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Publication numberUS2426453 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 26, 1947
Filing dateDec 13, 1945
Priority dateDec 13, 1945
Publication numberUS 2426453 A, US 2426453A, US-A-2426453, US2426453 A, US2426453A
InventorsHuenergardt William H
Original AssigneeMilton Reynolds
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fountain pen
US 2426453 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 2G, 1947. w. H. HUENERGADT l 2,426,453

FOUNTAIN PEN lFiled Dc. 1s, 1945 type a cylindrical member Patented Aug. 26, 1947 2,426,453 FOUNTAIN PEN William H. Huenergardt, Chicago, Ill., assignor to Milton Reynolds, Chicago, Ill.

Application vDecember 13, 1945, Serial No. 634,742

(Cl. 1Z0-43) 5 Claims.

The present invention relates generally to fountain pens- More particularly the invention relates to that type of fountain pen which is known as a ball pointed pen and comprises an elongated tubular body which is adapted in connection with a writing operation to be held by the user inan upright position, has in its interior a column or mass of quick drying paste variety ink, embodies at its lower end a tip having a depending wall which forms an ink chamber in communication with the interior of the body and surrounds a freely rotatable ball for applying'ink over the writing surface by a rolling action, and has at its upper end a closure member which is removably secured in place by way of a reduced externally threaded stem and serves, when removed, to expose the upper end of the body in order that the latter may be recharged with ink.

As evidenced by United States patent application Serial No. 619,329, filed by me on September 29, 1945, it has heretofore been proposed to employ in a fountain pen of the aforementioned which fits slidably in the tubular body, theoretically rests on the co1- umn of ink and follows the ink downwards as the latter is consumed, is intended to prevent air in the upper end of the body from working itself into the ink and forming bubbles which, upon entry into the ink chamber in the tip, would preclude proper writing by the ball, and, in addition, is intended to preclude displacement of the mass of ink in the direction'of the upper end of the body when the pen is placed or laid on its side and thus prevents air from seeping into the ink chamber in the tip between the ball and its seat and causing an air-lock which would preclude writing on the part of the ball. Heretofore the cylindrical member has been formed of solid metal. In' practice it has been found that when the cylindrical member is formed of solid metal that has a higher specific gravity than the ink it does not serve or fulfill its intended purpose because it gradually moves by gravity downwards through the ink and when brought to rest near the tip blocks further flow of ink into the ink chamber.

The primary object of the instant invention is to provide a ball pointed fountain pen which is an improvement upon, and eliminates the defects of, previously designed pens of the same general character, including that of the aforementioned patent application, and is characterized by the fact that the cylindrical member, instead of being formed of solid metal, is hollow to the end that downwardly tapered annularl rstem of the removable closure member a wad which is formed of compressible fibrous material, such, for example, as felt and has a twofold purpose in that it serves to prevent dust and other foreign material from entering the body interior when the closure member is removed from its normal operative position, and, in addition, serves to prevent the ink in the body from creeping kupwards into the internal screw thread by capillary action and forming a lm which coats the external screw thread on the stem of the closure member and is extruded onto the outer surfaces of the body and closure member when the member, after removal, is again applied to the body.

A further object of the invention is to provide a ball pointed fountain pen which is simple in vdesign and construction and is highly efcient in operation.

Other objects of the invention and the various advantages and characteristics of the present fountain pen will be apparent from a consideration of the following detailed description.

The invention consists in the several novel features which are hereinafter set forth and are more particularly defined by claims at the conclusion hereof.

In the drawing which accompanies and forms a part of this specication or disclosure and in which like numerals of reference denote corresponding parts throughout the several views:

Figure 1 is a side view of a fountain pen embodying the invention;

Figure 2 is a longitudinal section of the pen, showing in detail the manner in which the cylindrical member floats on the column or mass of ink in the body of the pen;

Figure 3 is an enlarged longitudinal section of the cylindrical member, illustrating in detail the construction and designof such member; and

Figure 4 is an enlarged longitudinal section of the lower or tip end of the pen.

The fountain pen which is shown in the drawing constitutes the preferred form or embodiment of the invention and comprises as its principal parts or components an elongated tubular body 6, a tip 1, a ball 8, a float type cylindrical member 9, and a wad I0.

