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Publication numberUS2429281 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 21, 1947
Filing dateJun 13, 1945
Priority dateJun 13, 1945
Publication numberUS 2429281 A, US 2429281A, US-A-2429281, US2429281 A, US2429281A
InventorsElmore Solins
Original AssigneeElmore Solins
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rug kit and method of making rugs therefrom
US 2429281 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 21. 1947. j E, sows I 2,429,281

RUG KIT AND METHOD OF MAKING RUGS 'I'HEREFROM Filed June 13, 1945 INVENTOR. Y [fl/W025 502 //V5 Patented Oct. 21, 1947 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE RUG 'KIT AND METHOD OF MAKING HUGS THEREFROM Elmore. Solins, New. York, .N. Y. Application June 13, 1945, Serial-No. 599,177

7 Claims.

My invention relates to rug making. More particularly my invention is directed toward a novel'rug kit and method of making a rug therefrom.

One of the objects of my invention is to pro vide a novel rug making kit which shall he characterized by its simplicity and usefulness and which at the same time shall be complete as to all the necessary items for rug making.

Another object of my invention is toprovide'a novel method for making rugs which shall be particularly adapted [for home use, the steps be ing such as to to produce. afirst rate rug.

Other. objects of my invention will become apparent as the description of the invention proceeds or they will hereinafter be pointedout.

In the accompanying drawing,

Fig. 1 is a plan view showing certain rug makmaking the rug;

Fig. 2 is 'a plan view of a portion of the fringe shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged cross-sectionalview taken substantially along the line 3-3 of Fig. 1;

Figs. 4 and 5 are views similar to Fig. 3, but illustrating-further steps in: my improved process for making rugs; and

Figs. 6 and 7 are plan views of reduced-size of modified forms of backing members whichmay be used in making the rugs.

Referring now in detail to the drawings; and

The backing member ID may be of any suitable relatively rugged material, such as, for example, canvas, and substantially of rectangular shape, as

a series of relatively closely spaced parallel lines l5 running longitudinally of the material. lines l5 serve as guide lines for attaching the fringe l2 to the backing member ID, as will soon be described.

The fringe l2 may be of any desired color comprising adjacently disposed transverse loops maintained by a pair of central] diSposed longitudinal rows of chain stitches l1 and I8, and rows of chain stitching l9 and 20 adjacent opposite longitudinal edges of said fringe. The

2 material of the fringe I2 is preferably of the type employed to produce the well known shaggy mats for bathroom use.

In accordance ing stepsare employed in making the rug from a row of fringe I2 is stitched to the next adjacent line l5, one half of has been the stenciled lines.

When the entire stenciled backing member is covered? by fringe, the threads of the lines stitching l9 ble manner.

I0 of and 20 are pulled out in any suita- This will cause the opposite longi' tudinal edges of the fringe to open, as shown in Fig. 5, where the threads 20' of one half of one section of fringe are left in position to show the contrast. The rug is then shaken vigorously to cause the yarn to fluff, resulting in a shag rug, quickly and easily made.

I have found that good results are obtained when the fringe I2 is first attached to the backing member I!) by starting substantially at the center until about five or six rows are completed,

and completing the full coverage of the backing member by the fringe.

I have found that good results are obtained when I; employ rayon thread for the stitching lines-I'l l8; IQ-and 2D.

While the above describes the making of a rug of substantially rectangular shape, it is unlines 3| follow the peripheral contour of the backing member. Similarly a round backing member 40, as shown in Fig. 7, with stenciled guide lines 4| are provided when it is desired to make a round rug.

It will thus be seen that I have provided a novel rug making kit and novel method of making a rug therefrom in which the objects of my invention are achieved and which is well adapted to meet the conditions of practical use.

As various possible embodiments might be made of the above invention, and as various changes might be made in the embodiments above set forth, it is understood that all matter herein set forth or shown in the accompanying drawing is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Having described my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a method of making a rug from a backing member having stenciled guide lines thereon and a preformed longitudinal fringe member consisting of a continuous yarn arranged in a series of flat transverse adjacently disposed loops of yarn, the said loops being temporarily maintained in adjacent fiat position by removable rows of stitching adjacent opposite longitudinal edges of said fringe-that improvement which comprises the steps of permanently attaching said fringe to said backing member by a row of stitching passing through said fringe substantially along the longitudinal axis thereof and through said backing member substantially along said stenciled guide lines, folding said attached fringe substantially in half with the pont of attachment to the backing member as a fold line and then pullin out said removable stitching from said fringe.

