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Publication numberUS2431157 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 18, 1947
Filing dateJan 11, 1944
Priority dateJan 11, 1944
Publication numberUS 2431157 A, US 2431157A, US-A-2431157, US2431157 A, US2431157A
InventorsZelinka Wenzel
Original AssigneeWestinghouse Electric Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electron device and radiator
US 2431157 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Filed Jan. 11, 1944 59p END 26 SHOW/N6 ursr Fl/V' cur IN TWO I INVENTOR El Z5 INK? BY W ATTORNEY Patented Nov. 18, 1947 2,431,157 ELECTRON DEVICE AND RADIATOR Wenzel Zelinka, Port Nelson, Ontario, Canada, assignor to Westinghouse Electric Corporation, East Pittsburgh, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Application January 11, 1944, Serial No. 517,810

1.6 Claims.

This invention relates to electron devices and, more particularly, to radiators used for cooling electrodes thereof.

The primary object of my invention, generally considered, is to provide an electron device radiator comprising cooling fins so constructed and arranged that they will remain radial at all times.

Another object of my invention is to provide a radiator of the type mentioned in which the cooling fins are locked into position and cannot fall out accidentally.

A further object of my invention is to provide corona ring supporting pins of such shape that the ring may be conveniently spaced accurately with respect to the radiator during assembly.

, A still further object of my invention is to provide a device of the character specified which is considerably simpler to assemble, provides a more eflicient structure of pleasing appearance, and is considerably cheaper to fabricate than previous devices of the type under consideration.

Referring to the scale drawing:

Fig. 1 is an elevational view, with parts in sectlion, of an electron device embodying my inven- Fig. 2 is a plan of the radiator of Fig, 1 detached from the electron device and showing only some of the fins in place.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of the radiator on the line IIIIlI of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of one of the fins prior to incorporation in the radiator,

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the two-part fin which is applied last in manufacturing a radiator embodying my invention.

Fig. 6 is an elevational view of one of the corona ring supporting pins embodying my invention.

Referring to the drawing in detail, like parts being designated by like reference characters, there is shown an electron device ll comprising an enclosing vitreous envelope l 2, a base l3, with lead-in contact members l4 and [5 for the oathode (not shown), a connection l6 for the grid (not shown) and an anode ll formed with a sharpened edge portion [8 sealing to one end of the vitreous envelope II, as illustrated. The anode member, therefore, presents an external surface which, in the present embodiment, is cylindrical and representative of electrode surfaces which may be cooled in accordance with my invention.

A former type of radiator for such an electrode consists of an inner metal ring, preferably of copper, provided with a plurality of longitudinal slots on the outer face thereof, an outer metal ring, preferably of copper, of greater diameter than the inner ring, positioned concentrically with respect thereto and maintained in place by a plurality of cooling fins, each of which has an edge portion seated in one of the outwardly opening slots, each fin consisting of an L-shaped strip of metal such as copper having a normally radial body portion and a flange or foot at its outer end extending at an angle thereto and normally engaging the inner surface of the outer ring,

Considerable difliculty had been experienced in the assembling of radiators of this type since if a certain relative turning movement occurred between the inner and outer rings, the fins would move out of their normal radial positions and be misaligned, with a tendency to fall out of the assembly. This difiiculty has been very troublesome in actual factory production and is eliminated by my invention.

In accordance with my invention I employ inner and outer hollow cylinders or rings l9 and 2! respectively, the inner ring l9 closely fitting the exterior cylindrical portion of the electrode ll so as to lie in heat conductive relationship with respect thereto. Said inner ring is preferably provided with closely spaced outwardly or radially opening slots 22 running parallel to the ring axis and desirably uniformly spaced around the ring periphery, as illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3. Each fin 23, except thelast one to be assembled, has instead of a single flange, a pair of flanges 24 and 25, as shown in Fig. 4,

These flanges are bent in opposite directions and serve not only to accurately space the outer edge portions of each fin from its neighbors, but also to keep said fins positioned radially between the outer and inner rings. This radial position is maintained by virtue of the interfitting of the flanges on the adjacent rings. Furthermore the shape and location of these flanges makes it necessary to assemble the fins one after another in rotation around the radiator, as will be obvious from the drawing. When the radiator assembly is completed it will not be possible to remove any one of the fins, heretofore described, without removing its neighbor, since one flange of each fin overlaps circumferentially and is in abutting relation with a flange on each of the adjacent fins.

