Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2429881 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 28, 1947
Filing dateNov 16, 1942
Priority dateNov 16, 1942
Publication numberUS 2429881 A, US 2429881A, US-A-2429881, US2429881 A, US2429881A
InventorsHoover Howard Earl
Original AssigneeHoover Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cabinet arrangement for absorption type household air-conditioning units
US 2429881 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 28, 1947. H. E. HOOVER 2,429,881

CABINET ARRANGEMENT FOR AN ABSORPTION TYPE HOUSEHOLD AIR CONDITIONING UNIT Filed Nov. 16, 1942 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR fiolaaldl'arlflaom'r BY I Oct. 28, 1947. H. E. HOOVER 2,429,881 CABINET ARRANGEMENT FOR AN ABSORPTION TYPE HOUSEHOLD AIR CONDITIONING UNIT Filed Nov. 16, 1942 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR lfawardiarl/Yaovzr 5252x444 ATTORNEY CABINET ARRANGEMENT FOR AN ABSORPTION TYPE HOUSEHOLD AIR CONDITIONING UNIT Filed Nov. 16, 1942 4 sheets heet 5 ochzs, 1947. H E HOOVER 2,429,881

INVENTOR Haw ard Earl Hoover Oct. 28, 1947.

H E. HOOVER Filed Nov. 16; 1942 -4 Sheets-Sheet 4 o; a w v n N I E "s A A N Q Q I INV NTOR jYoward Earl b ooVe-r w a Q Q A ATTORNEY Paiented Oct. 28, 1947 PATENT OFF ICE CABINET ARRANGEMENT FOR ABSORPTION TYPE HOUSEHOLD AIR-CONDITIONING UNITS- corporation of Ohio Application November 16, 1942, Serial No. 465,684 18 Claims. (01. 62-140) This invention relates tothe art of air conditioning and more particularly to a portable or household type alrconditioning unit utilizing a heat operated refrigerating apparatus for cool- 7 ing and dehumidifying the air to be conditioned.

v as to provide for direct air cooling of all the heat rejecting elements of the unit, disposal into the outside air of condensate formed by the dehumidiflcation of the air to be conditioned and disposal of products of combustion for the heating unit into the outside air.

Other objects of the invention will become apparent as the description proceeds when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a sectional elevational view of the conditioning unit embodying one form of the invention.

Figure 2 is a view taken alongthe line 2--2 of Figure 1 looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 3 is a sectional view taken along the line 33 of Figure 1 and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 4 is a view similar to Figure 1 but with certain air-circulating elements and air directing ducts eliminated for clarity to disclose the location of certain parts of the apparatus.

Figure 5 is a transverse sectional elevational view of a modified form of the invention.

Figure 6 is a transverse sectional view of a third form of the invention.

Figure 7 is another transverse sectional view similar to Figure 6 but showing certain parts in greater detail.

Referring now to the drawing'and first to Figures 1 to 4 thereof, there is illustrated an air conditioning apparatus which is enclosedwithin a casing structure III which is provided with a base portion II for supporting the casing on the floor. Casing I includes a projecting chamber l2 extending from the upper rear face of the cabinet l0 and adapted to extend into a window opening of a space to be conditioned for the purpose of admitting outside air and for rejecting heat from the apparatus to the outside.

The casing I0 is interiorly divided into a lower heating chamber l3 and an upper cooling and dehumidifying chamber 14 and an upper heating rejecting chamber [5. The chambers l4 and I are laterally separated by an insulated partition l6 extending vertically within the casing and terminating adjacent the lower end of chamber. l5. The lower wall of chamber I5 is defined by an insulated panel I! which, as illustrated in Figure 3, as an upwardly and rearwardly slanted end portion l8. The right hand end of chamber N, as viewed in Figures 1 and 2, extends upwardly and rearwardly of chamber 14 and is open to the projecting chamber l2. The rear wall of chamher I: is provided with louvres IQ for the admission of fresh air to be utilized in a manner to be 1 described hereinafter. The forward face of chamber I4 is provided with louvres 20 to admit air to be conditioned. The chamber I4 is insulated as indicated at 2| and the rear face thereof opens into an insulated air duct 22 which terminates in an insulated inlet chamber 23 for an air circulating fan 24 which is mounted in a fan housing 25. The fan housing 25 communicates with a discharge duct 26 which communicates with an open grille 21 in the sloping top wall of the casing l0 adjacent the front thereof. The wall 22 is provided with a slot 28 within which is positioned a damper 30 so as to allow outside air brought through the louvres I9 to pass into the duct 22.

The chamber I5 is provided interiorly thereof with a generally U-shaped panel 32 provided with flanges which extend to the panel l8 and to the front and top walls of casing I0. Panel 32 thus forms a U-shaped air duct 33 and an inner air chamber 34. The rear face-of the projecting portion l2 of the casing is provided with louvres 36. The panel 32 divides the louvres into an upper air outlet portion and a lower air inlet portion which communicates with the air chamber 34.

A fan housing 38 is mounted in the chamber 34 and is provided with a suction eye 39 communicating with the space 34. A rotary air circulating fan 40 is mounted within the casing 38. The casing 38 is provided with a discharge duct 4| which communicates with the lower leg of the U-shaped air duct 33 adjacent the rear portion of casing I0.

An electrical motor 43 is supported from the wall It by suitable brackets 44 between the fans 24 and 40 to which it is suitably connected so that the motor may simultaneously operate both air circulating fans.

