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Publication numberUS2426391 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 26, 1947
Filing dateFeb 27, 1943
Priority dateFeb 27, 1943
Publication numberUS 2426391 A, US 2426391A, US-A-2426391, US2426391 A, US2426391A
InventorsWalter H Emerson
Original AssigneeHomer Laughlin China Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dinnerware decorating apparatus
US 2426391 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1947. w. H. EMERSON DINNERWARE DECORATING APPARATUS Filed Feb. 27, 1945 5 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. mm HM 0W ,lutcl' W+M 0 Aug. 26, 1947. w. H. EMERSON 2,426,391

DINNERWARE DECORATING APPARATUS Filed Feb. 27, 1945 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Aug. 26, 1947. w. H. EMERSON 2,426,391

DINNERWARE DECORATING APPARATUS Filed Feb. 27, 1943 5 SheetsShe et 4 INVENTOR. 1144:

714. (1,14 A arronlvem'.

Patented. Aug. 26, 1947 DINNERWARE DECORATING APPARATUS Walter H. Emerson, East Liverpool, Ohio, assignor to The Homer Laughlin China Company, Newell, W. Va., a corporation of Delaware Application February 27, 1943, Serial No. 477,411

This invention relates to dinnerware decorating machines, and more particularly to machines for applying bands of coating material to articles of dinnerware. The coating may be a glaze or color or the like, but in this specification it shall be referred to as color.

Machines have been proposed heretofore for painting bands on dinnerware, such as on the shoulders of plates and around the outside of cups, but most of them apply the color by means of applicators that engage the ware. For various reasons those applicators have not been satisfactory. In the single case of which I am aware wherein the color was sprayed on the plate around a circular mask temporarily resting on the center of the plate, the machine required too many manual operations to have a satisfactory rate of output, and the inner edges of the colored bands were irregular and smeared. This was due to the use of improperly cleaned masks and to the lack of a tight fit between theware and the edges of the mask. The machine also lacked satisfactory means for properly centering the ware relative to the mask.

It is among the objects of this invention to provide a banding machine which is automatic, which automatically centers the ware, which sprays on bands of coating, which effectively masks surfaces that are not to receive the coating, which thoroughly cleans the masks after each use, and which is rapid in operation, simple in construction, and easy to operate.

In accordance with this invention a mask is held against a piece of ware while color is applied to the unprotected portion, preferably by spraying. After the ware has been banded it is separated from the mask and the latter is washed and dried before being applied to an unbanded piece of ware. In the case of flat ware, such as plates and saucers, the mask is held against the center of the ware by a vacuum while the surrounding surface of the ware is sprayed with color. At least the edge of the mask is flexible so that it can conform to the adjoining surface of the ware and thus provide a seal. Most suitably, the mask is disposed above the ware so that in order for the vacuum to support the ware the mask must tightly engage the ware, thereby preventing color from spraying or running under .the edge of the mask. When the vacuum is released, the ware can be deposited on a conveyor or in the hand of an operator. The mask and ware are preferably rotated while the banding color is being applied, and the mask is rotated during washing and drying. To apply the ware to the maskcentrally thereof, the ware is first placed on a centering device directly 23 Claims.

below the mask and is then raised up to the mask. In the most practical embodiment of my invention a plurality of mask-supporting vertical spindles, preferably rotatable, are carried by an intermittently rotating table by which they are indexed from station to station so that while centering and loading are taking place at one station, banding may occur at another, unloading at another, mask cleaning at another, and mask drying at another. If desired, the masks may serve simply as supports for the ware while other processes, such as lining the edge of the ware, are performed at stations that otherwise would be idle. In the case of lining, an applicator such as shown in my copending application Serial No. 481,737 for Dinnerware decorating apparatus, filed April 3, 1943, now Patent No. 2,380,509, issued July 31, 1945, may be mounted beside the table for periodically engaging rotating ware adjacent the applicator. i

The preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which Fig. 1 is a plan view taken on the lingI-I of Fig. 2; Fig. 2 is a vertical section looking in the direction of line II-II of Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a vertical section looking in the direction of line.III-III of Fig. 1; Fig. 4 is a horizontal section taken on the line IV--IV of Fig. 2; Fig. 5 is'an enlarged view of a portion of Fig. 2 showing the ware just being applied to a mask; Fig. 6 is a fragmentary plan view of part of the actuating means for the centering device; Fig. '7 is an enlarged vertical section through a head and mask supporting a piece of flat ware; Fig. 8 is a similar view of a modified head supporting a cup; and Fig. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical section through one of the rotary spindles.

