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Publication numberUS2430209 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 4, 1947
Filing dateMar 9, 1945
Priority dateMar 9, 1945
Publication numberUS 2430209 A, US 2430209A, US-A-2430209, US2430209 A, US2430209A
InventorsMarc Boegner Etienne
Original AssigneeMarc Boegner Etienne
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ticket strip
US 2430209 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. M. BOEGNER TICKET STRIP Filed March 9, 1945 ooodom FIG.2

FIG. 3.

5 T a 3 m F 4 8m 08 con Q3 5;. 6 U 0 0 20 MW uzo mzo 9w wzo EEJ E9 EQ TFEQ T \r INVENTOR. ETIENNE M. BOEGNER 4 7'TORA/EYS Patented Nov. 4, 1947 unireo sre TICKET STRIP Etienne Marc Boegner, New York, N. Y.

Application March 9, 1945, Serial No. 581,852

6 Claims.

1 This invention relates to improvements in tickets, and it relates particularly to an improved form of ticket strip suitable for use at theaters,

concerts, sporting events, and the like.

The type of ticket strip now commonly in use consists of an elongated strip of paper, cardboard, or the like that is wound up into a coil or roll so that the tickets may be torn or severed therefrom one or more at a time. When the tickets are issued to' the public by means of ticket issuing machines, a centrally located hole is provided on the strip between every two individual tickets. Usually, the individual tickets cannot be provided with score line permitting ready separation of ticket stubs for accounting purposes, because the strip would be weakened and the stresses exerted by the machine at the time of the issuing would cause breaks to occur in the strip at the perforated zone.

Each of the ticket usually is provided with printed matter such as the price of the ticket and the number of the ticket in the roll, this latter number or related series of numbers being used in order to check the number of tickets sold or for accounting purposes.

Usually, when a plurality of tickets are sold to a purchaser, these tickets are handed to the usher or attendant and the attendant folds them and tears off one end of the ticket, the purchaser retaining part of each of the tickets and theattendant retaining the stub to be used, as indicated above, as a means for determining the actual number of tickets sold and collected and for other accounting purposes.

Inasmuch as the tearing of the ticket i dependent entirely upon the manner that it is handled by the attendant, it often happens that the serial number or other data on the stub are damaged or obliterated, thereby introducing errors into the accounting operations. Moreover, when two, three or four tickets are sold in a strip, and these tickets are torn, some difficulty An object of the present invention is to provide an improved form of ticket strip which is sufficiently strong to withstand the action of a ticket issuing device but at the same time permits a group of folded tickets to be readily torn in two.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a ticket strip which is provided with perforations to render it easily torn and which will always provide stubs which include adequate data for accounting purposes.

Another object of the invention is to provide ticket strips having an appearance and arrangement that renders the tickets difficult to counterfeit or duplicate and makes them easily distinguishable from other tickets.

Other objects of the invention will become apparent from the following description of typical forms of ticket strips embodying the present invention.

In accordance with the present invention, I have provided an elongated ticket strip formed of paper, thin cardboard, or the like which may be supplied in roll or other form similar to prior types of ticket strips and which is provided with rows of perforations dividing each individual ticket unit into two segments which may be readily torn apart even when a plurality of the tickets are overlapped.

In order to retain the necessary strength at the perforated zone, the perforations are so arranged across each ticket that the perforations on one ticket are in staggered relationship to the perforations in adjacent tickets. When the adjacent tickets are folded into overlying position, the rows of perforations are parallel, but the individual perforations in the two tickets are in staggered relation with the perforations in one ticket being interposed between the perforations on the adjacent ticket. In this way, strong connecting webs may be left between the segments of each ticket unit, but these webs are opposed by perforations on the next adjacent ticket, when the tickets are folded, so that throughout th entire extent or width of any number of tickets, there is substantially little more tearable material than would be found in half that number of tickets of the ordinary type.

The use of the tickets for accounting purposes is facilitated by applying the serial number and other information necessary for accounting purposes to the adjacent ends of successive tickets so that when the segments on opposite sides of the fold-line between the tickets is torn off, all the indicia or information necessary to identify the tickets is retained on a single stub. Also, because of the provision of the rows of perforations, these stubs are complete and little danger of accidental defacing of the serial number is present.

For a better understanding of the present invention, reference may be had to the accompanying drawing in which:

Figure 1 is a plan view of a section of a typical form of ticket strip embodying the present invention;

Figure 2 is a plan View of a modified form of ticket strip embodying the present invention;

Figure 3 is a plan view of a segment of still another form of ticket strip;

Figure 4 is a plan view of a further modification of a ticket strip embodying the present invention; and

Figure 5 is a plan view of still another form of ticket strip.

