in the completion of the end closures,

Referring now to Figs. 6 to ll, it will be seen that a blank, such as that illustrated in Fig, 4, has been folded along a median line represented by one of the centrally disposed longitudinal parallel score lines so that the cardboard web is on the outside and the laminated sheet is on the ins side with the heat-scalable surface in face-t race relationship.

As indicated by Fig. 3, where the marginal portions come together they are subjected to the action of suitable sealing irons which may be o! either the pressure or the roller type and in this manner these marginal portions are thermally welded or sealed together. It should be noted that the operation of folding and sealing as heretofore indicated may be practiced immediately and as a part of the laminating process or may be performed subsequently and independently, depending on whichever method is most convenient.

It should also be observed that one of the cuter cardboard panels is somewhat foreshortened to an errent which is equal tothe combined thicknesses of the laminated inner sheet, as indicated at 32. This permits ready folding of the marginally sealed portion to the adjacent marginal surface of the. cardboard reinforcing structure 20 and along the marginal application ofthe hot melt adhesive il. lThe seam is then heat-sealed to the cardboard surface il as indicated in Fig. 9 and there is thus provided a longitudinal seam secured to the carton body where it extends beyond adjacent edges thereof.

In a flattened or knocked down condition, however, the unopened tube is ideally suited for shipment in large quantities from the factory oi the converter to the user, suitable for erecting the saine into container formation. From Fig. l1 it will be observed that the tube has now been squared in condition to infold, for example, one end` to form a container bottom. After filling with a commodity, for example, food, the mouth of the container is similarly closed and an hermetically sealed package is provided. Y

By referring to the remaining figures ci the drawings, it will be observed .that this inleiding operation can readily `be performed manually. Briefly, the manual closure of such containers can rapidly be eectedI and the construction is particularly designed for'such operation. The index lingers oi both hands, for example, inwardly press the triangularly scored panels which collapse downwardly. This action of the fingers draws downwardly the multiple thicknesses of the iold, pulling the top edges below the parallel top margins of the extension oi the marginal lip oi the container, thus facilitating a two-ply joint over substantially the entire length of the seam.

Thereafter the extension panels of the side Walls are pressed down together and it be seen that they do not overlap. The extending marginal portions, however, emerge from adjacent edges of the panels and after the panels are brought down into squared position, suitable sealing irons are brought to hear thereagainst and another hermetic seal is eiected. This type of seam is illustrated in Fig. le, shown completed as indicated at at, the parallel lines drawn across the extended margin presenting depressions or flutes resulting from the use, ior example, oa crimp sealing iron.

l't will be observed that the hot metal adhesive 2l has bn activated simultaneously with the pellicle of lining material and merged into the primary longitudinal seam. When using heatsealing cellophane for example, as the interior lining face, heat pressure activates the thermoplastic coating to cement the same together and the hot melt pattern that is on the exterior margins of the tuck-in fold is activated at the same time and news over the top edges of the inward told plugging what otherwise would be tiny apertures of the junction formed by four layers runy ning into two layers of material thickness.

'I'he completed seams 33 and $8 are shown in Figs. 16 and 17. When each seam has been pressed flat after being contacted by a hot plate which has activated the hot melt patterns of adhesive on the board material. and the margins and the tuck-in folds of the board material have been brought into folded relationship, the desired type of hermetically sealed container is produced.

It will thus be seen; that the objects hereinbefore set forth may readily and efficiently be attained and since certain changes in carrying out the above'method and certain modifications in the article which embodies the invention may be made without departing from the scope thereof, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the'accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

It is .also to be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all of the generic and specific features of the invention herein described, and all statements of the scope of the invention which, as a matter of language, might be said to fall therebetween.

Having described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A tubular body formationadapted to be erectedlnto a container with hermetically sealed ends, which comprises an outer blank of reinforcing cardboard material having score lines delining side and end panels, an inner liner of -laminated sheet material consisting of a. heat-sealable web and a fibrous sheet, the latter being 1aminated to said outer blank of cardboard material and extending marginally beyond the perimeter thereof and which laminated liner and blank structure is folded upon itself. with the web innermost, said inner liner extending beyond the free edges of the perimeter of said folded reinforcing cardboard material, and portions of the extensions being sealed together where they overlie each other between the ends of the tube to provide a longitudinal seam for said tube, said sealed extensions projecting beyond the adjacent edges of said cardboard material.