2. In a method of makin a rug from a backing member having stenciled guide lines thereon and a preformed longitudinal fringe member consisting of a continuous yarn arranged in a series of fiat transverse adjacently disposed loops of yarn, the said loops being temporarily maintained in adjacent flat position by removable rows of stitching adjacent opposite longitudinal edges of said fringe-that improvement which comprises the steps of permanently attaching said fringe to said backing member by a row of stitching passing through said fringe substantially along the longitudinal axis thereof and through said backing member substantially along said stenciled guide lines, folding said attached fr nge Substa tially in half with the point of attachment to the backing member as a fold line and then pulling out said removable stitching from said fringe, and then shaking said assembled fringe and backing member vigorously to cause said yarn to fluff.

3. A home making rug kit of the character described comprising a backing member of canvas material or the like provided with a plurality of relatively closely spaced parallel guide lines and a fringe member made of a continuous thread of yarn, said fringe member being made into a series of flat transverse adjacently disposed loops substantially in the same plane, said adjacently disposed loops being maintained in said position by removable rows of-stitching adjacent opposite longitudinal edges of said fringe and a pair of rows of stitching parallel to and relatively closely disposed on opposite sides of the longitudinal aXis of said fringe, the said fringe being adapted to be permanently attached to said backing member by a line of stitching passing through said fringe between said center parallel rows of stitching and through said backing member along said guide lines.

4. A home making rug kit according to claim 3 in which the said backing member is substantially rectangular in shape and in which the said guide lines are arranged parallel to the longitudinal edges of said backing member.

5. A home making rug kit according to claim 3 in which the said backing member is non-rectangular in shape and in which the said guide lines follow the peripheral contour of said backing member.

6. A method of making a shag rug comprising cutting a canvas or the like material into a shape of predetermined peripheral contour, imprinting on said backing member a plurality of guide lines, said guide lines being relatively closely spaced, parallel and generally following the peripheral contour of said backing member, making a fringe member of continuous yarn or the like material by arranging said yarn into a series of transverse, adjacently disposed loops, maintaining said loops in position by rows of removable stitching disposed adjacent opposite longitudinal edges of said fringe and rows of stitching parallel to and on opposite sides of the longitudinal axis of said fringe, permanently attaching said fringe to said backing member by a row of stitching passing through said fringe member between said center parallel rows of stitching and passing through said backing member substantially along said guide lines, folding said attached fringe substantially in half with the point of attachment to said backing member as a'fold line, pulling out said removable stitching and then shaking said assembled fringe and backing member vigorously to cause said yarn to fluff.

7. A method according to claim 6 in which the said fringe is permanently attached to said backing member in the following sequence: start from the innermost guide line and work outwardly until a number of rows have been completed, then start from the outermost guide line and work inwardly for a few rows, then continue outwardly from the previously left ofi inner point and work outwardly until the entire backing member is covered by fringe.

'ELMORE SOLINS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US328283 *May 20, 1885Oct 13, 1885 Manufacture of rugs
US1956594 *Oct 19, 1931May 1, 1934Emma RindskopfRug and the method of making same
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2485396 *Jan 23, 1947Oct 18, 1949Masland C H & SonsFringe machine
US3071777 *Feb 5, 1962Jan 8, 1963Luther L SheltonRug and method of making the same
US3405673 *May 3, 1966Oct 15, 1968Yasuaki IwaiTufted cord for rugs
US4201811 *Jun 27, 1977May 6, 1980Rug CraftersRug and method of making the same
US4233918 *Oct 25, 1978Nov 18, 1980Rug CraftersMethod of making a rug
US6269759 *Mar 2, 1999Aug 7, 2001E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyApparatus for producing a stitched pile surface structure
US6726976Nov 30, 2000Apr 27, 2004E.I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyTufted pile structure having binder concentrated beneath the backstitches
US6951590Dec 9, 2002Oct 4, 2005Invisia North America S.A.R.L.Stitched pile surface structure and process and system for producing the same
US6967052Oct 15, 2002Nov 22, 2005Invista North America S.A.R.L.Stitched-bonded yarn surface structure
US20020062905 *Nov 30, 2000May 30, 2002Zafiroglu Dimitri P.Process for bonding of stitched carpets
US20030082334 *Dec 9, 2002May 1, 2003Zafiroglu Dimitri PeterStitched pile surface structure and process and system for producing the same
US20040065400 *Oct 6, 2003Apr 8, 2004Zafiroglu Dimitri PeterStitched yarn surface structure and method of forming the same
US20040071926 *Oct 15, 2002Apr 15, 2004Dimitri ZafirogluStitched-bonded yarn surface structure
US20050155693 *Nov 12, 2003Jul 21, 2005Zafiroglu Dimitri P.Process for bonding of stitched carpets
Classifications
U.S. Classification112/9, 112/412, 112/410
International ClassificationD04G3/02, D04G3/00, A47L13/20
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/20, D04G3/02
European ClassificationD04G3/02, A47L13/20