Referring to the drawings, a cylindrical housing I is provided in the center of its lower portion with a bearing 2 in which the lower end of a. vertical hollow shaft 3 is journaled. The shaft extends above the top of the housing and through a bearing 4 mounted on a cylindrical casting 5 supported by the housing. The shaft is turned intermittently by means of a Geneva gear mechanism the spider l of which is secured to the lower end of the shaft below bearing 2. The rotor 8 is secured to the lower end of another vertical shaft 9 journaled in upper and lower bearings Ill and II mounted in the housing at one side of the center shaft. The central portion of the side shaft carries a sprocket I2 that is driven by a chain l3 from a small sprocket l4 driven by a worm and gear unit l5. This unit is operated by a chain and sprocket drive [6 from a speed reducing unit l'l attached to an electric motor l8.

3 all within the base of the housing. The drive is shown best in Fig. 4.

Rigidly mounted on the upper end of the center shaft is a circular table carrying at circumferentially spaced intervals aroundits edge a plurality of downwardl projecting rotatable spindles 2|. Each spindle is hollow and supports at its lower end a head 22 to the bottom of which a its upper end to the table. This post has a flange 25 at its lower end that supports a pair of vertically spaced bearings 21. Encircling and supported by the bearings is a metal cup 28 provided at its upper end with a rotary sealing member 29 that frictionally engages a collar 30 tightly mounted on the post. Integral with the bottom of the cup and projecting downwardly therefrom is a, hollow shaft 3i on the lower end of which head 22 is mounted. Rigidly mounted on the cup is an encircling wheel 32 for a. purpose to be described later. The post is provided with an axial passage 33 that extends up into collar 30 to meet a. radial passage 34 therein. As shown in Fig. 7,

the head and mask have central openings aligned with the axial passage in shaft 3| that supports them.

It will be noted that the masks are located several inches above the top of housing I. Therefore, to hold ware against the bottoms of the masks the air pressurebetween each mask and adjoining piece of ware is reduced by connecting the supporting spindle to a vacuum pump. Thus, the outer end of passage 34 in collar 30 is. connected by a laterally extending pipe 36 to a radial passage in a block 31 mounted on the center shaft. The inner ends of the radial passages in the block communicate with the axial passage of the center shaft. Near its lower end shaft 3 is provided with a radial passage 38 (Fig. 2) that opens into a chamber in a stationary sealing member 39 which is connected by a pipe 40 to a. vacuum pump (not shown). Each upper pipe 36 contains a valve, r

such as the type known as Quik-as-Wink, that has lateral openings 42, shown at the right hand side of Figs. 1 and 2, connecting the inside of the pipe on the spindle side of the valve with the atmosphere and which are periodically opened and closed by the slidable closure member 43. When openings 42 are. covered by the closure member, the spindle is connected with the vacuum pump,

but when the openings are uncovered to release the vacuum in the spindle, pipe 36 on the other side of the valve is closed off so that the vacuum therein will not be lost.

The valve closure members are movedback and forth by bifurcated valve-actuating arms 44 mounted at one end'on the upper ends of vertical shafts 45 that are oscillatable in bearings 46 supported by a stationary ring 4'! encircling the upper end of casting 5. The shafts extend down through the top of the housing and, as shown in Fig. 4, are operatively connected to each other by levers 48, 49, and 50 and links 5| and 52. Lever 50 carries a roller ,53 at its free end that follows a groove 54 in a cam 55 mounted on the 'constantly rotating side shaft 9. The cam groove is 4 shaped to swing lever 50 to close each successive vacuum control valve after it reaches the loading station and to open it when it reaches the unloading station.