This particular construction would make it impossible to position the last fin in the assembly if it were shaped in the manner shown in Fig. 4. I', therefore, overcome this difliculty by cutting such last fin into two sections, as'shown in Fig.

corresponding with the. flange 25" of the other" fins. In addition to these flanges the section 26 carries a lug 28, cut therefrom, and the section 21 carries a lug 29, similarly formed, to

prevent either of the pieces sliding out'of'place with respect to the radiator assembly during the procedure of manufacturing. The foregoing description is, of course, on theassumption'that the fins are inserted parallel to the axis between the inner and outer rings. l9 and 2|. If,

however, the fins are inserted radiallyinto the slots 22 in the inner ring l9, of course priorz'to application of the outer'ring 2 I, they may all be formed as illustratedinliig. 4. as. the fianges24 and 25- donot-interfereh with one another in radial application or removal. Of course during suchassembly some. means for keeping the fins in the slots: 22' such as an elastic bandis needed, assumingthe fins donot tightly fit the slots.

Asshown in Eigrllthesupper corners of each fin-arecut off or beveled asindicated'at 3| and 32-. When the fins arein-position this configuration provides annular grooves. into which brazing material 1 may be placed adjacent the inner and outer rings, l9 and 21-. One corner of each bottomfiange 25' is also desirably cut off or. beveled,as indicated at 33} for convenience. in assembling.

After the parts. haveibe'en assembled, a-ring of brazing material maybe placed in the annular grooves provided" between beveled upper corner poritions 3| and 32 and thewhole assembly placed in a furnace, while protected from oxidation, until the brazing material has melted and run down" to unitetl'ie'engaging edge portions of the fins and rings, thereby not only-holding the partsfirmly together but improving the ability of the radiatorto'dissipate heat.

I have also made an improvement in the pins 34 which support the corona" ring 35'from" the radiator 20. The purpose oftliis ring 35 is to reduce the electric gradientat' the junction. of the glass or vitreous material l2. and themetal of the electrode IT. This; result is accomplished by providing an interior metal sleeve 36 depending from the inside ofthe anode l1; downwardly past the region of :the junction between the thin edge portion I8 and the vitreous envelope 2|. Outside ofthe envelope directly beyond the junction, tlie'corona ring 351s suspended by'pins 34, as shownin" Fig. 1. Formerly these pinswere made of uniform diameter and-the spacing between the radiator andthe coronaringhad to be carefully adjusted.

My new pin'ob'viates thisdifficulty by involving a central portion 38, relatively large in. diameter, which is too big to pass between. the radiator pins or into the. pockets or holes 39 in the corona ring 35. The spacing between the radiator and the. ring is, therefore, deter.- mined by the length of this relatively large section. The relatively small portion 4! fits the corresponding pocket or hole 39" in the. corona ringuntil the-shoulder between it. and the enlarged portion engages the exterior surface of said ring and the relatively small portion 42 fits between fins of the radiator, as. far as it. will go, until the shoulder between it and the relatively large portion 38 engages the lower end portions of said fins.

As an alternative the enlarged portion 38 may be formed as a sleeve fitting a smaller pin portion of uniform diameter or section, said sleeve determining the spacing betweenthe corona ring and the radiator axially of. the device, and the ends of the smaller pin fitting and respectively secured to the radiator and corona ring.

From the foregoing it will be seen that I have provided an improved radiator and coronaring assembly adapted for use with electron devices for cooling electrodes thereof. It will also be understood that all of the fins but one are formed each with two oppositely directed flanges, so that they may be assembled in rotation between two concentrically spaced rings, the assemblybeing completed by the positioning of the parts of the final fin. This fin is cut in two, so that one part carries one fiange and the other part the other flange. One of these part fins is assembled by insertion from thetop of" the radiator and the other by insertion from the bottom. The alternative or radial method of assembly previously described may, of course, be employed. Although I have shown this'associ ated with a particular type of electron device, it

will be understood that I do not wish to be limited thereto, as it is suitable for use on other electron devices, including X-ray tubes.

