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Publication numberUS2428070 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 30, 1947
Filing dateNov 29, 1945
Priority dateNov 29, 1945
Publication numberUS 2428070 A, US 2428070A, US-A-2428070, US2428070 A, US2428070A
InventorsVictor Frenkil
Original AssigneeVictor Frenkil
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Foundation pile
US 2428070 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

2 sheets-sheet 1 V. FRENKu.

FOUNDATION PILE Filed Nov. 29, 1945 Sept. 30, 1947.

Sgm. 3o, 1947.

v. FRENKIL FOUNDATION PILEl Filedl Nov. 29', 1945 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Sept. 30, 1947 UNITED STATESPATENT CFFICE FOUNDATION PILE Victor Frenkil, Baltimore, Md. y Application November 29, 1945, Serial No. 631,567

7 Claims.

This invention relates to foundation piles and more particularly to piles incorporating a Steel beam having its upper end encased in concrete.

Prior to the instant invention, steel beam piles have been installed with concrete encasements about the upper portions thereof, but the installation of the concrete encasement has been relatively complicated involving the use of considerable special equipment and labor. It also has been found in the past that considerable care has been necessary lin the fabrication of the concrete encasement about the steel beam if the concrete encasement is to be installed without failure. Such prior installations usually involved the bringing of steel shells and/or other special equipment to the job, which steel shells or other special equipment served as molds or mold portions for the concrete encasement.

It is an object of the instant invention to 'teach a novel method of installing steel beam piles having their upper portions encased in concrete.

It is another object of the instant invention to provide prefabricated concrete encasements for steel beam piles.

Other objects and the nature and advantages of the instant invention will be apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure 1 is a vertical sectional view with parts shown in elevation of a pile installed in accordance with the instant invention;

Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. 1 showing the steel beam installed and the concrete encasement about to be installed;

Fig. 3 is a horizontal sectional view taken along line 3-3 of Fig. 2 and looking inthe direction of the arrows;

Fig. 4 is a horizontal sectional view taken along line 4--4 of Fig. 1 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 5 is a bottom view of the steel beam and concrete encasement shown in Fig. 2;

Fig. 6 is a horizontal sectional view taken along line Vli-li of Fig. l and looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 7 is a view in vertical elevation of a modied form of pile and encasement construction;

Fig. 8 is a bottom view of the pile shown in Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 is a view similar to Fig. 7 but showing a modified construction;

Fig. 10 is a view similar to Fig. 8 but relating to the pile construction shown in Fig. 9;

Fig. 11 is a view similar to Figs. 7 and 9 but of a modified construction;

Fig. 12 is a view similar to Figs. 8 and 10 but relating to the construction shown in Fig. 11;

Fig. 13 is a view similar to Figs. 7, 9 and 11 but of a modified construction; and

Fig. 14 is a view similar to Figs. 8, 10 and 12 but relating to the construction shown in Fig. 13.

Referringy to Figures 1-6 inclusive, the steel beam 2l) is driven through the mud 2| below the water 22 to the proper depth which may be reached when a predetermined blow from the pile driver causes no further sinking or lowering of the steel beam. The precast concrete encasement element 23 is then slipped over the steel beam 20 as shown in Fig. 2 and lowered or driven into the position shown in Fig. 1.

The precast or prefabricated concrete encasement element 23 may comprise an integral casting of generally cylindrical form including a tapered nose portion 24 and a tubular body portion 25 the inner wall 26 of which is spaced from the steel beam 20 to provide a compartment which may be filled with concrete C to be cast in situ in order that the steel beam and the concrete encasement element may become an integral unit as shown in Fig. 1 with the steel beam 2U passing entirely through the concrete encasement element 23 and the encasement element extending from a point below the mud line at its lower end 2l to a point above the water level at its upper end 28. The tapered nose portion 24 may comprise a solid mass of concrete having an opening passing vertically therethrough of a shape the section of which corresponds to the sectional shape of the steel beam so that when the steel beam is of H section, as shown in the drawings, the opening through the tapered nose portion A24 will also be H shape in section. sizes of the opening passing through the tapered nose portion 24 and the section of the H beam may be such that the opening will be larger than the section of the beam by the amount of tolerance necessary to facilitate the passing of the encasement element 23 over the beam 20 in a telescopic manner. The height of the nose portion 24 may be such as will insure a good bearing or guiding action as the encasement element is passed telescopically over the beam into place whereby the space between the inner wall 26 and the surface of the steelbeam will be substantially even in all horizontal planes throughout the length of the encasement element.