Associated with the casing I0 is a cooling and dehumidification apparatus of the absorption type which comprises a boiler B, an'analyzer D, a tubular air cooled condenser C, a tubular aircooled absorber A, a tubular air-cooled rectifier R, a tubular finned evaporator E, a solution res- The cooling and dehumidification apparatus will be charged with a suitable refrigerant, such as ammonia, a suitable absorber therefor, such as water. and a pressure equalizing medium, preferably a dense inert gas like nitrogen.

A gas burner H is arranged to heat the boiler B. The gas burner H will be supplied with fuel from a suitable source through the conduit Ii which will be controlled in any desired manner, not shown.

It is preferred to control the apparatus by thermostatic control mechanism responsive to the temperature of air exiting through the grille 21 which will simultaneously govern the energizetion of the motor M and the supply of fuel to the burner Such a control mechanism is disclosed in Patent No. 2, 228,343, dated January 14, 1941.

Th application of heat to the boiler B liberates refrigerant vapor from the strong solution of refrigerant and absorbent therein contained. The vapor so liberated passes upwardly through the analyzer D from which it is conveyed by the conduit 52 and rectifier R to the upper portion of the condenser C. The vapor is liquefied in the condenser and the resulting condensate is conveyed from the lower portion of the condenser C by a conduit 53 which communicates with a gas inlet conduit communicating with the upper portion of the evaporator E.

The evolution of refrigerant vapor from the solution contained in the boiler produces weak solution which is conveyed from the boiler to the solution reservoir S by way of the conduit 55, liquid heat exchanger L, and conduit 56. The solution in the reservoir is then conveyed to the upper portion of the absorber A by the gas lift pump conduit 51. Pumping gas is introduced into the rising leg of conduit-51 by a conduit 58 which connects to the conduits 54 which is connected to the discharge orifice of the circulating fan F.

The solution flows continuously downwardly through the absorber by gravity in contact with and in counterfiow relationship with a mixture of the inert gas and refrigerant vapor flowing upwardly through the absorber in a manner to be described hereinafter. The solution absorbs refrigerant vapor and the resultin heat of absorption is rejected to cooling air. The rich solution formed in the absorber is conducted from the lower portion thereof to the upper portion of the analyzer D by way of the conduit 59, liquid heat exchanger L and conduit 60, thus completing the solution circuit.

The inert gas discharged by the circulating fan F through the conduit 54 flows downwardly through the evaporator E in contact with liquid refrigerant supplied through the conduit 53.- The refrigerant evaporates and diffuses into the inert gas producing a refrigerating effect. The rich gas formed by the evaporation of the refrigerant is conveyed from the lower portion of the evaporator E to the lower portion of the absorber A by the conduit 62. The gas then flows upwardly through the absorber in contact with the solution in the manner heretofore described. As the gas traverses the absorber refrigerant vapor is removed therefrom and the resulting lean gas is removed from the upper portion of the ab orber 4 and conveyed to the suction side of the fan by the conduit 33, thus completing the inert gas circuit.

the gas lift pump 51 to operate across the maximum pressure diiferential available in the apparatus.

It will be noted that the lower portion of the evaporator is slightly above the lower portion of the absorberwherefore any liquid material not vaporized in the evaporator may flow by gravity through conduit 62 into the lower portion of the absorber.

The evaporator is arranged in a substantially vertical position in the chamber l4 and is provided with suitable heat absorbing fins 65. A drip collecting tray 63 is mounted in the lower portion of the chamber [4 in position to receive condensate which is formed on the evaporator. This condensate is drained from the tray 66 through a pipe 61 into a Jacket 68 which surrounds the lower end of the products of combustion discharge flue 69. The line 69 communicates with the combustion tube of the boiler 3. extends upwardly along the left hand wall of casing III as viewed in Figure 4 and terminates in the upper extends to a point adjacent the air 'inlet of the" fan 40.

A solid panel H forms the bottomwall of the chamber l3 and prevents room air from finding its way into the apparatus except through the conditioned air inlet louvres 20.

The tubular finned absorber A is positioned in the lower leg of the U-shaped air path 33 and extends downwardly and forwardly of the apparatus as viewed in Figure 3. The rectifier R is positioned in the vertically extending bightportion of the U-shaped air path and the condenser C is positioned in the upper inclined portion of the air path 33.

The boiler-analyzer, the solution heat exchanger, the solution reservoir, the condensate vaporizing cup and their associated conduits and connections are all positioned in the lower heating chamber l3 which is separated from the upper chambers of the apparatus by insulated panels.

In the operation of the apparatus outside air is drawn in through the lower louvres 36 into the chamber 34 and is then forced by the fan 40 through the U-shaped air passageway 33. In its passage through this passageway the outside air picks up the heat of absorption, the heat of rectification and the heat of condensation from the absorber A, rectifier R. and condenser 0, respectively. The heated air then returns to the outside through theupper louvres 36, thus dissipating the heat absorbed from the air being conditioned and the heat which the cooling and dehumidifying apparatus must reject to the outside.

The fan 24 draws air to be conditioned through the louvres 20 across the evaporator E and discharges the resulting cooled and de-humidified air through the grille 21 into the room undergoing conditioning. The condensate formed on the evaporator E drips into the tray 66 and then flows through conduit 61 to the evaporation cup 63 wherein the condensate is heated by the waste 5 products of combustion which are flowing through the conduit 8l.- There is a continual air circulation into the cup and in contact with the condensate therein and then through the'conduit III to the suction inleto'f-the fan 48. The condensate is highly heated by the hot products of combustion in flue 88 and the-resulting vapor and some air are conveyed through the conduit l8 into the air stream which will ultimately be dischargedto the exterior through the upper louvres 38." In this way condensate is vaporized and disposed of into the outside air and is not permitted. to collect in a stagnant pool or to find its way back into the air in the space undergoing conditioning.