The body t is adapted in connection with a writing operation to be held by the user of the pen in an upright position and is preferably formed of any suitable material, such, for example, as aluminum. As shown in Figure 2 the interior of the body is shaped to dene a large sized cylindrical compartment Il, an ink duct I2 and a socket I3. The compartment II is formed in the central and upper end portions of the body and is adapted to be filled with a column or mass III of paste variety ink. The latter is preferably of the quick drying type and is introduced into the compar-tment I I through the upper end of the body 6. The upper end of the compartment extends through the upper Yend face of the body and is normally closed by a removable, elongated closure member I which when in its operative position forms a part of the body. As shown in Figure 3, the closure member I5 embodies at its lower end a reduced externally threaded stem I5 which is shaped to nt within the upper end of the body and coacts with an internal screw thread I1 on the upper end of the body. When the closure member is in place it serves to prevent outflow of ink through the upper end of the body. When it is desired to expose the upper end of the body in orderthat the latter may be recharged with ink the closure member I5 is removed by unscrewing it from the upper end of the pen body Si. The closure member is preferably upwardly tapered. As shown in the drawing, the diameter of the lower end of the closure member is the same as the external diameter of the upper end of the body. The duct I2 and the socket I3 are formed in the lower .end portion of the body. The duct is cylindrical and communicates with, and leads downwards from, the lower end of the compartment II. It is of materialll7 less diameter than the compartment and serves as hereinafter described to conduct ink from the compartment to the tip 1. The socket I3 communicates with, and leads downwards from, the low-er end of the duct I2 and extends through the lower end face of the body.

The tip 1 is located at the lower end of the body and is preferably formed of steel or like hard durable metal. It -is circular in cross section and embodies at its upper end an upwardly tapered stem I8 which is shaped conformably to, and is driven into connected relation with, the socket I3 in the lower end of the Vpen body 6. The lower end of the tip is downwardly tapered and embodies an integral annular wall I9, which defines an ink chamber 2D. The latter is in communication with, and receives ink from, the duct I2 by way of a duct 2l which, as best shown in Figure 5, is formed in the central portion of the tip 1, extends downwards from the lower end of the duct Z-l and opens onto the central upper portion of the ink chamber 2). The lower end of the annular wall I9 of the tip 1 defines a circular seat 22. When the pen is in use ink iiows from the compartment I'I downwards into the ink chamber 2S via the ducts I2 and 2l. The lower end of the body 6 is downwardly tapered and has substantially the same external contour as the closure member I5.

The ball 8 is truly spherical and is preferably formed of steel. It is disposed for the most part in the ink chamber 2li, as shown in Figure 5, and is arranged so that the portion thereof beneath its center rests slidably against'the circular seat 22 at the lower end of the annular downwardly tapered wall I9 of the tip 1. The seat 22 serves to retain the ball rotatably in place with the upper portion thereof in sliding engagement with the lower end of the duct 2l. In connection with a writing operation the ball 8 rolls over the writing surface and applies ink to the surface from the ink chamber 2G. The ink by reason of the fact that it is in paste form has pronounced lubricating properties with the result that the ball is freely rotatable.

The cylindrical member 9 is mounted for free sliding movement in the upper end of the cylindrical compartment II and floats on the column or mass of ink in the body. It is hollow, as shown in Figure 3, and has a twofold purpose in that it prevents air in the upper end of the body from working itself into the ink and forming bubbles, and in addition precludes displacement of the mass of ink in the direction of the closure member I5 when the pen is placed or laid on its side. Preferably the member 9 is formed of light weight metal, such, for example, as aluminum. As shown in Figure 3 the member 9 comprises an inverted cup-shaped part 23 and a disc 24. The cup shaped part 23 consists of a circular top wall 25 and a depending cylindrical skirt 2t. The skirt has its upper end connected to the marginal portion of the circular top wall 25 and embodies at its lower end an internal annular groove 21. The external diameter of the skirt of the iioat type cylindrical member 9 is slightly less than the diameter of the ink compartment II in the upper and central portions of the body 6 in order that the cylindrical member 9 is free to slide lengthwise of the compartment. The upper end of the groove 21 in the lower end of the cylindrical skirt`26 is defined by an annular downwardly facing shoulder 28. The disc 24 serves as a closure for the lower end of the inverted cup-shaped part 23 and nts snugly with in the groove 21. As shown in Figure 3 the marginal portion of the disc abuts against the annular downwardly facing shoulder 28. The lower end of the skirt 26 Vis crimped around and under the marginal portion of the disc 24 in order that the disc is i'ixedly secured or held in place. As a result of the fact that the cylindrical member 9 is hollow the member as a wh'ole actually iioats on the column or mass of ink in the cylindrical ink compartment II and does not in response to the action of gravity Work its way down into the ink. It is contemplated that when the pen is originally charged with ink the compartment I I will only be partially filled. After charge of the compartment to the desired extent the cylindrical member 9 is inserted into the upper end of the body and is then slid downwards until the bottom face thereof is in engagement with the column or mass of ink. Because of the adhesive tendency of the ink the float type Ycylin drical member 9 adheres to the upper end of the mass of ink and follows the ink downwards as the latter is consumed in connection with use or writing of the pen. When the cylindrical member 9 is in place it seals the column or mass of ink against contact with the air in the upper end of the tubular body 6 and h'ence no air is permitted to work itself in bubble form into the ink. As heretofore pointed out, the oat type cylindrical member follows and adheres to the ink and prevents Vdislodgement of the ink in the direction of the closure member when the pen is laid or placed on its side or positioned with the tip at the top. By preventing or precluding displacement of the ink in the direction of the closure member when the pen is laidon its side there is no tendency for air to seep into the ink chamber 20 in the tip and result in an air-lock which would preclude the ilow of ink into the ink compartment and resultant failure of the ball in the tip to write. The height of thickness of the disc 24 is less than the height of the groove 2l and h'ence the metal at the lower end of the skirt that is crimped around and yunder the marginal portion of the disc denes with the lower face of the disc a shallow cavity 29. By reason of the fact that this cavity is present the ink works into the cavity when the cylindrical member is shifted into place and because of its adhesive properties effects such an adhesive bond with the cylindrical member that the latter is caused substantially positively to follow the ink downwards as it is consumed. The inner face of the crimped metal, due to crimping, is upwardly flared with the result that the margin of the cavity '29 is undercut and hence the paste variety ink at the top of the column interlocks with the cavity so as to cause the float type member and the ink column to be locked or connected together. The circular top wall 25 of the inverted cup sh'aped part 23 of the float type cylindrical member is provided with an upstanding centrally disposed handle 30 whereby the member 9 may be gripped in connection with its insertion into and removal from the body. Preferably the handle is in' the form of an enlarged head 3| which is joined to the central portion of the circular top wall 25 by a reduced neck 32. Because of the shape of the component parts of th'e handle the handle may begripped by a tweezers having the ends of the nibs thereof turned inwards.