In order to apply ware to each successive mask at the loading station, as shown in Fig. 5, a liftving plate 51 directly below the mask is mounted mounted on the continuously rotating side shaft 9 and that periodically raises the roller and thus lifts plate 51 toward .a mask 23 above it. The rolle is held down on the cam at all times by a coil spring 56 connected to the tube and the main housing below it. The vertical movement of post 58 in tube 59 islimited by a pin 61 projecting from the post into a vertical slot 58 in the tube. The post is normally maintained in its upper position in the tube by a coil spring 69 compressed between the bottomof the post and the top of bearing member 6!. This spring permits the post to give"v a little in case some ware is thicker than others, and thereby prevents the ware from being smashed.

For'centering the ware on the lifting plate before it is raised, three vertical pins 10 ar disposed at equally spaced intervals around the late. The pins are mounted on the outer ends of arms 'Il projecting laterally from short vertical shafts 12 that are oscillatably mounted in a bearing ring 13 fastened to the top of the housing around the tubular bearing 50. The lower ends of these shafts carry pinions 14 that mesh with a gear 15 journaled on the tubular bearing. When this gear is rotated a short distance it turns the pinions and thereby, through arms H, swings the vertical pins 10 either inwardly or outwardly relative to the center of the lifting plate. When they are swung inwardly, one or two of them engage the ware resting on the plate and shift it laterally until it strikes the remaining pin or pins and is centered relative to the mask above it.

As shown in Fig. 6, to oscillate gear for this purpose, a rod 11 is pivotally connected to it at one end with the other end of the rod extending away from it at a tangent and through one end of a crank 18 that is oscillatably mounted on a pin 19 depending from the top of the housing. The other arm of the crank carries a tapered member 8| that is periodically engaged by a roller 82 affixed to a disc 83 rigidly mounted on the side shaft. When this roller strikes the ta- ,pered' member it swings the crank and thereby pulls rod 11 to turn,the gear. In case the gear does not turn as far as usual, due'to the centering pins engaging a piece of ware that i lightly oversize, the ware will not be broken by the pins because the crank will slide on the rod against the compression of a coil spring 84 also mounted thereon. As soon as roller 82 leaves the crank the gear is returned to its original position, in which the pins are spread apart, by a spring'85 connected to the bottom of the housing cover and tolthe outer end of a third arm 86 that projects from the crank. The centering of the ware occurs while the lifting plate is in its lower position, and the centering pins swing away from the surface of the annular portion or-shoulder of the ware projecting from the mask. As shown in Fig. 3, this is done by means of a spray nozzle 88 adjustably mounted on a vertically adjustable rod 89 supported at its lower end by a bracket 90 attached to the side of the housing. A spray booth is formed around the ware by a casing 9| mounted on top of the housing. Excess spray is drawn down through an exhaust duct 92 extending from the open bottom of the casing down through the'housing.

Rotation of the ware while it is being sprayed may be effected conveniently by a friction wheel 94 adjustably mounted in a block 95 secured to ring 41 that is mounted on center casting 5, as shown in Figs, 1 and 3. This wheel, which frictionally engages wheel 32 on the spindle at the banding station, is rotated by a pulley 96 that is driven by a belt 91 from another pulley 98 mounted on the upper end of a vertical shaft 99. This shaft is journaled in a bearing I00 in ring 41 and extends down through another bearing IOI in the top of the housing. The lower end of the shaft inside the housing carries a pulley I02 (Figs. 3 and 4) that is driven by a belt I03 from a pulley I04 keyed on side shaft 9. As a spindle moves into the spray booth its wheel 32 frictionally engages the constantly rotating wheel 94, whereby the mask and ware are rotated while being sprayed.

The spray is operated only while ware is in'the spray booth and rotating. The spray is turned off and on by a valve I06, shown in Fig. 1, mounted on top of the housing. This valve, which is in the air line III! of the spray, preferably is the type disclosed in my Patent No. 2,241,772 to which reference is made for a detailed description of it. As shown in Fig. 4, the valve is operated by a shaft I08 extending down into the housing and carrying at'its lower end a sprocket I09 driven by a chain 0 from a sprocket III near the lower end of the side shaft. The chain engages an idler sprocket II2 on center shaft 3. I The times at which the spray is turned on and off are selected by adjusting handles I I 3 projecting from the control valve.