The pouring of the concrete C, which is to be cast in situ between the inner wall 26 of the body portion 25 of the encasement 23 and the steel beam 20, may begin when the encasement is The relative A lowered into a position wherein the lower end 21 thereof is at the water level and may be completed when the encasement has been lowered to the lposition in Fig. l, or sooner. The concrete may be ladled or otherwise poured or inserted through the opening in the top of the encasement 23 and as it reaches the top wall 29 of the nose portion 24 which forms the bottom Wall of the space about the steel beam 20 and within the inner wall 26 of the encasement 23, it will seal the steel beam 2D within the encasement 23 and prevent the entrance of Water or mud into the encasement 23 particularly as the weight of the As the encasement element 23 is lowered, sufficient concrete should be poured within the encasement element 23 and about the steel beam 2G- so that the head of unsolidied concrete is greater than the head of water or mud on the outside of the encasement element 23. In order to be certain that this situation exists, the pouring of concrete may -be startedwhen the lower end 21 ofthe encasement element23 is lowered to the water line and concrete may be poured at such a rate as will insure that the concrete within the encasement element 23 and about the steel beam 20 is at a level at least as high as the water line during and throughout the lowering operation of the encasement element 23. v

Though the nose portion of the concrete encasement element may be in the form of a truncated ccne as shown in Figs. l and 2, it may take other forms as shown in Figs. 7-14 inclusive, for example. In Figs. l and 8, the concrete encasement 23 comprises a nose portion |24 -generally in the shape of a truncated pyramid. In Figs. 9 and 10 the concrete encasement 223 has a nose portion 22@ generally chisel shape. In Figs. ll and 12 the concrete encasement 323 includes a nose portion 324 generally in the shape of a hemisphere. In Figs. 13 and 14 the concrete encasement 23 has a bottom 424 which is substantially at.

Piles encased in accordance with the invention described above are suitable for use in the construction of foundations for buildings, the construction of bridges, wharves and other installations particularly when they are adjacent to water and particularly when the construction work is to Ibe located above Water or mud. Piles located in such areas should have their surfaces protected down to below the mud line in order to prevent such erosion as might take place due to alternating contact with mud or water and air which might result, if the pile were not protected, in the weakening of the pile to the point where failure could possibly occur.

By the utilization of the instant invention, the need for steel shells to serve as molds for the forming of concrete encasements has been eliminated and by following the method described, the sealing of the encasement to the pile, which passes entirely through the encasement, may be insured and mud and water will not enter between the encasement and the pile member. As the pile which may be a steel beam ipasses entirely through the encasement, the proper transmission oi stresses in accordance with the desired function of the pile will be obtained as the connection between the encasement and the beam or pile need only be a seal. Further, no special equipment is needed to seal the bottom of the encasement to the beam or -pile asis necessary when an ordinary steel shell open at the bottom is used for the formation of the encasement about the beam and 4 as also is necessary when a precast concrete cylinder completely open at the bottom is used as a form in connection with the casting of the completed encasement.

It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention and therefore the invention is not limited to what is shown in the drawingsand described in the specication but only as indicated inthe appended claims.

'We claim:

1. A prefabricated concrete element for use in Aconnection with the encasing of a pile for proconcrete C is greater than that of water or mud.

tection against the erosion action of the elements, comprising a body section and a lower nose section, said body section comprising a hollow generally tubular structure adapted to be substantially evenly spaced about the surface of the pile, said lower nose portion comprising a solid mass having an opening passing vertically therethrough of a section corresponding tov the section of the pile adapted to |be encased but being larger than the section of the pile vonly by the tolerance nec# essary to permit the encasement element tov be passed over the pile in a telescopic manner, said nose portion and said bodyV portion being integral, the height of said nose portion being great enough to act as a bearing orguide in order that the body portion will assume a symmetrical position with respect to the axis of the pile when it is in place about the pile.

2. The structure recited in claim l, the shape of the body portion of the concrete element beingA in the form of a hollow cylinder.