The wad I is cylindrical or disc-like and fits snugly within the upper end of the tubular body 6 at a point directly beneath the lower end of the internal screw thread I'I. It is formed of compressible fibrous material, such, for example, as felt, and serves not only to prevent dust from entering the body and contacting the ink when the removable closure member is removed from the body but also to prevent the ink in the body from creeping upwards by capillary action and forming a film on the screw thread I1. If a lm of ink were formed on the screw thread I 1 it would coat the externally threaded stem I 6 on the lower end of the closure member I and result in ink being extruded onto the outer surfaces of the body and closure member when the member, after removal from the body, is again screwed onto the body. The diameter of the wad I0 is preferably greater than the internal diameter of the body in order that the wad when inserted into place is compressed. By reason of the fact that the wad is formed of fibrous material it does not prevent inflow of air into the body interior upon removal of the closure member I5. Actually the wad permits air in the upper end of the body to circulate past it into the space above the float type member 9.

The herein described ball pointed fountainv pen is highly eflicient in operation due to the fact that it includes the cylindrical float type member 9 and the wad I0.

The invention is not to be understood as restricted to the details set forth since these may be modified within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

Having thus described the invention what I claim as new and desire to secure' by Letters Patent is:

1. In a fountain pen comprising a tubular body adapted in connection with a normal writing operation to be held in an upstanding position, having the interior thereof cylindrical and adapted to hold a partial filling of paste variety ink, embodying at its upper end vent means, provided at its lower end with a freely rotatable spherical ball for'applying the ink to a writing surface, a hollow, cylindrical float type follower of but slightly less diameter than the interior of the body, mounted in the body so that it is free to slide from one end thereof to the other, adapted in response solely to the action of gravity and the pressure of the superjacent air in the body to follow the ink downwards during normal writing of the pen, further adapted when the pen is placed on its side to prevent displacement of the ink in the direction of the normal upper end of the body, and consisting of an inverted cupshaped part, and a disc-like part tting within the lower end of the skirt of the cup-shaped part, said lower end of the skirt being crimped around the margin of the disc-like part so that it secures the latter in place and having the inner periphery thereof upwardly ilared'so that it together with the bottom face of said disc-like member 'denes a shallow concentric undercut cavity for receiving `and interfitting with a portion of the upper end of the ink filling.

2. In a fountain pen comprising a tubular body adapted in connection with anormal writing operation to be held in an upstanding position, having the interior thereof cylindrical and adapted to hold a partial filling of paste variety ink, embodying at its upper end vent means, and provided at its lower end with a freely rotatable ball for applying the ink to a writing surface, a hollow, cylindrical follower of but slightly less diameter than the interior of the body, embodying a circular top wall and a depending skirt, mounted in the body so that it is free to slide from one end thereof to the other, adapted in response solely to the action of gravity and the pressure of the superjacent air in the body to follow the ink downwards during normal writing of the pen, and further adapted when the pen is placed on its side to prevent displacement of the ink in the direction of the normal upper end of the body.