After bending, the ware is indexed to a station that, may be idle, or one at which something, such as lining, is performed. An extra drivin pulley II4 for rotating the ware at such a station is shown in the drawings. From there the Ware is indexed to the unloading station, but before arriving there the friction wheel on the spindle engages a stationary brake block II5, shown in Fig. 1, supported by spring members I I8 attached to ring 41. The brake stops rotation of the spindle. When the ware reaches the unloading station the vacuum valve connected to that spindle is automatically opened and the ware drops into tions can be performed on the ware as it is carried along by the belt.

The next time the table turns. it carries the mask, that hasjust released a piece or ware at the unloading station, into the end of an arcuate tunnel-like casing I20 that forms a cleaning chamber. This casing has small openings at its opposite ends and a narrow opening along its top for passage of the spindle into, through, and out of the cleaning chamber. When table 20 comes to rest with a mask at the first station in the cleaning chamber, the mask is sprayed with water from a tube I2I. At that time the mask is rotated by a friction wheel I22 (Fig. 1) engaging wheel 32 of the supporting spindle, Wheel I22 is journaled in a bearing I23 mounted on ring 41. At the next station in the cleaning chamber the mask may be sprayed again or it may merely rotate to throw off the water. Rotation is efiected by a friction wheel I24 journaled in a bearing I25. At the following station, which is just before the mask leaves the cleaning chamber, water is blown off the mask by an air jet I26 while the mask is rotated by a friction wheel I21 journaled in a bearing I28. This wheel is mounted on the upper end of a shaft I29 that extends down through the top of the housing where it carries a pulley I3I that is driven by a belt I32 from a pulley I33 on shaft 9. Directly below wheel I2! is a pulley I34 connected by a belt I35 to one of a pair of pulleys I36 attached to wheel I24. The other pulley of the pair is connected by a belt I31 to a. pulley I38 carried by wheel I22. Thus, all three friction wheels above the cleaning chamber are driven from shaft 29. As the cleaned and dried mask leaves the chamber the spindle wheel 32 engages a brake block I39 supported by spring -members I40 from ring 41. The brake stops the spinning of the mask so that it is stationary when it arrives back at the loading station ready to receive a new piece of ware from the lifting plate.

' In using this machine an operator at the loading station places a piece of dinnerware upon lifting plate 51 while the latter is in its lower position, as indicated in Fig. 2. While this is h'appening, the Geneva mechanism is turning table 20 to move a clean mask from cleaning chamber I20 into position above the lifting plate. By the time the table comes to rest the roller 82, carried by disc 83, strikes the projection 8| on crank 13 of the centering device and thereby swings the crank on its pivot as shown in Fig. 6. This causes the crank to pull rod H and thereby turn gear I5 a short distance. The gear turns the three pinions I4 and thereby swing centering pins 10- inwardly to engage the plate, as shown in Fig. l, and center it on the lifting plate. Roller 82 immediately leaves projection 8|, so the crank, pulled by spring 85, turns the gear back to its original position in order to swing the centering pins away from the ware. By this time the high part of cam 65 has reached roller 62 by which the lifting plate is elevated to raise the ware up against the; mask 23 above it, as shown in Fig. 5.

Just as the ware reaches the mask the lever 50 is swung outwardly by cam groove 54 so that the adjacent vertical shaft 45 is turned in order to swing the adjoining arm 44 at its upper end to the left as viewed in Fig. 1. The arm at this time has become engaged by the closure member 43 of the vacuum valve above it, and this member is therefore pushed to the left to close opening 42 of the valve and to connect the spindle side'of: pipe 36 with the other side of the valve which is in communication with thevacuum pump. This connects the vacuum pump with the space between the mask and ware and immediately reduces. the, air pressure in that. space so that the warels'heldtightly against the mask (Fig. 7) .where it remains when the lifting plate is lowered; The slight flexibility of the mask permits its edge to conform. to the upper-surface of. the ware and form a seal. As the seal must be substantially perfect in order for theware to be supported by the mask, the edge of the mask must tightly engage the ware whereby any of the coating material that is sprayed on later will be prevented from getting under the mask. 1

As soon as the lifting'plate is lowered, the table is indexed to carry the ware to the nextstation' and to bring a new mask over the lifting .plate so that a new piece of ware may be applied-to it in the manner just described. a