Although a preferred embodiment of my invention has been disclosed, it will be understood that modifications may be made within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In combination, an electron device comprising an enclosing envelope, a metal electrode secured to and having at least a part projecting outside of said envelope, an inner metal ring'encircling and secured to said outside part for transferring heat therefrom by conduction, a plurality of metal fins projecting radially therefrom, and an outer metal ring encircling said fins, each fin having a uniform radial dimension corresponding with the radial distance between said rings and bifurcations bent in opposite directions from its plane, overlapping circumferentially with those of adjacent fins having their outer surfaces conforming in curvature with that'of the inner surface of the outer ring, and secured to the inner'surface of said outer ring; to maintain the positioning of said fins.

, 2. In combination, an electrondevice comprising an enclosing envelope, a metal electrode secured to and having at least a part projecting outside of said envelope, an inner metal ring encircling and secured to said outside part for transferring heat therefrom by conduction, said ring; having a plurality of outwardly opening radial grooves substantially uniformly spaced around its periphery, a corresponding number of metal fins, each having one edge portion fitting in a groove so that it projects radiallyv outward therefrom, and an outer metal ring encircling said fins, each fin having a uniform radial dimension corresponding with the radial distance between said rings and bifurcations at its .outer end bent in opposite directions from the plane thereof, overlapping circumferentially with those. of adjacent fins, and secured to the inner surface of said outer ring, to maintain the positioning of outside of said envelope, an inner metal ring encircling and secured to said outside part for transferring heat therefrom by conduction, a plurality of metal fins projecting therefrom, and an outer metal ring encircling said fins, each fin having a uniform radial dimension corresponding with the radial distance between said rings and a pair of flanges bent in opposite directions from its plane, overlapping circumferentially with those of adjacent fins, having their outer surfaces conforming in curvature with that of the inner surface of the outer ring, and secured to the inner surface or said outer ring, to maintain the positioning of said fins.

4. In combination, an electron device comprising an enclosing envelope, a metal electrode secured to and having at least a part projecting outside of said envelope, an inner metal rin encircling and secured to said outside part for transferring heat therefrom by conduction, said ring having a plurality of outwardly opening radial grooves substantially uniformly closely spaced around its periphery, a corresponding number of metal fins each having one edge portion fitting in a groove so that it projects radially outwardly therefrom, and an outer ring encircling said fins, each fin having a uniform radial dimension corresponding with the radial distance between said rings and a pair of flanges at its outer end projecting in opposite directions from the plane thereof, overlapping circumferentially with those of adjacent fins, having their outer surfaces conforming in curvature with that of the inner surface of the outer ring, and secured to the inner surface of said outer ring to maintain the positioning of said fins.

5. A radiator adapted to cool an electrode and comprising an inner metal ring, a plurality of metal fins projecting equal distances radially therefrom, and an outer metal ring encircling said fins, each fin having bifurcations bent in opposite directions from its plane, overlapping circumferentially with those of adjacent fins, having their outer surfaces conforming in curvature with that of the inner surface of the outer ring, and secured to the inner surface of said outer ring, to maintain the positioning of said fins,

6. A radiator adapted to cool an electrode and comprising an inner metal ring having a plurality of outwardly opening radial grooves substantially uniformly closely spaced around its periphery, a corresponding number of metal fins each having one edge portion fitting ina groove so that it projects radially outward therefrom, and an outer metal ring encircling said fins, each fin having a uniform radial dimension corresponding with the radial distance between said rings and bifurcations at its outer end bent in opposite directions from the plane thereof, overlapping circumferentially with those of adjacent fins, and secured to the inner surface of said outer ring.

7. A radiator adapted to cool an electrode and comprising an inner metal ring, a plurality of metal fins projecting therefrom, and an outer metal ring encircling said fins, each fin having a uniform radial dimension corresponding with the radial distance between said rings and a pair of flanges projecting in opposite directions from its plane, overlapping circumferentially with those of adjacent fins, having their outer surfaces conforming in curvature with that of the inner surface of the outer ring, and secured to the inner surface of said outer ring, to maintain the positioning of said fins.

