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Publication numberUS2428288 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 30, 1947
Filing dateApr 12, 1945
Priority dateApr 12, 1945
Publication numberUS 2428288 A, US 2428288A, US-A-2428288, US2428288 A, US2428288A
InventorsWalter C Giles, Frederick F Long, John A Miles
Original AssigneeAmerican Viscose Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Guide-mounting arrangement
US 2428288 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

'Spt.30, 1947. QAMI E AL 2,428,288

GUIDE-MOUNT ING ARRANGEMENT Filed April 12, 1945 INVENTORS.

Patented Sept. 30, 1947 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFKZE John A. Miles and Frederick F. Long, "Chester,

and Walter C. Giles, Swarthmore, 'Pa., assignhrs to American Viscose Corporation, Wilmington, Del, a corporation of Delaware Application April 12, 1945, vSerial No. 587,980

9'Claims. 1

This invention relates to guide-mounting means, and is particularly concerned With the reduction of breakage of guides.

The present invention is useful Wherever thread guides may become subject at times to stresses exceeding that for which they are normally designed. The high stress may be that developed by the thread bundle being controlled by the guide' itself and it may be desirable to avoid breakage or severe damage to the thread bundl while relieving the stress without damaging or breaking the guide itself. Again, the stressesmay be developed by improper operation or negligent servicing of adjacent or associated mechanisms. vAn example-of this occurs in connection with the type of thread-drawing mechanism comprising as a unit a rotating wheel or godet and an associated guide for causing and controllingthe lateral displacement of a thread wrapped one or more times thereabout. Such a mechanism is of use in numerous situations, such as in artificial filament spinning machines, and may take various forms. It may comprise a smooth-faced iroller on an axis inclined to that of the wheel, or it may be of a peripherally grooved roll or a "pronged non-rotary guide in which the grooves or prongs control the displacement of the thread. These guides, whether rotary or non-rotary, are 'fixedin place on stationary bearings if rotary, or on a stationary support if non-rotary, as close as possible to the wheel. The proximity of the guide to the wheel is of importance. If placed too far from the wheel or godet, less traction is obtained between the thread and the wheel, so

that slippage thereon may occur. Again, if the guide is displaced unnecessarily far from the wheel, the thread makes too sharp an angle about the guide and the increased Wear and tear upon the thread gives rise to breakage of the filaments in the thread, particularly when the thread 'being "passed about the wheel and guide mechanism is not completely set up, as is often the case where such mechanisms are frequently used, for example, in an artificial filament spinning machine. It has been found in the past that for any one of various reasons the thread may at times be allowed to wind upon the wheel until a sufiicient mass is built up thereon to force the guide, whether rotary or non-rotary, to be deflected away from the wheel. Such guides, rotary or non-rotary, are generally made of a brittle material, such as porcelain, glass or phenolic resins, which are incapable of bending to any great extent with the result that breakage of the guides occurs as the result of such deflection. In the case ofguides of the rotary type, they are frequently supported upon shafts made of such brittle material and liable to the same excessive breakage during use.

The accumulation of the thread about the wheel may result from accidental breakage of the thread 'inpassing from the wheel to the next threadhandling device, or as the result of an operators carelessness or forgetfulness when dofiing the machine, during which operation he may 'purp'osely allow the thread to gather upon the wheel.

It is the principal object of the invention to provide a guide-mounting capable of 'being distorted 'plastically and, if necessary, of even being broken, so that severe damage or breakage to the guide is avoided, in order to relieve any excessive stress applied to the guide. This has the advantage of breaking a relatively inexpensive and easily replaceable mounting part while avoiding breakage of the guide itself or of the bearing associated with a guide of the rotary type, which parts are generally made of expensive materials in order to meet the specific requirements of smoothness, hardness, and freedom from abrasion and wear caused either by contact with the thread itself in the case of the guide material or --eration of the lap-displacing guide of Figures 2 and 3 in association with a wheel;

Figure 5 is a view illustrating the application of the invention to a more common type of guide; and

Figure -'6 shows the application of the invention to a rotary type of guide.

Figure '1 shows a lap-displacing guide, such as maybe made of porcelain. The effective guiding body *Zhas two grooves '3 and a shank 4. As shown, the long shank i is of triangular crosssection, though, of course, it could be of any desired shape, and it serves for mounting the guide simply by being placed within a complementary socket in which it may be held by a sfet 'screw. When such a guide is broken by virtue of the pressures exerted thereon by the thread guided thereabout or by that carried on the adjacent wheel, it is no longer of use.