There is a continual flow of air through the louvres is into the chamber IS; a part of this air will pass through the slot 28 when the valve 30 is set to allow some outside air to be bled into the conditioned air stream. The air entering through louvres l9 supplies combustion air to the burner H and further it provides some air flow across the evaporating condensate in the chamber 88 and through the conduit 18 and in that way contributes slightly to the air stream flowing over the heat rejecting portions of the apparatus. In this connection it is worthy to note that the air flowing through the various chambers and passageways in the chamber I3 is brought into contact with the fan motor 48, thereby cooling that motor, and that it also flows across and in contact with the motor M for the cooling and dehumidifying system to dissipate the heat generated by that motor.

The arrangement of the products of combustion discharge flue is important. Referring to Figures 1 and 4, it will be noted that the products of combustion discharge flue is entirely within and adjacent the insulated walls of the casing l so that it will be unable to heat those walls to an extent suflicient to interfere with the operation of the apparatus. The conduit 89 is so arranged that it is not brought into contact with the air stream flowing through the passageway containing the heat rejecting portions of the apparatus and it discharges the hot products of combustion into the cooling air stream after that air stream has traversed all heat rejecting elements of the system. This promotes the efllciency of the apparatus and prevents added loads being placed upon the cooling air circulating fan by unnecessary heating of thecooling air. It is 7 further of importance that the products of combustion are discharged into a relatively great body of moving air so that the same are immediately swept through the louvres 38 into the outside air and are also immediately dispersed due to the velocity of the air stream. This effectively prevents products of combustion from finding their way into the space being conditioned.

The insulation on the walls of the casing and air duct maintains substantial thermal isolation between the chamber H! which houses the heated parts of the apparatus, the chamber l which houses the heat rejecting parts of the apparatus, and the chamber M which houses the absorbing parts of the apparatus.

The arrangement of the cooling air stream with respect to the absorber and condenser provides particularly eifcctive utilization of certain inherent characteristics of the particular conditioning and dehumidifying apparatus disclosed herein. It is characteristic of such apparatuses that the capacity of the system and to some extent its efficiency are dependent directly upon the temperature which can be maintained in the abserver. In general the lower the temperature of the absorber the more eillcient will be the operation of the system and the greater will be its capacity, other things being equal. In the disclosed arrangement the cooling air first traverses the absorber and then traverses the condenser. The air which traverses the condenser'has of cour'se'been previously heated by the absorber but this does not materially affect the operation of the system as the condenser will operate effectively at temperatures above those which must be maintained in the absorber.

Referring now to'Figure 5 there is illustrated a modified form of the invention.

In this form of the invention there is provided acasing structure 18 which is supported upon'a base plate or foot element 18. The casing structure is provided with a rearwardly projecting portion II which is designed to extend through the 1 opening in a window of a room to be conditioned; The upper front portionor the casing is provided with louvres 18 for circulation of room air. The'lower group of louvres at the front of the casing is segregated interiorly oi the casing by a duct 19 which communicates with the suction eye of an air circulating'fan 88. An air filter plate 8| is mounted directly behind the lower group of fying chamber 82 which is open to the remaining louvres I8.

The projecting portion ll of the casing is pro-, vided in its rear face with air inlet and outlet louvres 83. A panel 84 is provided which extends upwardly within the portion ll of the casing and in line with the rear wall of the lower portion of the casing 15 to segregate the interior of the portion 'II from the other parts of the casing. Inwardly of the segregated portion of the casing 'Il there is provided a plate 85 extending from approximately the mid-point of the end wall of casing 11 upwardly and rearwardly in parallel over the top wall thereof to a point spaced from the panel and then extends downwardly to join the bottom wall of the casing 11. There is also provided a panel 88 joined to the panel 85 adjacent its point of connection to the rear wall of the casing 11 and extending downwardly and rearwardly in parallel relation with the bottom wall of casing l1 until it effects a second junction with the vertically extending portion of panel 85. These two panels define an air flue of generally U-shape through the casing 11 as illustrated. A centrifugal air circulating fan 81 is mounted in the lower portion of the bight of the U-shaped air path in position to receive air passing between panel 88 and the lower wall of the casing ll through an opening 88 provided for that purpose in the vertically extending portion of panel 85. The walls of the casing and air ducts will preferably be covered with insulation (not shown) in the manner disclosed in connection with Figures 1 to 4.

An electrical motor 89 is mounted upon a suitable bracket 98 and is arranged to drive the fans 81 and 88 directly.

The air cooling and dehumidification apparatus like that disclosed in connection with Figures 1 to 4 is of the absorption inert gas type though the one preferred to use in the structure of Figure 5 diifers in several respects from that disclosed time trolled similarly, to theapparatus f-Fl8ures .1 to4. I I

The apparatus in Figure -comprises a generator II! from which rises a vapor lift, pipe II to discharge into a gas separation-chamber. The application ofheat to the boilerproduces vapor which operates the vapor lift pump to lift weakened solution into the separation chamber 02. The weak solution is then conveyed from the chamber 02 to the upper portion of an absorber A. by conduit .4, liquid heat exchangerL and conduit 05. o g

The absorber A is of a known type which is provided interiorly with a plurality. of baflle plates to bring an inert gas and absorption liquid into intimate contact. The liquid flows downwardly through the absorber vesselby gravity in contact with refrigerant vapor and inert gas supplied in a manner to be described hereinafter, and the resulting enriched solution is conveyed from the bottom portion of the absorber A to the generator II1 by means of conduit 90, liquid heat exchanger L' and conduit 91, thus completing the solution circuit.