8 laminated to said outer blank of cardboard material and extending marginally beyond the perimeter thereof and which laminated liner and blank structure is folded upon itself with the web the ends of the tube to provide a longitudinal seam for said tube, said sealed extensions projecting beyond the adJacent edges of said cardboard material and said longitudinal seam being sealed against an adjacent marginal edge of v said outer reinforcing material.

4. A tubular vbody formation adapted to be erected into a container with hermetically sealed ends, which comprises an outer blank of reinforcing cardboard material having deeply impressed crease l'ines defining side panels and end panels with tuck-in flaps, an inner liner of laminated sheet material consisting of a heat-sealable web and a ilbrous sheet, the latter being laminated to said outer blank of cardboard material 2. Atubular body formation adapted to be i erected into a container with hermetically sealed ends, which comprises an outer blank of reinforcing cardboard material, an inner liner of laminated sheet material consisting of a heat-scalable web and a fibrous sheet, the latter being laminated to said outer blank of cardboard material and extending marginally beyond the perimeter thereof and which laminated liner and blank structure is folded upon itself with the web innermost, said combined'outer yreinforcing blank and'laminated sheet material having deeply impressed coinciding score lines defining side panels and end panels with tuck-in flaps, said inner liner extending beyond the free edges of the perimeter of said folded reinforcing cardboard material, and portions of the extensions being sealed together where they overlie each other between the ends of the tube to provide a longitudinal seam for said tube, said sealed extensions projecting beyond the adjacent edges of said cardboard material.

3. A tubular body formation adapted to be erected into a container with hermetically sealed ends, which comprises an outer blank of reinwhich is folded upon itself with the web innermost, said inner liner extending beyond all three of the spaced apart edges of said reinforcing material and the extensions being bonded together between the ends of the tube to provide a longitudinal seam for said tube, and the outer remaining extensions of said inner liner having predetermined marginal applications of hot melt adhesive on the fibrous sheet at the tuck-in portions to seal th'em together simultaneously with the heat-sealing of the ends of the tube in providing a container and package.

5. A tubular body formation to be erected into acarton with hermetically sealed ends, which comprises an outer .blank of reinforcing cardboard material, an inner liner of laminated sheet material consisting of a thermoplastic web and a paper layer, said paper layer being laminated i to said outer blank of cardboard material which is folded upon itself with the web innermost, said combined outer reinforcing blank and laminated sheet having coinciding diagonal and parallel score lines defining side and end panels, said diagonal score lines being inwardly impressed and said parallel score lines being outwardly impressed, and said inner liner extending beyond the spaced apart edges of said reinforcing, blank and being thermally sealed together where they overlie each other between the ends of the tub to provide a longitudinal seam.

6. A container which constitutes a tubular formation of a blank of cardboard reinforcing material having adhesively secured therein a liner of laminated sheet material consisting of a web of thermoplastic material and a web of fibrous material with the thermoplastic surface innermost, said laminated sheet extending marginally beyond the perimeter of said cardboard reinforcing material in thermoplastic face-to-face relationship and being thermally bonded together to l provide a longitudinal seam extending beyond forcing cardboard material, an inner liner of` the adjacent edges of said cardboard, said container having deeply impressed' hinge lines delining s ide, top and bottom panels, as well as deeply impresseddiagonal hinge lines in the top and bottom panels dening tuck-in flaps, said bottom panels being infolded with laminated sheet extensions extending between and beyond f 'said bottom panels, said extensions being thermally bonded together and being sealed to one of said bottom panels.

'7. An hermetically sealed package, which oomprises a tubular formation of a blank ol' cardboard reinforcing material having adhesively secured therein an inner liner of a laminated sheet consisting ot a web of heat-scalable material and a paper web, the heat-scalable material surface being innermost. said laminated sheet extending marginally beyond the perimeter of said cardboard reinforcing material and between and beyond adjacent longitudinal edges with the heatsealable material in face-to-face relationship and being thermally bonded together and sealed marginally to an adjacent longitudinal edge ot said package, said package having deeply impressed hinge lines deilnlng side, top and bottom panels as well as deeply impressed diagonal hinge lines in the top and bottom panels dellning tuck-in lnaps',saidtopandbottompanelsbeinginfoldecl REFERENCES CITED The following references of record in the ille of this patent:

UNITED STATES- PTa'NTs Name Number Date 2,216,527 Weiss et al. Oct. 1, l90 2,167,634 Calvert Aug. 1, 1939 508.571 Holman Nov. 14, 1893 2,353,178 Moore July 1l. 1944 Certificate of Correction Patent No. 2,425,043: August 5, 1947. GEORGE ARLINGTON MOORE It is hereby certified that errors appear in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Column 5, line 47, for score first occurrence, read scored; column 6, line 65, for metal read melt; and that the said Letters Patent should be read With these corrections therein that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Ofhce.