The form of ticket strip illustrated in Figure 1 may consist of an elongated strip 10 of fibrous material, such as strong paper, thin cardboard, or the like. The strip l may be of any desired length and for most purposes it may contain several himdred individual ticket units l I, I2, and so forth. If desired, the strip l0 may be provided with a scoring or a creased fold-line 13 between each pair of tickets. Preferably, the tickets used in ticket issuing devices are not scored, for the reason that the strip is weakened, but the material may be creased to render the ticket strip more readily foldable.

.As indicated in Figure l, the ticket H may be divided into two segments Ha and I lb by means of a row of perforations I l which are inclined at an acute angle to the line l3. Similarly, the ticket unit I2 may be divided into two segments [2a and 12b by means of an oppositely inclined row of perforations IS. The rows l4 and I are so arranged that when the ticket units II and I2 are folded at the line I3, these rows will be parallel and in overlying relationship. Inasmuch as it is desired to avoid excessive weakening of the ticket strip 16, the openings Ma and Il a are preferably spaced a substantial distance apart to leave relatively wide webs IE and H between the openings. The openings may be of sufiicient diameter to receive the pins or prongs on the advancing means of a ticket issuing device.

In order to control the separation of the ticket segments from one another, and to facilitate tearing of the tickets, the holes or perforations I la are arranged in staggered relationship to the holes lEa on the ticket unit l2. When two tickets are folded over into overlapping relationship, the apertures Ma will be disposed between the apertures I5a, thereby leaving substantially only one thickness of the ticket strip to be torn in order to separate the segments Nb and 121) from the ticket segments Ma and I2a respectively.

In order to assure the retention by the attendant or ticket taker of a stub which contains information necessary for accounting purposes, indicia of similar nature are applied to the sections Ila and l2a of the ticket units and indicia of similar nature are also applied to the sections llb and I2?) of the ticket units. Thus, for example, and as illustrated, both segments I l a and H17 are provided with the serial number 1002, while both segments IZa and I2!) are provided with the indicia 1003. Otherwise the segments Ill) and I2?) may be identical. However, the ornamentation or data on the segments Nb and [21) may be different from that on the segments Ila and I 2a which likewise may be identical with each other except for the serial number. Thus, regardless of which stub is retained, sufficient information will be available for accounting purposes, and moreover, no matter how many of the tickets are folded one upon the other, the same segments of all of these folded tickets will be retained by the attendant. This is a considerable advantage for accounting purposes.

The form of ticket strip disclosed in Figure 2 is similar in substantially all particulars to that disclosed in Figure 1, with the exception that the strip 20 i provided with parallel rows 2|, 22, and so forth of relatively staggered perforations, thereby permitting the tickets to be torn squarely across instead of at an angle as disclosed in Figure 1.

The form of the invention disclosed in Figure 3 includes a ticket strip 25 which is provided with larger and more widely spaced perforations 26 and 21, thereby making this type of ticket particularly useful with ticket issuing devices having relatively large pins on the issuing drums or segments thereof. The perforations or holes 26 are in staggered relationship to the holes 21, thereby facilitating the tearing of the tickets when a plurality of such tickets is folded.

The form of the invention disclosed in Figure 4 differs from those described above, inasmuch as the individual ticket units 28, 28, 3G, and so forth extend crosswise of the strip and are separated by suitable fold-lines or fine perforations 3!. Moreover, the tearing apertures 32 extend across the tickets and form a continuous line or row of perforations extending lengthwise of the ticket strip 33. However, the perforations 32 in the ticket 28 are in staggered relationship to the perforations 32 in the ticket 29 so that upon folding of the tickets the perforations are not in alignment, but instead perforations on one ticket lie adjacent an imperforate portion between the openings in the other ticket. In this form of the invention, the serial numbers of the tickets may be applied along opposite edges of the ticket strip 33.

While it is preferred that each ticket be provided with a plurality of holes-or perforations to facilitate tearing the tickets in two, it will be understood that only one large opening or slot can be formed in each ticket, these holes 35 and 36 being in staggered relationship in the strip 31 as illustrated in Figure 5.

From the preceding discussion, it will be apparent that ticket strips have been provided that greatly facilitate the keeping of records or accounting for the reason that the stubs of such tickets are not damaged or defaced and the easy separation of the stub from the remainder of the ticket is also assured.

Moreover, the arrangement of the holes or perforations in the tickets can be varied inasmuch as this provides a convenient way of preventing the counterfeiting of ticket strips or the substi-- tution of different rolls of tickets in order to defraud the management of the theaters by indicating that fewer tickets have been sold than is indicated by the serial numbers of the tickets in the rolls furnished by the management.