The heat of absorption produced in the absorber is rejected to a secondary cooling fluid circulating through a cooling coil 98 wrapped around the exterior surface of the absorber vessel. The upper end of the coil 90 is connected by means of a conduit 99 to the upper portion of a heat rejecting element I 00 positioned in the lower leg of the U-shaped conduit in the casing 11. This heat repecting element is of the tubular finned direct air cooled type. The cooled condensate formed in the heat rejecting element I00 is returned to the lower portion of the coil 98 'by the conduit II.

The upper portion of the absorber vessel houses a gas circulating fan I02 which is driven by suitable electrical motor I03. The fan discharges inert gas from which refrigerant vapor has been removed through the conduit I04 to the gas heat exchanger G from which it then flows into a downwardly extending U-shaped conduit I05. The leg of the conduit I05 not connected to the gas heat exchanger connects to a horizontal conduit section I06 which terminates in a vertically extending conduit section I01. The conduit I01 then connects to the upper portion of a finned tubular air-cooling evaporator E. After traversing the evaporator E the inert gas and entrained refrigerant vapor is then returned to the lower portion of the absorber A by conduit I08, the gas heat exchanger G and conduit I09, thus completing the inert gas circuit.

The refrigerant vapor liberated in the chamber 92 is conveyed to the upper portion of a condenser C by means of a conduit 93. The condenser C is positioned in the upper leg of the U-shaped air channel formed in the projecting portion 11 of the casing and is of the tubular direct air cooled type.

The condensate formed in the condenser C is removed therefrom through the conduit I I0 into the right hand leg, as viewed in Figure 5, of a U-shaped conduit III which is connected between the bight portion of the gas conduit I05 and the rich gas side of the gas heat exchanger G.

In the operation of the conditioning and dehumidifying apparatus the circulating fan I02 causes the inert gas to fiow through the conduit I05, I06 and I01 with sumcient velocity and pressure to sweep the refrigerant liquid through the conduits I05, I06 and I01 into the upper portion of the evaporator which is located at an elevation materially above the elevation of the point from whichthe condenserisdraineda 'I'l isactionand constructionailows the apparatus to bemade very compact and to make thecondenserand evaporator substantially independent 1 oi each other with respectto relative vertical position.

The refrigerant flowing through the evaporator in contact with the inertgas evaporates thereinto to produce a refrigerating effect which serves to cool and dehumidify the room air which is flowing across and in contact with the evaporator coil and the fins mounted on the exterior thereof. The resulting enriched inert gas refrigerant vapor mixture and non-volatile material whichflows to the bottom of the evaporator E are conveyed therefrom to the lower end of the absorber A by means of the conduit I00, gas heat exchanger G' andconduit I00. a

The generator III is provided with a centrally extending products of combustion heating flue I I2 which communicates with a products of combustion discharge flue II3 terminating adiacent the gas outlet louvres 03.

The upper wall of the panel 19 which defines in part the chamber 82 and the wall I20 which defines the rear boundary of the cooling chamber 82 are provided with a condensate sumpI I4 which surrounds the outlet of the air circulating fan 80. The sump H4 and the lower wall of the casing of the fan are drained by means of conduits H5 and H6 into a'vaporizing cup H8 which surrounds the products of combustion flue. H3.

A vapor removal conduit IIO extends into the cup H8 through the lower portion of the wall and terminates adjacent the inlet of the circulating fan 81. c

In the operation of this form of the invention the air to be conditioned is drawn in through the louvres 18 and air filter 8| and is then forced upwardly over the evaporator coil E and is returned to the room through the upper louvres 10. In its passage across the evaporator coils the air is cooled and dehumidifled. Condensate formed by the dehumidification of the air flows into the vaporizing cup where the same is relatively highly heated and the resulting vapor is drawn oil through the conduit II 9 by the suction of the fan 81 together with some air from the interior of the casing 15. In this way moisture is removed from the air within the room and is ultimateiy disposed of as a vapor into the outside air.

In this form of the invention the lower wall of the chamber 15 is open to the room and air for supporting the combustion of a heater for the generator II 1 as well as air which is drawn through conduit I I9 is supplied from the room being conditioned. This constant removal of air from the room being conditioned and the disposal of the same into the outside air causes outside air to leak into the room and thus maintains a constant supply of fresh air.

It is to benoted in connection with this form of the invention that the absorber occupies a relatively small volume within the cabinet 15 and that the indirect cooling heat rejecting element I00 is positioned in the projecting section 11 of the easing and is arranged to have outside air drawn directly thereover which air then traverses the condenser. This method of air flow maintains a low temperature in the absorber and assures efficient operation thereof. With a forced draft mechanism such as the fan 81 for drawing cooling air across the absorber cooling coils I00 the temperature in the absorber can be maintained close to the temperature of the outside air.

Referring now to Figures 6 and '7 there is dis- Louvres I49 are formed in the wall I55for a purpose to be described hereinafter. The walls I58 and I55 terminate in contact with a panel I56 which forms one wall of a casing housing an air circulating fan I51. A suitable opening is provided at I58 to form an air inlet opening between the fan and the cooling chamber. The rear wall of the fan chamber is defined by a panel I59 which extends to the top wall of the casing I58 and in cooperation with the panel I56 form a discharge duct for the fan I51. by the panels I56 and I59 terminates in a perforated section I60 of the casing I50 adjacent the top forward portion thereof.