8. A radiator adapted to cool an electrode and comprising an inner metal ring having a plurality of outwardly opening radial grooves substantially uniformly spaced around its periphery, a corresponding number of metal fins each having an edge portion fitting in a groove so that it projects radially outward therefrom, and an outer ring encircling said fins, each fin having a uniform radial dimension corresponding with the radial distance between said rings and a pair of flanges at its outer end bent in opposite directions from the plane thereof, overlapping circumferentially with those of adjacent fins, having their outer surfaces conforming in curvature with that of the inner surface of the outer ring, and secured to the inner surface of said outer ring, to maintain the positioning of said fins.

9. A radiator adapted to cool an electrode and comprising an inner metal ring with outwardlyopening radial grooves, a plurality of metal fins fitting all of said grooves but one and projecting therefrom, and an outer metal ring encircling said fins, each of said fins having a uniform radial dimension corresponding with the radial distance between said rings and a pair of flanges bent in opposite directions from its plane, overlapping circumferentially with those of adjacent fins, and secured to the inner surface of said outer ring, said last groove holding one fin having a flange bent in one direction and another generally coplanar therewith and having a flange bent in the other direction, so that the two together when assembled form the equivalent of one of the first-mentioned fins, whereby it is possible to by axial movement between the rings assemble all of the fins, one after the other, except the last two, and then assemble the last by inserting one axially from one end and the other axially from the other end of the assembly.

10. A radiator adapted to cool an electrode and comprising an inner metal ring having a plurality of outwardly opening grooves substantially uniformly spaced around its periphery, metal fins corresponding in number with all of said grooves but one, each having an edge portion fitting in a groove so that it projects radially outward therefrom, and an outer ring encircling said fins, each fin having a uniform radial dimension corresponding with the radial distance between said rings and a pair of flanges at its outer end bent in opposite directions from the plane thereof, overlapping circumferentially with those of adjacent fins, and engaging the inner surface of said outer ring, the remaining groove having a relatively short fin having a, flange extending in a direction corresponding with that of the flanges on the adjacent fin portions and another relatively short fin inserted having a flange extending in the direction opposite from that of its complementary fin portion, thereby making it possible to assemble said fins by axial movement between said rings.

11. The method of making a radiator comprising forming an inner metal ring with a plurality of outwardly opening radial grooves substantially uniformly spaced around its periphery, forming fins each having a pair of flange at one end bent in opposite directions from the planethereof, fitting the unflanged edge portion of each of said fins in said grooves, so that each fin projects radially outward therefrom and oppositely-extending flanges of adjacent fins overlap circumferentially and fitting an outer ring around all of said fins so that said flanges engage the inner surface thereof.

12. The method of making a radiator compris- .ing forming an inner metal ringwitha plurality of outwardly opening grooves substantially uniformly spaced around its periphery, then placing an outer ring around said inner ring sequential-lyinserting in all of said grooves except one, .metal fins axially between said rings, while edge portions are disposed radially in aid grooves, each of said fins ,having a pair of flanges at its outeredge bent in opposite directions from the .plane thereof and engaging the inner surface of said outer ,ring so that the oppositely-extending sfianges of adjacent fins overlap circumferentially, .then sliding a short fin formed with only one flange into one end portion of the remaining groove in said inner ring, and finally sliding another short fin complementary in length with the first-mentioned short fin from the other end of saidradiator into said groove and formed with -,a-fiange extending in the opposite direction from :.-the flange of the other short fin.

:13. In combination, an electron device com- .sDr-ising an enclosing envelope, a metal electrode secured to and having at least a part projecting outside of saidenvelope, a radiator comprising an innerring encircling said-outside part and having fins extending radially therefrom, a pocketed corona ring encircling said envelope, and pins projecting from said radiator into said corona ring for-holding the latter in place, each pin having a central portion, relatively large in diameter, ,and-which is too big to pass between the radiator fins or into the pockets in the corona ring and .end portions which respectively fit between said radiator fins and into said pockets, whereby the spacing .of the ring with respect to said radiator is conveniently determined by the length of said relatively large portion.