The next time the table is indexed the first piece of ware is moved into the spray booth 8| where it is rotated through the frictional engagement of spindle wheel 32 with the constantly rotating friction wheel 94, as shown in Figs. 1' and" 3.. As soon as the table comes to rest withthe 1 ware rotating in the spray booth, the air control valve I06 (Fig. 1) opens the air line tospray gun "and thus starts the spraying'of coating upon the upper surface of the ware projecting beyond the mask. Of course, the mask effectively prevents the coating from reaching the masked central portion of the ware. Before the table starts to move again, valve I06 shuts off the airsupply .to the spray gun and thusstopsthe spray:

ing so that there is no waste.

The table then moves the banded ware to the next: station and carries an unbanded piece of ware from the second station intotl'ie 'spray booth. The banded ware still will be rotating; due to momentum, but when the table is next indexed the spindle wheel 32 above the rotating banded ware will engage brake block H5 (Fig. 1) and stop rotating before it reaches the unloading .station. At the same time that .the vacuum valve connected to a spindle at the'loading station is closed, the vacuum valve connected to the spin-* dle at the unloading station is opened in the same manner to connect the? spindle side-ofthe ad mask, that has just released a piece of ware, into a as the cleaning chamber 120. At the first *station" inside the chamber the mask and its supporting spindle are rotated by friction wheel I22 (Fig; l) a while a jet of water fromtube l2l washes fromthe mask the coating material that'wassprayed upon it in the spray booth. The table is then indexed to carry the mask to the-middle station" in the cleaning chamber where the mask is rapid ly rotated by friction wheel I24 (Figs. 1 and 3).

stationary mask.

before the. mask reachesth'e' loading 'station'i in scribed.

readiness fora repetitionoffthe cycle just- 1e;

For'anarticle, such asa cup, that*isftohave a band applied toits outer or lower surfac'ejthetype of mask shown in'Fi'g. 8 is used." In thl ehf;

bodlment the bottom of 'the head lso mounted on the lower end of the 'rotatable "hollow spindle shaftxl Si is providedwith an annular recess close to the shaft. Mounted in this recessis a resilient annular sealingimember I52 thatis engaged by the foot of acup I53 formed between themfromwhlch air is*-'evacuatedrin orderto hold the cup against the heath The mask that shields the-part' of the cup that is not tobe -c'oatedis formed -from a ring I54 of resilient -material,-1such .as rubber, which is 'attached to the-bottom of the thead outside of the sealingring. This mask'hasa' thin lip that engages the .cup andconfor'ms 'to' its surface even though in'some casesthering must fit over the lowerportion qof thezcup handle; Heads and masks of this character for usewith cups, bowls, and thelike are carriedbyanindex table the same as. described. herein. :In the spray booth a" coating issprayedon-rthe outer'surfac'e of such ware below-the mask. V

Accor in -to the provisions'of the patent statutes, I have explained the principle and construction. of my invention. and have illustratedand" described what. I now consider to represent its best embodiment, However, I- desire to have it understood that,-withln the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise seal with the .surface ofthe ware, means for re-- ducing thefair pressure abovethe ware to hold the ware'againstsaid mask, and means for. spraying acoating on the masked side of; the ware projecting, from said mask, .saidmask shielding,

the masked areav of the. warelfrom saidcoating,

2. A dinnerware bandin machine comprising a mask of impervious material for a piece of ware,

the edge of themask being capable of forming an air seal with the surface of the ware, means for reducing the airpressure above the ware to hold the ware againstthe mask mean's for ro tating the mask, means" forsjpraying a coating' on the masked 'side of the ware projecting'fromihe' mask, "said mask shielding themasked area ojrf p in rotation of the mask, and means for restoring the ware from said "coating,"means for said air pressure to release the ware from the 3. Adinnerware banding machine comprising a mask ofimpervious material for the center of a piece of ware,'the edge of the mask being capable of forming'a'n air:seal;with the surfaceof the ware, .means for reducing-the air pressure between the mask and ware to hold the mask against Centrifugal.force'throwsmost of the water off the mask, but' at the last station in the cleaningchamber, where the mask is-rotated by frictionwheel I21, the removal of the water is aided by a jet of air' from tube I26. By the time the ma'skf leaves the chamber it is clean and dry. As it leaves the chamber the spindle wheel 32 engages brake block |38-by whichits rotation is stoppedfi the ware, -means for spraying a coating on the ware aroundthemask, means forrestoring. said air pressure to release the mask from the ware,

means forcleaning.themask to remove the coatingj' sprayed' on itsedge, andintermittently movingmeans for carryin gthemask from said spraying means to said" cleaning means andback again.