The projecting portion iii of the casing is segregated interiorly from the other portion thereof by a panel I6I which forms the rear and bottom walls of a casing receiving an air circulating fan I62. The rear face of the casing is provided with louvres I63 for inlet and egress of cooling air. The interior of the projecting portion II is segregated into upper and lower sections by a panel I64 which extends from the midpoint of the rear louvred portion of the casing rearwardly and upwardly to a point above the upper periphery of the fan where it joins a vertically extending panel I 65 which forms the front wall of the fan casing. The panel I65 is provided with an opening I66 to admit air to the fan. The lower wall of the casing I5I is provided with louvres I68 which admit air into the casing I5I beneath and rearwardly of an inclined panel I69 which serves to segregate the area through which air may be admitted by the louvres I68 from the air path opening into the suction eye of the fan I62. The panel I65 is provided with an opening indicated at I18 to admit air into the main body of the casing at one side of the fan housing. The walls of the casing and air ducts will preferably be covered with insulation (not shown) in the manner disclosed in connection with Figures 1 to 4.

The fans I51 and I62 are driven by an electrical motor I1I which is mounted upon a suitable bracket I12. The air conditioning and dehumidifying system disclosed in connection with this form of the invention will be charged, heated and controlled similarly to the apparatus disclosed in connection with Figures 1 to 4.

The air circulating and dehumidifying apparatus comprises a generator I88 and an analyzer I8I. A vapor conduit I82 extends from the analyzer to the upper portion of a tubular air cooled condenser C" which is positioned in the upper air passageway in the chamber I5I. Condensate formed in the condenser C" is removed therefrom by a conduit I83 which is connected to the right hand leg, as viewed in Figure 6, of a U-shaped conduit I84, The upper portion of therighthand leg of conduit I84 is connected to the gas discharge conduit I85 which extends between the upper portion of the evaporator E" and a gas heat exchanger G". The left hand leg of the I conduit I84 opens into the lower portion of the tubular evaporator E".

The lean solution formed in the generator I88 is conveyed therefrom to a solution reservoir 5" by means of conduit I88, a liquid heat exchanger L" and a conduit I81. The solution is conveyed from the solution reservoir S" to the absorber by way of the-gas lift pump conduit I88 which discharges into a gas conduit I89 connecting the up- The duct formed per portion of the absorber A" to the circulating fan F". The absorber is of the tubular finned air cooled type and the solution flow downwardly therethrough by gravity in contact with and in counterflow relation to a mixture of inert gas and refrigerant vapor flowing upwardly through the absorberin a manner to be described hereinafter. The rich solution formed in the absorber is then returned to the analyzer by way ofconduit I90, liquid heat exchanger L" and conduit I9I, thus completing the absorbing solution circuit. The solution. reservoir S" is vented by conduit I92 to the gas conduit I89.

The fan F" is driven by an electrical motor M". The fan places inert gas under pressure and discharges the same to the lower portion of the evaporator through conduit I19, gas heat exchanger G", and the conduit I93 which extends from the gas heat exchanger to the lower portion of the evaporator E". The velocity of the inert gas through the evaporator is such that the same is sufficient to sweep or drag liquid refrigerant upwardly therethrough against the influence of gravity as the liquid is evaporating into the inert gas to produce a refrigerating effect. The conduit I93 is provided with an overflow drain I94 which is arranged to convey excess liquid refrigerant into the rich solution return conduit I 98.

The inert gas refrigerant vapor mixture formed in the evaporator is conveyed therefrom to the lower portion of the absorber A" by way of conduit I85, gas heat exchanger G", and conduit I95. The inert gas refrigerant vapor mixture flows upwardly through the absorber A" in contact with and in counteriiow relationship with absorbing solution which absorbs refrigerant vapor from the mixture. The resulting heat of absorption is subjected to cooling air passing over the exterior walls of the absorber. After traversing the absorber the resulting lean gas is then returned to the circulating fan F" by conduit I89.

In the operation of this form of the invention through the louvres I52 over the evaporator E" where the same is cooled and dehumidifled and is then discharged by the fan I51 through the grillework I60 into the space to be conditioned. Cooling air is drawn in through the lower group of louvres I63, flows across the absorber A through the circulating fan I62 and then is discharged across the condenser C" through the upper group of louvres I63 back to the atmosphere.

Waste products of combustion from the heater for the generator I are discharged through the products of combustion flue I96 to the outside atmosphere as is indicated in Figure 6. I

Condensate produced by the dehumidificatio of the room air collects on the panel I55 and is drained by a conduit I91 to an evaporating cup I98 which is mounted on the flue I96. A conduit I99 extends from a point just within cup I98 to the suction portion of the fan I62. This construction provides for vaporization of the condensate and ultimate disposal of the same into 11 the outside air through the medium of the cooling air stream.

Air for combustion of the fuel utilized to heat the generatorIBII and condensate vapor conveying air for conduit I99 is supplied through the louvre I68 and the passageway I10 in panel I65. Outside air to be mixed with the room air also flows through the louvres I68 and louvres I49 into the cooling and dehumidiiying chamber where it mixes with the room air undergoing conditioning.