Signed and sealed this 30th day of December, A. D. 1947.

THOMAS F. MURPHY,

Asszstant Commisszuuer 0f Patents.

Certificate of Correction Patent No. 2,425,048; August 5, 1947` GEORGE ARLINGTON MOORE It is hereby certied that errors appear in the printed speeication of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Column 5, line 47, for score rst occurrence, read scored; column 6, line 65, for metal read melf; and that the said Letters Patent should be read with these corrections therein that the same may Conform to the record of lche case in the Patent Office.

Signed and sealed this 30th day of December, A. D. 1947.

THOMAS F. MURPHY,

Asszstcmt ommzsszuner 0f Patents.

Patent Citations
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US2353178 *Jul 26, 1940Jul 11, 1944Shellmar Products CoContainer and method of making same
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2628179 *Feb 1, 1950Feb 10, 1953Bergstein Robert MMethod of producing cartons having metal tearing edges
US2678274 *Feb 19, 1949May 11, 1954Polaroid CorpMasked photographic product for receiving a transfer image
US2998178 *Feb 4, 1957Aug 29, 1961Reynolds Metals CoLined container for liquids and liner therefor
US3146492 *Dec 18, 1957Sep 1, 1964Jerome H LemelsonApparatus for making a lenticular display sheet
US3295654 *Aug 20, 1963Jan 3, 1967American Library AssApparatus for producing labels
US3499598 *Mar 17, 1967Mar 10, 1970Continental Can CoMulti-ply carton
US3619327 *May 9, 1969Nov 9, 1971Tricollet AugustePackaging production
US3632252 *Mar 5, 1969Jan 4, 1972Owens Illinois IncApparatus for forming articles
US3768946 *Apr 5, 1971Oct 30, 1973Matuschke WFrequency carrier molding apparatus
US4348449 *Jul 9, 1979Sep 7, 1982Melvin Bernard HerrinProcess and apparatus for forming flexible fold lines in thermoplastic sheets
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US5340427 *Apr 24, 1992Aug 23, 1994Avery Dennison CorporationMethod of making an index tab label assembly
US5736204 *Jun 7, 1994Apr 7, 1998The Estate Of Leonard PearlsteinCompostable packaging for containment of liquids
US6090235 *Mar 28, 1997Jul 18, 2000Policarta S.R.L.Process for formation of a continuous composite tape for the production of wrappings for food products
US20040157011 *May 5, 2000Aug 12, 2004Travel Tags, Inc.Method of bonding a lenticular lens sheet to plastic objects and objects made from same
US20050053737 *Oct 21, 2004Mar 10, 2005Travel Tags, Inc.Method of bonding a lenticular lens sheet to plastic objects and objects made from same
US20070132122 *Jan 19, 2007Jun 14, 2007Travel Tags, Inc.Methods of manufacturing plastic objects having bonded lenticular lens-sheets
US20080118673 *Oct 31, 2007May 22, 2008Travel Tags, Inc.Plastic objects including lenticular lens sheets
US20080118674 *Oct 31, 2007May 22, 2008Travel Tags, Inc.Plastic objects including lenticular lens sheets
DE1086984B *Nov 25, 1957Aug 11, 1960Bahlsen WernerVerfahren zur Herstellung von Behaelterzuschnitten
DE1137935B *Dec 27, 1960Oct 11, 1962Feldmuehle AgVerfahren zum Herstellen von mit thermoplastischem Kunststoff versehenen Zuschnittenaus Papier, Pappe od. dgl.
DE3041050A1 *Oct 31, 1980May 13, 1982Linnich Papier & KunststoffVerfahren zur herstellung von kunststoffbeschichteten fluessigkeitsverpackungen
DE3500547A1 *Jan 10, 1985Jul 10, 1986Focke & CoVerfahren und vorrichtung zum herstellen von zuschnitten fuer verpackungen
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Classifications
U.S. Classification229/5.84, 156/252, 156/224, 229/137, 428/34.2, 156/218, 156/277, 428/34.6, 428/34.7, 156/227, 156/291, 229/164.2
International ClassificationB65D5/56, B65D5/60
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/606
European ClassificationB65D5/60B2