In accordance with the present invention as shown in Figures 2 and 3, the guide body 5 having grooves 6 is provided with a short shank I which fits within a socket 1a provided in one end of an adapter or mounting member 8. In the specific example shown, the end 9 of the member 8 provided with the socket la is considerably enlarged with respect to the shank 10 of the adapter, though this is not an essential feature of the construction in accordance with the present invention, but rather the result of the fact that the shank 1 of the guide is approximately of the same size as the complementary socket intended to receive the shank It! of the adapter. An essential feature of the invention, however, is to provide at least one point of weakness in the mounting member at a position therealong beyond the point therein to which the guide shank extends. When the mounting member is of the construction shown, i, e., the shank ll] of the member is smaller than the socket end 9, the shank It may beof sufiicient weakness to assure that any bending or breakage occurs at some point of its length. However, if the difference in cross-sectional shape of the shank I and socket end 9 is insuificient to assure breakage along the shank 10, a transverse cut I I may be made at any desired position alon the shank Ill beyond the portion thereof which is received within the supporting socket for holding the guide mounting. A transverse cut may be made of such a depth as to provide for either bending or breakage under a predetermined moment of force exerted upon the guide. Instead of a single cut, a plurality of cuts may be provided and if desired, a single cut may be extended completely around the shank Ill.

Whether the mounting member is merely bent under the stress or is broken depends upon the material of which it is made. It may for example, be made of a fairly hard, brittle, easily breakable material, such as molded phenolic resin or similar resins, in which case, breakage would occur before any appreciable bending takes place. On the other hand, the mounting member may be made of lead or other ductile material, either metallic or of a synthetic resin plastic. In the latter case, the guide mounting may undergo considerable bendin plastically to relieve the stress before breakage occurs, and such a material consequently has the advantage that it can be bent back to its original position after the proper thread-guiding conditions are restored and such re-bending can be repeated a number of times before the material ruptures. Any of the materials from which the mounting member is to be made, can readily be formed about the shank of the guide by casting or other simple molding operations, and when lead or other metallic materials, as well as some of the thermoplastic resins are used in making the mounting member, the broken parts can be re-melted and molded to re-form the adapter.

The shape of the shank of the mounting member is immaterial, since it can be either cylindrical or non-cylindrical, suchas of triangular or rectangular cross-sectional shapes, the former of which is shown in the drawing.

Figure 4 illustrates the operation of the lapdisplacing guide of Figures 2 and 3. As there shown, a plurality of guides are mounted at spaced intervals upon a rail l2 by means of set screws l3 extending to sockets in the rail for receiving the shanks IU of the guide adapters. Each guide is associated with one of the wheels I4 and i5 shown, that associated with wheel M being shown in normal operation with the thread bundle proceeding first through the back groove 6 and then around the wheel, again through the guide but this time through the front groove 6 and again around a wheel, thereby displacing the laps of thread above the wheel laterally of the periphery thereof. A large accumulation of thread 46 is shown upon the wheel l5, so that it has exerted a pressure under the guide 5 and bent it upwardly. Figure 2 shows the under side of the guide 5 as mounted in Figure 4, so that the weakening out H is beneath the adapter as shown. When an operator arrives at the scene and removes the excess accumulation of threads I6, he may then bend the guide mounting back into proper position, assuming that it is made of lead and that it has not been bent to such an extent as to cause rupture.

In Figure 5, a guide constructed in accordance with this invention is shown in a modified threadhandling arrangement. As shown, a thread proceeds from a source H which may be subject to a drag or brake 18, through a guide IQ of pigtail form and thence to the nip between feeding rollers 20. The guide I9 is secured in a mounting member 2! constructed in accordance with the invention and secured in a supporting rail 22 by means of a set screw 23. The mounting member 2! is so constructed that it will bend when tension in the thread between supply I1 and the rolls 20 exceeds a predetermined amount, so that it will give in that event, thereby avoiding breakage and damage of both the thread and the guide. The strength of the point of weakness in the guide-mounting member is predetermined in accordance with the character of thread being handled. Thus, if the thread happens to be a heavy cord, it will stand considerable tension and consequently the mounting member may be designed to resist a much greater bending moment than would be the case with a lighter yarn and especially when such yarn is of incompletely set artificially produced filaments.

Any form of guide may be mounted in accordance with the invention, such as a pot-eye, pigtail, and the like.

Figure 6 illustrates the invention as applied to supporting a rotary guide comprising a roller 24 having a thread-carrying surface mounted rotatably upon a shaft 25. The shank portion 26 of the shaft 25 projecting axially with respect to'the guide is received in a socket within a mounting member or adapter 8, which is here shown as of the same construction as that in Figures 2 and 3.

It is to be understood that changes and variations may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

We claim:

1. In combination, a guide having a shank projecting therefrom and a mounting member having the guide secured to oneend thereof, said mounting member having a shank extending from the portion to which the guide is secured and adapted to besecured to a supporting structure, the mounting member having at least one transverse plane of weakness therethrough which is more susceptible to yield under the stress of a predetermined bending moment than the guide.