The apparatus illustrated in Figures 6 and '7 is designed to rest upon the sill 200 of a window structure MI. The lower face oi the extending portion II of the apparatus rests directly upon the sill and the lower window sash, as indicated at 202, is lowered into contact with the upper surface of the projecting chamber I 5|.

The apparatus may be secured in position upon the window sill by brackets 203 or it may be supported from th floor by a suitable light weight pedestal.

While only three embodiments of the invention have been shown and described herein, it is apparent that various changes may be made in the arrangement and construction of parts without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the annexed claims.

I claim: 7

1. Air conditioning structure comprising a casing, means in said casing forming a cooling air duct, means in said casing forming a conditioned air duct, means for circulating cooling air and air to be conditioned through said cooling air and conditioned air ducts, respectively, an air conditioning and dehumidiiying apparatus of the heat operated absorption type associated with said casing comprising a cooling and dehumidifying element positioned in said conditioned air duct, elements for dissipating the heat of absorption and the heat of condensation in said cooling air duct, a heat operated element in said casing, a combustible fuel burner arranged to apply heat to said heated element, means for bringing condensate produced by the dehumidification of the conditioned air into heat exchange relation with waste products of combustion from said burner, and means for disposing of vapor of condensate into the cooling air, flowing through said cooling air duct.

2. Air conditioning apparatus comprising a casing having a portion adapted to extend into a window opening of a space to be conditioned, means within said portion of said casing forming a duct for outside air having air inlet and outlet parts, means in said casing forming a duct for conditioned air, and a mechanism chamber, fans for circulating air through each of said ducts, a motor for operating said fans, a heat operated cooling system of the absorption type associated with said casing including an evaporating element in said conditioned air duct, a condenser and an absorber in said outside air duct, a generator and a combustible fuel burner for heating said generator in said mechanism chamber, means connecting said evaporating element and said absorber for circulation of inert gas therebetween, means connecting said absorber and said generator for circulation of absorption solution therebetween, means for conveying refrigerant vapor from said generator to said condenser, and means for conveying refrigerant liquid from said condenser to said evaporating element, means for disposing of products of combustion produced by said burner into outside air, means sealing said mechanism chamber against er and air to be admitted to said conditioned air duct.

3. In an air conditioning apparatus, a casing having a portion adapted to extend through a window opening in a space to be conditioned into the outside air, means forming a cooling air duct having air inlet and outlet openings in said portion of said casing, means forminga conditioned air duct having air inlet and outlet ducts in the non-projecting portion of said casing, air circulators arranged to circulate air through each of said ducts from the inlet to the outlet thereof, an air cooling apparatus of the heat operated absorption type utilizing an inert pressure equalizing medium associated with said casing and including an evaporator in said conditioned air duct, a heated part in said casing outside said ducts, a condenser in said cooling air duct, an absorber structure having a heat rejecting part in said cooling air duct, and said condenser and said heat rejecting part being positioned in that part of said extending portion of said casin which is normally outside the boundaries of the space being air conditioned.

4. In an air conditioning apparatus, a casing, means forming a conditioned air duct in said casing having air inlet and outlet portions, means forming a cooling air dust in said casing having air inlet and outlet portions, air circulating means in each of said ducts arranged to circulate air through each of said ducts from the inlet to the outlet thereof, an absorption type cooling apparatus associated with said casing and comprising an evaporator positioned in said conditioned air duct, a condenser in said cooling air duct, an absorber in said casing exteriorly of said air ducts, a cooling element for said absorber having a portion in heat exchange relation with said absorber and a portion in said cooling air duct, a generator in said casing, means providing for circulation of inert gas between said absorber and said evaporator, means providing for circulation of absorption solution between said absorber and said generator, means for conducting refrigerant vapor from said generator to said condenser, means for conducting refrigerant liquid from said condenser to said evaporator, and means for heating said generator.

5. In an air conditioning apparatus, a casing,

means forming a conditioned air duct in said casing having air inlet and outlet portions, means forming a cooling air duct in said casing having air inlet and outlet portions, air circulating means in each of said ducts arranged to circulate air through each of said ducts from the inlet to the outlet thereof, an absorption type ,cooling apparatus associated with said casing comprising an evaporator positioned in said conditioned air duct, a condenser in said cooling air duct, an absorber in said casing exteriorly of said air ducts, a cooling element for said absorber having a portion in heat exchange relation with said absorber and a portion in said cooling air duct, 2. generator in said casing, means providing for circulation of inert gas between said absorber and said evaporator, means providing for circulation of absorption solution between said absorber and said generator; means for conducting refrigerant vapor from said generator to said condenser, means for conducting refrigerant liquid from said condensforming'a passageway for cooling air in said casing, means for circulating air through said passageways, a heat operated cooling apparatus associated with said casing including an air cooling and dehumidifying part in said conditioned air passageway, a heat rejecting part in said cooling air passageway, a heated part in said casing, means for heating said heated part, means for vaporizing moisture removed from air being conditioned including a part which is heated by said heating means, and means for disposing of said vaporized moisture into air circulating through said cooling air passageway.

'7. In an air conditioning apparatus of the domestic type, a casing, means forming a passageway for conditioned air in said casing, means forming a passageway for outside air in said casing, means for circulating air through said passageways, a heat operated cooling apparatus associated with said casing including an air cooling and dehumidifying part in said conditioned air duct, a heat rejecting part in said outside air duct, a heated part in said casing, means for heating said heated part, means for vaporizing moisture removed from air being conditioned including a part which is'heated by said heating means, and means for dissipating vapor of said moisture including means for conveying said vapor into the suction zone of said circulating means for outside air.