3. In a fountain pen comprising a tubular body adapted in connection with a normal writing operation to be held in an upstanding position, having the interior thereof adapted to be partially charged with paste variety ink, embodying at its upper end vent means and also a removable closure member, and provided at its lower end with a freely rotatable ball for applying the ink to a writing surface, a wad of compressible fibrous material compressed laterally and held frictionally within the upper end of the tubular body at a point substantially directly beneath the removable closure member and above the ink and adapted to prevent the ink from working its way to the vent means while at the same time permitting air from said vent means to ow through it into the space above the ink.

4. In a fountain pen comprising a tubular body adapted in connection with a normal writing operation to be held in an upstanding position, having the interior thereof cylindrical and adapted to be partially charged with paste variety ink, embodying vent means at its upper end, and provided at its lower end with a freely rotatable ball for applying the ink to a writing surface, a hollow cylindrical follower of but slightly less diameter than the interior of the body mounted in the body so that it is free to slide from one end thereof to the other, arranged and adapted to float Von top of the mass of ink without appreciable penetration and also in response solely to the action of gravity and the pressure of the superjacent air in the body to follow the ink downwards during normal writing of the pen, and further adapted when the pen is placed on its side to preventv displacement of the ink in the direction of said upper end of the body, and a wad of com-y pressible brous material compressed laterally and held frictionally within the upper end of the tubular body at a point above the follower but beneath the vent means and adapted to prevent the. ink from working its way to said vent means by capillary action while at the same time permitting air from the vent means to flo-w through it into the space above the follower.

5. In a fountain pen comprising a tubular bodl7 adapted in connection with a normal writing operation to be held in an opstanding position, having the interior thereof cylindrical and adapted to be partially charged with paste variety ink, embodying vent means at its upper end, and provided at its lower end with a freely rotatable ball for applying ink to a writing surf ace, an oversized cylindrical Wad of felt material tting snugly Within the upper end of the tubular body at a 8 point beneath the vent means and above the ink and adapted to prevent the inkfrom working its way to the vent means while at the same time permitting air from said Vent means to ow through it into the space above the ink.

WILLIAM H. HUENERGARDT.

REFERENCES CITED rIhe following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US587032 *Oct 17, 1896Jul 27, 1897 Fountain-pen
US982922 *Nov 20, 1909Jan 31, 1911Frank M AshleyFountain-pen.
US1030502 *Oct 17, 1910Jun 25, 1912George Heber CarterFountain-pen.
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2492058 *Oct 4, 1947Dec 20, 1949O'connor Arthur FFountain pen
US2551490 *Jan 23, 1947May 1, 1951Scripto IncBall point pen
US2552506 *Dec 21, 1945May 8, 1951Eversharp IncWriting instrument
US2557409 *Nov 7, 1945Jun 19, 1951Scripto IncFountain pen
US2565556 *Apr 19, 1947Aug 28, 1951Brown & BigelowBall point fountain pen
US2598493 *Jun 30, 1947May 27, 1952Gold Bros IncBall-type lipstick applicator
US2603186 *Jun 19, 1946Jul 15, 1952Brown & BigelowWriting instrument
US2606529 *Jul 12, 1950Aug 12, 1952Verrinder Wagner ErnestReservoir pen
US2678634 *Oct 26, 1946May 18, 1954Jens Henriksen Ernst JohanWriting instrument
US2730993 *Jan 6, 1951Jan 17, 1956Ritepoint Pen And Pencil CompaInk reservoir for ball point pen
US2930062 *Dec 3, 1958Mar 29, 1960Tri Chem IncBall type applicators
US3056194 *Dec 23, 1955Oct 2, 1962Kahn David IncMethod of assembling a follower film in the cartridge of a ball point pen
US6361234Mar 8, 2000Mar 26, 2002Bic CorporationPressurized writing instrument employing a compressible piston member
DE900909C *Jun 22, 1950Jan 4, 1954Compania Uruguaya De Fomento IKugelschreiber
DE951197C *Apr 3, 1953Oct 25, 1956Jean Pierre GrafKugelschreiber
DE966556C *Apr 12, 1949Aug 22, 1957Henry George MartinSchreibgeraet mit Kugelspitze
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/141, 401/217
International ClassificationB43K7/08, B43K1/08, B43K1/00, B43K7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB43K1/08, B43K7/08
European ClassificationB43K1/08, B43K7/08