2. In combination, a guide having a shank projecti'ng therefrom and a mounting member having the guide secured to one end thereof, said mounting member having a socketed portion to which the guide is secured and a shank extending from the socketed portion and adapted to be secured to a supporting structure, the shank portion of the mounting member having at least one point thereof which is weaker than the socketed portion of the mounting member and weaker than the guide.

3. In combination, a guide having a shank projecting therefrom and a mounting member having the guide secured to one end thereof, said mounting member having a socketed portion to which the guide is secured and a shank extending from the socketed portion and adapted to be secured to a supporting structure, the shank portion of the mounting member having at least one point thereof which is weaker than the socketed portion of the mounting member and weaker than the guide, said mounting member being made of a deformable material.

4. In combination, a guide having a shank projecting therefrom and a mounting member made of lead having the guide secured to one end thereof, said mounting member having a socketed portion to which the guide is secured and a shank extending from the socketed portion and adapted to be secured to a supporting structure, the shank portion of the mounting member having at least one point thereof which is weaker than the socketed portion of the mounting memher and weaker than the guide.

5. In combination, a guide having a shank extending therefrom and a mounting member having a socket in one end adapted to receive the guide shank, said mounting member having a shank portion extending from the socketed portion and the transverse cross-section through the shank of the mounting member being sufficiently reduced at a portion thereof adjacent the socketed portion of the member to render the reduced section more susceptible to yield under the stress of a predetermined bending moment than the guide.

6. In combination, a guide having a shank extending therefrom and a mounting member made of deformable material having a socket in one end adapted to receive the guide shank, said mounting member having a shank portion extending from the socketed portion and the transverse cross-section through the shank of the mounting member being sufficiently reduced at a portion thereof adjacent the socketed portion of the member to render the reduced section more susceptible to yield under the stress of a predetermined bending moment than the guide.

7. In combination, a guide having a shank extending therefrom and a mounting member made of a ductile material having a socket in one end adapted to receive the guide shank, said mounting member having a shank portion extending from the socketed portion and the transverse cross-section through the shank of the mounting member being sufficiently reduced at a portion thereof adjacent the socketed portion of the member to render the reduced section more susceptible toyield under the stress of a predetermined bending moment than the guide.

8. In combination, a guide having a shank extending therefrom and a mounting member made of lead having a socket in one end adapted to receive the guide shank, said mounting member having a shank portion extending from the socketed portion and the transverse cross-section through the shank of the mounting member being sufficiently reduced at a portion thereof adjacent the socketed portion of the member to render the reduced section more susceptible to yield under the stress of a predetermined bending moment-than the guide.

9. In combination, a guide having a shank projecting therefrom and a mounting member having the guide secured to one end thereof, said mounting member having a socketed portion to which the guide is secured and a shank extending from the socketed portion. and adapted to be secured to a supporting structure, the shank portion of the mounting member having at least one point thereof near the juncture of its shank with its socketed portion which is weaker than the socketed portion of the mounting member and weaker than the guide.

JOHN A. MILES. FREDERICK F. LONG. WALTER C. GILES.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,922,146 Tynan Aug. 15, 1933 600,341 Whittum Mar. 8, 1898 1,385,066 Ayres July 19, 1921 1,964,356 Howe June 26, 1934 2,388,068 McDermott Oct. 30, 1945 2,266,557 Kline Dec. 16, 1941 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 641,591 France Oct. 7, 1928 5,887 Great Britain L 1890

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US600341 *Jul 1, 1895Mar 8, 1898 Thread-guide support for spinning-machines
US1385066 *Jan 4, 1921Jul 19, 1921Ayres DavidThread-guide
US1922146 *Mar 4, 1931Aug 15, 1933Henry J TynanThread feeding mechanism
US1964356 *Apr 13, 1932Jun 26, 1934Clarence R HoweGuide eyelet for textile apparatus
US2266557 *Jul 15, 1939Dec 16, 1941Ind Rayon CorpApparatus for handling thread or the like
US2388068 *May 4, 1944Oct 30, 1945American Viscose CorpGodet
FR641591A * Title not available
GB189005887A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2682335 *Dec 28, 1949Jun 29, 1954Remington Rand IncStrip handling machine
US2896879 *Jun 12, 1953Jul 28, 1959American Viscose CorpYarn guide
US8054649 *Oct 1, 2009Nov 8, 2011Etherwan Systems, Inc.Adjustable housing frame with industrial rails for adjusting the depth of communication apparatus within a housing cabinet
US20110080079 *Oct 1, 2009Apr 7, 2011Peng Te-ChunAdjustable housing frame with industrial rails
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/157.00R, 242/364.2, 248/200
International ClassificationD01D5/00
Cooperative ClassificationD01D5/00
European ClassificationD01D5/00