8. In an air conditioning apparatus, a casing structure having a portion adapted to extend through an opening in the wall of a space to be conditioned, an absorption refrigerating apparatus associated with said casing, said/refrigerating apparatus comprising an evaporator in said casing, an air cooled condenser and an air cooled absorber in the extending portion of said casing, means within said casing forming a path of flow of conditioned'air over said evaporator, means within said casing forming a path of flow of atmospheric air over said condenser and said absorber, means connecting said evaporator and said absorber for circulation of inert gas, a generator, means connecting said absorber and said generator for circulation of absorption solution, a power operated gas circulator arranged to circulate said inert gas, a gas lift pump arranged to circulate absorption solution, means for supplying pumping gas to said gas lift pump, said evaporator and said absorber being positionued at substantially the same elevation in said casing, means for circulating air through said air flow paths and common means for operating said air circulating means.

9. In an air conditioning apparatus, a casing, a conditioned air duct in said casing, a cooling air duct insaid casing, air circulating means in each of said ducts, a heat operated absorption type cooling apparatus associated with said casing including an evaporator in said conditioned air duct, a condenser in said cooling air duct, an

absorber structure including heat dissipating- Rtevation below the upper portion of said evaporator, means providing for circulation of inert gas between said evaporator and said absorber including power operated circulating means for placing the inert gas under pressure, means providing for circulation of absorption solution between said absorber and said generator, means for conducting refrigerant vapor from said generator to said condenser, means for conducting refrigerant liquid from the lower part of said condenser to said evaporator including means utilizing inert gas under pressure for elevating said refrigerant liquid, and means for heating said generator.

10. In an air conditioning apparatus, a casing having a portion adapted to extend through a window opening in a space to be conditioned into the outside air, means forming a cooling air duct having air inlet and outlet openings in said portion of said casing, means forming a conditioned air duct having air inlet and outlet ducts in the non-projecting portion of said casing, air circulators arranged to circulate air through each of said ducts from the inlet to the outlet thereof, an air cooling apparatus of the heat operated absorption type utilizing an inert pressure equalizing medium associated with said casing and including an evaporator in said conditioned air duct, a heated part in said casing outside said ducts, an absorber structure having -a heat rejecting part in said cooling air duct, and a condenser in said cooling air duct positioned to be cooled by air which has traversed said heat rejecting part.

11. In an air conditioning apparatus, a casing,

.means forming a conditioned air duct in the upper part of said casing having air inlet portion and outlet portion above said air inlet portion, means forming a cooling air duct in said casing having air inlet and outlet portions, air circulating means in each of said ducts arranged to circulate air through each of said ducts from the inlet to the outlet thereof, an absorption type cooling apparatus associated with said casing and comprising an evaporator positioned in said conditioned air duct, a condenser in said air outlet portion of said cooling air duct, an absorber in said casing exteriorly of and below said air ducts, a cooling element for said absorber having a portion in heat exchange relation with said absorber and a portion in said air inlet portion of said cooling air duct, a generator in said casing below said air ducts, means providing for circulation of inert gas between said absorber and said evaporator, means providing for circulation of absorption solution between said absorber and said generator, means for conducting refrigerant vapor from said generator to said condenser, means for conducting refrigerant liquid from said condenser to said evaporator, and means for heating said generator.

12. In an air conditioning apparatus, a casing having a portion adapted to extend through a window opening in a space to be conditioned into the outside air, means forming a cooling air duct having air inlet and outlet openings in said portion, of said casing, means forming a conditioned air duct positioned laterally of said cooling air duct having air inlet and outlet ducts in the non-projecting portion of said casing, air circulators arranged to circulate air through each of said ducts from the inlet to the outlet thereoi', an air cooling apparatus or the heat operated absorption type utilizing an inert pressure equalizing medium associated with said casing and including an evaporator in said conditioned air duct, a heated part in said casing outside said ducts, a condenser in said cooling air duct, an absorber structure having a heat rejecting part in said cooling air duct, and said condenser and said heat rejecting part being positioned in that part of said extending portion of said casing which is normally outside the boundaries of the space being air conditioned.

13. In an air conditioning apparatus, a casing. means forming a conditioned air duct in said casing having air inlet and outlet portions, means forming a cooling air duct in said casing having air inlet and outlet portions, air circulating means in each of said ducts arranged to circulate air through each of said ducts from the inlet to the outlet thereof, an absorption type cooling apparatus associated with said casing and comprising an evaporator positioned in said conditioned air duct, a condenser in said cooling air duct, an absorber having heat rejecting elements secured thereto in said cooling air duct, a mechanism chamber in said casing below said evaporator and said absorber, a generator in said mechanism chamber, means providing for circulation of inert gas between said absorber and said evaporator, means providing for circulation of absorption solution between said absorber and said generator, means for conducting refrigerant vapor from said generator to said condenser, means for conducting refrigerant liquid from said condenser to said evaporator, and means for heating said generator. 7 14. In an air conditioning apparatus, a casing, means forming a conditioned air duct in said casing having air inlet and outlet portions, means forming a cooling air duct in said casing having air inlet and outlet portions, said cooling air and conditioned air ducts being positioned laterally of each other in said casing, air circulating means in each of said ducts arranged to circulate air through each of said ducts from the inlet to the outlet thereof, an absorption type cooling apparatus associated with said casing and comprising an evaporator positioned in said conditioned air duct, a condenser in said cooling air duct, an absorberhaving heat rejecting elements secured thereto in said cooling air duct, a mechanism chamber in said casing underlying said cooling air and conditioned air ducts, a generator in said chamber, means providing for circulation of inert gas between said absorber and said evaporator, means providing for circulation of absorption solution between said absorber and said generator, means for conducting refrigerant vapor from said generator to said condenser, means for conducting refrigerant liquid from said condenser to said evaporator, and means for heating said generator, r