14. In combination, an electron device comprising an enclosing envelope, a metal electrode ,secured to and having at least a part projecting ,outside of said envelope, a radiator comprising -an inner ring encircling said outside part and having fins extending radially therefrom, a

pocketed corona ring encircling said envelope,

and pins projecting from said radiator into said .corona ring for holding the latter in place, each pin having a sleeve enclosing its central portion, relatively large in diameter, and which is too big to pass between the radiatorfins or into the pock- -ets in the corona ring and the end portions of .saidenclosed pin respectively fittingbetweensaid radiator fins and into said pockets, whereby the spacing of the ring with respect to said radiator .is conveniently determined by the lengthof said sleeve.

15. The method of making a radiator com- ,prising forming an inner metal ring with a plurality of outwardlyopening radial grooves substantially uniformly spaced around its full periphery, forming fins of uniform width at least nearly all of which have a pair of fiangesat one end .bentin such .a way and extending .in opposite directions from the plane thereof so as .to seat on the inner surface of an outer ring, and as- ,sembling such fins so that they extend radially between said inner metal ring and an outer ring, ,the unflanged portions of said fins fit in said grooves and the flanges on adjacent fins overlap 'circumferentially .and snugly engage the inner surface of the outer ring to maintain the radial positioning of said fins.

16. The method of making a radiator comprising forming a metal cylinder with a plurality of outwardly opening grooves substantially uniformly spaced around its peripheral surface and each extending parallel to the axis, constructing a plurality of metal fins of uniform width, each with a side edge portion bifurcated and the metal portions at each side of the bifurcation bent in opposite directions from the plane of the fin to provide a pair of flanges, constructing a fin of corresponding width but relatively short, with a side edge portion bent to provide only one flange corresponding with a flange of one of the first-mentioned fins, constructing another relatively short fin of corresponding width, complementary in length with respect to the first mentioned short fin, with a side edge portion bent to provide only one flange, corresponding with the other flange of the identified one of the first-mentioned fins, adapted to extend in a direction opposite to the flange of said first-mentioned short fin, placing a hollow metal cylinder, having an inner radius larger than the radius of the firstmentioned cylinder at the bottoms of the grooves by an amount corresponding approximately with the width of said fins, around said first-mentioned cylinder, then sequentially inserting said double-flanged fins, one at a time, axially between said cylinders, while their unfianged edge portions are disposed radially in said grooves, so that the oppositely-extending flanges of adjacent fins overlap circumferentially, then inserting one of said short fins axially between said cylinders, while its unflanged edge portion is disposed radially in the remaining groove, so that its flange fits between the flanges projecting in the corresponding direction from the fins on opposite sides thereof, and finally inserting the other short fin axially between said cylinders, while its unfianged edge portion is disposed radially in the other end portion of said remaining groove, so that its fiange extends in the direction opposite to that of the other short fin and fits between the flanges projecting in the corresponding direction from the fins on opposite sides thereof.

' WENZEL ZELINKA.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,341,752 West Feb. 15, 1944 1,721,878 Grimes July 23,1929 1,976,101 Zeigler Oct. 9, 1934 2,289,984 Mouromtseff et al. July 14, 1942 1,821,080 Sprong Sept, 1, 1931 2,176,657 Finch Oct. 17, 1939 2,191,349 Lengyel Feb. 20, 1940 1,529,190 Kettering Mar. 10, 1925 1,735,213 Purdy Nov. 12, 1929 2,341,752 West Feb. 15, 1944

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2535669 *Oct 21, 1946Dec 26, 1950Hartford Nat Bank & Trust CoElectric discharge tube and means for cooling the anode thereof
US2693026 *Feb 17, 1950Nov 2, 1954Modine Mfg CoMethod of making concentric tubes with radial fins
US2703921 *Apr 14, 1949Mar 15, 1955Brown Fintube CoMethod of making internally finned tubes
US3879100 *Jul 7, 1972Apr 22, 1975Chabot Ferdinand ECircuit breaker terminal connector, and heat dissipator assembly
US4164684 *Dec 30, 1977Aug 14, 1979Hitachi, Ltd.Magnetrons
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Classifications
U.S. Classification313/44, 313/45, 165/185, 29/890.46, 165/74, 313/18, D13/180, 313/46
International ClassificationH01J19/36
Cooperative ClassificationH01J2893/0027, H01J19/36
European ClassificationH01J19/36