4. A dinnerware banding, machine comprising a a hollow vertical spindle, a' concave mask of impervious material secured to thelower en 'dv of the spindle and having a central opening communiso'that a small space is eating with the inside of the spindle, the edge of the mask being capable of forming an air seal with the surface of a piece of ware, suction means connected to the upper end of the spindle for holding apiece of ware against the edge of the mask, means for rotating the spindle, and means for spraying a coating on top of the projecting portion of ware carried by the rotating mask while the central area of the ware is shielded from said coating by the mask. 1

5. A dinnerware banding machine comprising a hollow vertical spindle, aconcave mask of impervious material secured to the lower end of the spindle and having a central opening communieating with the inside of the spindle, the edge of the mask being capable of forming an air seal with the surface of a piece of ware, suction means connected to the upper end of the spindle for holding the top of a piece of ware against the edge of the mask, means for rotating the spindle, means for spraying a coating on top of the projecting portion of ware carried by the rotating mask, means for stopping rotation of the spindle, means for admitting atmospheric pressure to the spindle to cause the sprayed ware to drop from the mask, means for again rotating the spindle, means for cleaning the rotating mask to remove the coating sprayed on its edge, and means for stopping rotation of the spindle before said suction is applied again.

6. A dinnerware banding machine comprising a mask of impervious material and having a cen-' tral opening and adapted to cover the center of a piece of ware, the edge of the mask being capable of forming an air seal with the surface of the ware, suction means communicating with said central opening, a ware support below the mask, means for moving a piece of ware laterally on said support to center it relative to the mask above, means for raising the support to place the ware against the mask where it is held by suction, means for moving the mask laterally away from said support, and means for applying a coating to the portion of the ware projecting from said mask.

7. A dinnerware banding machine comprising a mask of impervious material and having a central opening and adapted to cover the center of the spindle, and means for spraying a coating around the rotating mask on ware carried thereby.

9. A dinnerware banding machine comprising a hollow spindle, a concave mask of impervious material secured to one end of the spindle and having a central opening communicating with the inside of the spindle, the edge of the mask being capable of forming an air seal with the surface of a piece of ware, suction means connected to the other end of the spindle for holding a piece of ware against the edge of the mask, a friction wheel rigidly mounted on the spindle, a constantly rotating friction wheel, means for periodically bringing said wheels into frictional engagement with each other whereby to rotate the spindle, means for spraying a coating around the rotating mask on ware carried thereby, and a stationary friction member adapted tobe engaged periodically by said spindle friction wheel to stop the rotation of the spindle.

10. A dinnerware banding machine comprising a mask of impervious material for the center of a piece of ware, the edge of the mask being capable of forming an air seal with the surface of the ware, means for reducing the air pressure between the mask and ware to hold the mask against the ware, means for spraying a coating on the ware around the mask, means for restoring said I air pressure to release the mask from the ware,

a piece of ware, the edge of'the mask being capa-.

ble of forming an air seal with the surface of the ware, suction means communicating with said central opening, a ware support below the mask, laterally movable vertical centering pins beside said support, means for periodically moving said pins inwardly toward the support to engage a piece of ware and center it thereon relative to the mask above, means for raising the support to place the ware against the mask where it is held by suction, means for moving the mask laterally away from said support, and means for applying a coating to the portion ofthe ware projecting from said mask.

8. A dinnerware banding machine comprising a hollow spindle, a concave mask of impervious material secured to one end of the spindle and having a central opening communicating with the inside of the spindle, the edge of the mask being capable of forming an air seal withthe surface of a piece of ware, suction means connected to the other end of the spindle for holding a piece of ware against the edge of the mask, a wheel rigidly mounted on the spindle, constantly moving friction means, means for periodically bringing said wheel and friction means into frictional engagement with each other whereby to rotate means for washing the mask to remove the coating sprayed on its edge, means for rotating the wet mask, means for blowing a fluid on the rotating mask, means for stopping rotating of the mask before another piece of ware is applied to it, and mechanism for indexing the mask from one of said means to the next in succession.