15. In an air conditioning apparatus, a casing, means forming a generally U-shaped conditioned air duct in said casing having air inlet and outlet portions, means forming a cooling air duct in said casing having air inlet and outlet portions, means positioned between the legs of said U-shaped cooling air duct for circulating air therethrough, means for circulating air through said conditioned air duct, an absorption type cooling apparatus associated with said casing and comprising an evaporator positioned in said conditioned air duct, a condenser in said cooling air duct, an absorber in said casing exteriorly of said air ducts, a cooling element for said absorber having a portion in heat exchange relation with said absorber and a portion in said cooling air duct, a generator in said casing, means providing for circulation of inert gas between said absorber and said evaporator, means providing for circulation of absorption solution between said absorber and said generator, means for conducting refrigerant vapor from said generator to said condenser, means for conducting refrigerant liquid from said condenser to said evaporator, and means for heating said generator.

16. In an air conditioning apparatus, a casing, means forming a generally U-shaped conditioned air duct in said casing having air inlet and outlet portions, means forming a cooling air duct in said casing having air inlet and outlet portions, means positioned between the legs of said U- shaped cooling air duct arranged to draw cooling air inwardly through one leg of said duct and to expel cooling air outwardly through the other leg of said duct, means for circulating air through said conditioned air duct, an absorption type cooling apparatus associated with said casing and comprisin an evaporator positioned in said conditioned air duct, a condenser in said other leg of said cooling air duct, an absorber in said one leg of said cooling air duct, a generator in said casing, means providing for circulation of inert gas between said absorber and said evaporator, means providing for circulation of absorption solution between said absorber and said generator, means for conducting refrigerant vapor from said generator to said condenser, means for conducting refrigerant liquid from said condenser to said evaporator, and means for heating said generator.

17. In an air conditioning apparatus, a casing structure, means forming a conditioned air duct having air inlet and outlet portions in said casing, means forming a generally U-shaped cooling air duct positioned laterally of said conditioned air duct, air circulating means for circulating air through each of said air ducts positioned adjacent the bight portion of said U-shaped cooling air duct, motor means for driving said air circulating means positioned between adjacent portions and exteriorly of said air ducts, an absorption type cooling apparatus associated with said casing and comprising an evaporator positioned in said conditioned air duct, an absorber structure including heat rejecting parts in one leg of said cooling air duct, a condenser in the other leg of said cooling air duct, 2. generator in said casing and outside said air ducts, means providing for circulation of inert gas between said absorber and said evaporator, means providing for circulation of absorption solution between said absorber and said generator, means for conducting refrigerant vapor from said generator to said condenser, means for conducting refrigerant liquid from said condenser to said evaporator, and means for heating said generator.

18. In an air conditioning apparatus, a casing,

means forming a conditioned air duct in said casing having air inlet and outlet portions, means forming a cooling air duct in said casing positioned laterally of said conditioned air duct, havin air inlet and outlet portions, air circulating means in each of said ducts, motor means for driving said air circulating means positioned between laterally adjacent portions of said air ducts, an absorption type cooling apparatus associated with said casing and comprising an evaporator in said conditioned air duct, an absorber having heat rejecting parts in said cooling air duct, a condenser having heat rejecting parts in said cooling air duct, a generator in said casing outside said air ducts, means providing for circu- 17 absorption solution between said absorber and said generator, means for conducting refrigerant vapor from said generator to said condenser, means for conducting refrigerant liquid from said condenser to said evaporator, and means for heating said generator.

HOWARD EARL HOOVER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the fiie of this Patent:

Number

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1996870 *Apr 20, 1933Apr 9, 1935Grohmann Friedrich AlfredApparatus for cooling and propelling air
US2112221 *Jun 3, 1933Mar 22, 1938Campbell Metal Window CorpVentilating and air treating unit
US2125542 *Nov 28, 1934Aug 2, 1938Catterlin Everett SPortable refrigerating device, particularly for air conditioning
US2130327 *Dec 24, 1932Sep 13, 1938Baldwin Southwark CorpAir conditioning apparatus
US2187892 *Oct 6, 1937Jan 23, 1940Teleregister CorpTransmitting means
US2240178 *Apr 4, 1940Apr 29, 1941Hoover CoAbsorption refrigeration
US2241166 *Aug 17, 1939May 6, 1941Hoover CoRefrigeration
US2255413 *Aug 30, 1937Sep 9, 1941Hoover CoRefrigeration
US2283928 *Apr 23, 1936May 26, 1942Westinghouse Electric & Mfg CoAir conditioning apparatus
US2289035 *Jan 25, 1933Jul 7, 1942by mesne assignmentsAir conditioning apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7900372 *Sep 12, 2008Mar 8, 2011Mabe Canada Inc.Clothes dryer with louvre cover
US20100118492 *Feb 14, 2007May 13, 2010Vestas Wind Systems A/SSystem for Recirculation of Air in a Component of a Wind Turbine
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/429, 62/490, 62/427, 62/285
International ClassificationF25B15/10
Cooperative ClassificationY02B30/62, F25B15/10
European ClassificationF25B15/10