3. The structure recited in claim l, the eX- ternal shape of the nose portion of the prefabricated element bein-g generally in the shape vof a truncated cone.

4. The structure recited in claim l, the external shape of the nose portion of the prefabrioated element being generally in the shape of a truncated pyramid.

5. The structure recited in claim l, the external shape of the nose portion ofthe prefabricated element being generally in the shape of a wedge.

6. The structure recited in claim 1, the eX,- ternal shape of the nose portion of the prefabricated element being generally tapered inwardly from the top thereof to the bottom thereof.

7. The method of forming a protective encasement for a pile having a uniform cross section and positioned at least in part in a fluid medium comprising sliding downwardly in telescoping relation with the pile a prefabricated' concrete en velope into a position where the lower portion of the envelope is at the fluid medium line, said envelope having a bottom portion tting about said pile with sufficient/tolerance to facilitate relative movement between the pile and the envelope and having a body portion spaced from the pile, thereafter continuing the downward movement of the envelope while pouring concrete into the interior thereof at a rate at least suf. ficient to balance the pres-sure of the fluidy medium on the pile to thereby prevent entrance of the fluid medium intov the interior of the envelope until the lower portion ofV the envelope is below the mud line and the upper portion of the envelope is above the water line of the iluid medium, lling the spa-ce between the envelope and the pile with a concrete plastic mass and permitting the-concrete plastic mass to set in situ.

: Y VICTOR FRENKIL.

(References on following page) Number REFERENCES CITED 1,558,127 The following references are of record in the 2,168,459 file of this patent: 2,200,524

UNITED STATES PATENTS 5 Number Name Date Number 953,088 Hndes Mar. 29, 1910 41,234 954,973 Koetitz Apr. 12, 1910 Name Date Upson Oct. 20, 1925 Upson Aug. 8, 1939 Watt May 14, 1940 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date The Netherlands 1937

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US953088 *Feb 13, 1909Mar 29, 1910Stetson G HindesSupporting-column for wharves, piers, &c.
US954973 *Jun 29, 1909Apr 12, 1910Frederick A KoetitzFitting for pile-casings.
US1558127 *May 31, 1923Oct 20, 1925Upson Maxwell MSetting composite piles
US2168459 *May 21, 1937Aug 8, 1939Raymond Concrete Pile CoComposite pile with h-beam
US2200524 *Jul 14, 1937May 14, 1940Raymond Concrete Pile CoH-beam composite pile
NL41234C * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2488073 *Sep 15, 1947Nov 15, 1949Western Foundation CorpForming cast-in-place concrete incasements of previously driven piles
US2933898 *Nov 16, 1955Apr 26, 1960Raymond Int IncOffshore platform structures
US3087308 *Aug 26, 1957Apr 30, 1963Raymond Int IncMethod of installing piles for resisting upward soil movements
US3114245 *Apr 3, 1958Dec 17, 1963Intrusion Prepakt IncEarth pile anchorage
US3851483 *Dec 12, 1972Dec 3, 1974Holley MSleeved-pile structure
US3992272 *May 29, 1975Nov 16, 1976Continental Oil CompanySubmerged offshore platform joint protection
US4019301 *Oct 24, 1975Apr 26, 1977Fox Douglas LCorrosion-resistant encasement for structural members
US4543015 *Sep 14, 1983Sep 24, 1985Kruse William EPile having wedge former
US4808038 *Apr 24, 1987Feb 28, 1989Shell Oil CompanyDisplacing epoxy based curable liquid thermosetting resin through the pile into the adjacent soil
US4834583 *Aug 8, 1988May 30, 1989Shell Oil CompanyStabilizing a hollow pile embedded in earth with a solidifiable liquid thermosetting resin
US4876896 *Jun 16, 1986Oct 31, 1989I.W. Industries, Inc.Method of testing protective encapsulation of structural members
US7857549 *Apr 24, 2009Dec 28, 2010Cable Lock, Inc.Underpinning pile assembly for supporting a structure upon the earth and process for installing such underpinning pile assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification405/216, 405/250, 405/233
International ClassificationE02D5/22, E02D5/60
Cooperative ClassificationE02D5/60
European ClassificationE02D5/60