11. A dinnerware banding machine comprising a mask of impervious material and having a cen- .tral opening and adapted to cover the center of a a piece of ware, the edge of the mask being capable of forming an air seal with the ware, suction means communicating with said central opening, a ware support below the mask, laterally movable vertical centering pins beside said support, means for periodically moving said pins inwardly toward the support to engage a piece of ware and center it thereon relative to the mask above, a cam for raising the support to place the ware against the mask where it is held by suction, means for continuously rotating said cam, means operated from said cam-rotating means for actuating said pinmoving means, means for moving the mask laterally away from said support, and means for applying a coating to the -portion of the ware projecting from said mask.

12. A dinnerware banding machine comprising a mask of impervious material and having a central opening and adapted to cover the center of a piece of ware, the edge of the mask being capable of forming an air sea] with the ware, suction means communicating with said central opening, a ware support below the mask, means for moving a piece of ware laterally on said support to center it relative to the mask above, continuously rotating means for periodically raising said support to place the ware against the mask where it is held by suction, means for moving the mask laterally away from said support, means operated from said continuously rotating means for periodically rotating the mask, and means for spraying a coating on the portion of the ware projecting from said rotating mask.

13. A dinnerware banding machine comprising a mask of impervious material and having a central opening and adapted to cover the center of a piece of ware, the edge of the mask being capable of forming an air seal with the ware, suction means communicating with said central opening, a ware support below the mask, means for moving a piece of ware laterally on said support to center it relative to the mask above, continuously rotating means for periodically raising said support to place the ware against the mask where it is held by suction, means for moving the mask laterally away from said support, means operated from said continuously rotating means for controlling said suction means, and means for applying a coating to the portion of the were projecting from said mask.

14. A dinnerware banding machine comprising a horizontal table, a plurality of hollow spindles depending from the table at circumferentially spaced points, a mask of impervious material secured to the lower end of each spindle and having a central opening communicating with the inside of the spindle, means for periodically rotating the table to index the masks from station to station, means at a loading station for applying a piece of ware to the mask above it, the edge of the mask'being capable of forming an air seal with the surface of the ware, suction means connected to the upper ends of the spindles to hold ware against the masks, means for rotating the ware, means at another station for spraying a coating on top of the projecting portion of the ware carried by the rotating masks, and means for. admitting atmospheric pressure to the spin-- dies at a later station to release the ware.

15. A cup banding machine comprising a hollow vertical spindle, a head mounted on the lower end of the spindle and having a central opening communicating with the inside of the spindle,-

a resilient ring carried by said head and encircling said opening, suction means connected to the upper end of the spindle forholding the foot of a cup against said ring, a resilient ring of larger diameter than said first-mentioned ring but concentric therewith and carried by said head for engaging the side of the cup to form a. mask, meansfor rotating the spindle, and means for spraying a coating on the cup below said mask.

16. A dinnerware banding machine comprising a support, a post projecting downwardly therefrom, a cup-like member rotatably mounted on the lower portion of the post, means sealing the space between the top of said member and the post, a hollow shaft projecting downwardly from the bottom of said member to which it is rigidly connected, a mask of impervious material secured to the lower end of the shaft and having a central opening communicating with the inside of the shaft, the edge of the mask being capable of forming an air seal with the surface of a piece of ware. said post having an axial passage extending from its lower end up to a radial opening in the post above said cup-like member, suction means connected to said radial opening for holding a piece of ware against the edge of the mask, means for rotating said cup-like member, and means for applying a coating around the rotating mask on ware carried thereby.

17. A dinnerware decorating machine comprising a mask for shielding the center of a piece of ware, automatic means for centering ware relative to the mask, means for moving the centered ware against the mask, means for spraying the masked side of the ware around the mask, and means for releasing sprayed ware from the mask.