It will be understood, therefore, that the tickets are susceptible to considerable modification in the number and shape and arrangement of the rows of perforations therein without departing from the invention.

Therefore, the forms of the invention disclosed herein should be considered as illustrative and not as limiting the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. A ticket strip comprising an elongated strip of fibrous material having a plurality of rows of perforations therein dividing said strip into sections, said strip being foldable between said rows to bring said rows into substantial alignment, the perforations in adjacent rows in said strip being staggered with relation to each other so that the perforations in one row are disposed between the perforations in the adjacent row when said ticket strip is folded, the perforations in one row being spaced apart distances substantially equal to the lengths of the perforations in the next adjacent row.

A ticket strip comprising an elongated strip of fibrous material having a plurality of spaced apart rows of perforations and a score line between each pair of rows upon which said strip may be folded to bring said rows into overlapping relationship, said perforations in one row being staggered with relation to the perforations in the next adjacent rows, and the perforations in said one row being spaced apart distances substantially equal to the lengths of said perforations in said next adjacent row.

3. A ticket strip comprising an elongated strip of fibrous material having a plurality of spaced apart parallel rows of perforations and a score line between each pair of rows upon which said strip may be folded to bring said rows into overlying relationship, said perforations in one row being staggered with relation to the perforations in the next adjacent rows, and the perforations in said one row being spaced apart distances substantially equal to the lengths of said perforations in said neXt adjacent row.

4. A ticket strip comprising an elongated strip of fibrous material having a plurality of spaced apart rows of perforations and a score line between each pair of rows upon which said strip may be folded to bring said rows into overlapping relationship, said rows being inclined oppositely and at substantially equal angles to said score line, said perforations in one row being staggered with relation to the perforations in the next adjacent rows, and the perforations in said one row being spaced apart distances substantially equal to the lengths of said perforations in said next adjacent row,

5. A ticket strip comprising an elongated strip of fibrous material that is foldable along spaced apart substantially parallel lines between tickets, at least one perforation in each ticket to weaken the ticket to render it divisible into two parts, and said perforations being in staggered relationship so that they are out of alignment in adjacent tickets when said strip is folded on said parallel lines, said perforations in adjacent tickets being of such length that their combined length is at least equal to a major portion of the width of a ticket.

6. A ticket strip comprising an elongated strip of fibrous material including at least two ticket units, a fold-line between said ticket units, a row of perforations extending across each ticket unit dividing it into two segments, the perforations in said rows being in staggered relation to place the perforations of one row out of alignment with the perforations in'the row in the next adjacent row when said strip is folded in said fold line, said rows otherwise coinciding and the perforations in one row being spaced apart distances substantially equal to the length of said perforations in the next adjacent row, printed matter on the inner segments of said units, and other printed matter on the outer segments of said units, the printed matter on one of the corresponding segments of each ticket unit containing indicia identifying said ticket units for accounting purposes.

ETIENNE MARC BOEGNER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,800,136 Driess Apr. '7, 1931 1,751,547 Hagemann Mar. 25, 1930 2,149,316 Sherman Mar. 7, 1939 2,293,054 Freedman Aug. 18, 1942 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 456,635 Great Britain Nov. 12, 1936

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1751547 *Nov 20, 1923Mar 25, 1930American Sales Book Co LtdAutographic register
US1800136 *May 16, 1930Apr 7, 1931Elver L HinesTransfer slip
US2149316 *Oct 8, 1936Mar 7, 1939Sherman John QSuperposed record strip and method of registering and aligning the same
US2293054 *Nov 13, 1939Aug 18, 1942Benjamin H FreedmanTicket
GB456635A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2798293 *Dec 17, 1953Jul 9, 1957Frank BrodskyAutomatic slicer for bars of butter or the like
US8043475Dec 19, 2007Oct 25, 2011Indiana Ticket CompanyHigh opacity tickets
US20120174934 *Jan 6, 2011Jul 12, 2012Reuben NahouraiiMethod and structure for applying a crutch
DE102010006172A1 *Jan 29, 2010Aug 4, 2011Giesecke & Devrient GmbH, 81677Method for manufacturing public suburban transportation ticket, involves perforating data carrier material tape such that bars of perforation lines do not lie immediately one above other when data tape is folded in fan-shape
Classifications
U.S. Classification283/53
International ClassificationG09F3/02
Cooperative ClassificationG09F3/02, G09F2003/0207
European ClassificationG09F3/02