18. A dinnerware decorating machine comprising a mask for shielding the center of a piece of ware temporarily supported thereby, means for centering ware relative to the mask, means for rotating the mask, means for spraying the masked side of the were around the rotating mask, and means for automatically releasing the decorated ware from the mask.

19. A dinnerware banding machine comprising a horizontal table, a plurality of hollow spindles depending from the table at circumferentially spaced points, a mask of impervious material secured to the lower end of each spindle and having a central opening communicating with the inside of the spindle, means for intermittently rotating the table to index the masks from station to station, means at a loading station for centering a piece of ware relative to the mask above it, means atsaid loading station for raising the ware into engagement with the mask, the edge of the mask being capable of forming an air seal with the surface of the ware, suction means connected to the upper ends of the spindles to hold ware against the masks, means at another station forspraying a coating band on top of the projecting portion of the ware carried by the rotating masks, means at said spraying station for rotating the spindles, and means for admitting atmospheric pressure to the spindles at a later station to release the-banded ware.

20. A dinnerware banding machine comprising a horizontal table. a plurality of hollow spindles depending from the table at circumferentially spaced points, a mask of impervious material secured to the lower end of each spindle and having a central opening communicating with the inside of the spindle, means for intermittently rotating the table to index the masks from station to station, means at a loading stationfor centering a piece of ware relative to the mask above it, means at said loading station for raising the centered ware into engagement with the mask, the edge of the mask being capable of forming an air seal with the surface of the ware, suction means connected to the upper ends of the spindles to hold ware against the masks, means at another station'for spraying a coating band on top of the projecting portion of the ware carried by the rotating masks, means at said spraying station for rotating the spindles, means for admitting atmospheric pressure to the spindles at a later station to release the banded ware,

and mask-cleaning means located at a station beyond said releasing station, whereby each mask is cleaned before the table returns it to said loading station.

21. A dinnerwarebanding machine comprising a horizontal table, a plurality of hollow spindles depending from the table at circumferentially spaced points, a mask of impervious material secured to the lower end of each spindle and having a central opening communicating with the inside of the spindle, means for intermittently rotating the table to index the masks from station to station, means at a loading station for centering a piece of ware relative to the mask above it, means at said loading station for raising the ware into engagement with the mask, the edge of the mask being capable of forming an air seal with the surface of the ware, suction means connected to the upper ends of the spindles to hold ware against the masks, means at another station for spraying a coating band on top of the projecting portion of the ware carried by the rotating masks, means at said spraying station for rotating the spindles, means for admitting atmospheric pressure to the spindlesat a later station to release the banded ware, a casing mounted between said releasing station receiving said spindles, and means in said casing for cleaning the masks carried therethrough by the spindles.

22. A dinnerware decorating machine comprising an intermittently moving support, a mask carried thereby for shielding the center ot a ,piece of ware held against it, means for spraying a coating on the masked side of the ware around the mask, automatic means for releasing ware from the mask, and automatic means for cleaning the mask before it is returned by said support to said spraying means.

23. A dinnerware decorating machine comprising a p urality of spindles each provided with a central opening, a mask of impervious material at one end of each opening, the edge of the mask being capable of forming an air seal with the surface of a piece of ware, means for applying suction at the other end of each opening to hold ware against the masks, decorating means, means for intermittently moving the spindles and masks past the decorating means, automatic means for releasing decorated ware from the masks, a casand having an arcuate' ing through which the masks are moved by said intermittently moving means after they have released said ware, and

means in said casing for cleaning the mas WALTER H. EMERSON.

The following references are of record REFERENCES CITED in the m file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Date Peters Dec. 1, 1936 Schulze-Berge Apr. 28, 1885 Bennett et al. Apr. 2, 1940 Johnson June 4, 1940 Duggan June 16, 1942 Shurley Feb. 22, 1944 Von Hofe Sept. 1, 1942 Westin Dec. 27, 1938 Neuman Oct. 9, 1934 Marigold Jan. 9, 1923 Rouse June 17, 1930

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Classifications
U.S. Classification118/677, 118/DIG.300, 118/320, 101/44, 118/301, 118/319
International ClassificationB05B13/02, B28B11/00
Cooperative ClassificationB05B13/02, B28B11/001, Y10S118/03
European ClassificationB05B13/02, B28B11/00B