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Publication numberUS2431506 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 25, 1947
Filing dateJul 13, 1946
Priority dateJul 13, 1946
Publication numberUS 2431506 A, US 2431506A, US-A-2431506, US2431506 A, US2431506A
InventorsReider Robert W
Original AssigneeReider Robert W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Seamed moccasin type shoe vamp
US 2431506 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 25, 1947. R. w. REIDER SEAMED MOCCASIN TYPE SHOE VAMP Filed July 15, 1946 INVENTOR. %?1! 55/05,?

Patented Nov. 25, 1947 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE I 1 Claim.

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in shoe Vamps.

More specifically, the invention contemplates an improved shoe vamp which is characterized by a central section and a side section extending around the front end and the sides of the central section, and said sections having adjacent edge portions connected in a certain way. It is proposed that these adjacent edge portions have upwardly directed flange portions with their edges in a common horizontal plane. A line of stitches is spaced downwards a short distance from said edges and extends along and secures said flange portions together. It is particularly proposed to provide a thread zig-zagging back and forth across said flange portions and held in said zig-zag formation by the stitches of a pair of spaced parallel line of stitches extending along the bases of the flange portions.

With the above construction the shoe vamp not only will appear attractive as far as design and ornamentation is concerned, but the shoe vamp will be especially sturdyand the tendency for hurting the foot when new will be reduced to a minimum.

Still further the invention contemplates the application of said pair of parallel lines of stitches at the bases of said flange portions,'with a standard two needle sewing machine. A simple method is provided by which a thread is zig-zagged back and forth across said flange portions while the standard two needle sewing machine is operating so that its stitches will hold the thread in said zig-zag formation.

Another object of the invention is the construction of an article as described which is simple and durable and which may be manufactured and sold at a reasonable cost.

For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawing, and to the appended claim in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawing forming a material part of this disclosure:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a shoe provided with a shoe vamp constructed in accordance with this invention.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged developed view of the shoe vamp shown in Fig. 1, illustrated per se.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary enlarged detailed view of a portion of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a bottom view of Fig. 3.

tions I2 and i3.

Fig. 5 is fragmentary sectional view taken on the-line 55 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 6 is a sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 3. 1

The shoe vamp, in accordance with this invention, includes a. central section it) and a side section H extending around the front end and the sides of said central section ID. These sections It and l l have edge portions provided with upwardly directed flange portions [2 and !3, respectively. These flange portions l2 and 13 have their edges in a common horizontal plane, see particularly Fig. 5. The flange portions I2 and I3 are secured together by a line of stitches 14 extending along their lengths a short distance down from their edges. This line of stitches M may be applied with a single needle sewing machine.

A pair of spaced parallel lines of stitches l5 and 15 extend along the bases of the flange por- These lines of stitches l5 and it are formed by a standard two needle sewing machine. In Fig, 4 we see the bobbin thread i! zig-zagging back and forth across the lines of stitches l5 and [5.

A thread I8 is zig-zagged back and forth across the tops of the flange portions l2 and I3 and is held in zig-zag formation by the stitches of said parallel lines of stitches I5 and Hi. This thread l8 may be manually zig-zagged into position during the operation of the sewing machine. However, manual application of this thread will not be practical. It may be mechanically zig-zagged in position by the provision of a pivoted guide lever mounted on the sewing machine and oscillated-by suitable connection with moving parts of the sewing machine. This lever and its operation is not disclosed nor described in detail in this specification'as it forms no part of the new and improved shoe vamp herein claimed. However two needle sewing machines provided with oscillating levers of this type are known, in the sewing machine art.

The advantages of the newly constructed shoe vamp may be understood from the following:

The upwardly directed flange portions l2 and [-3 and the zig-zag thread l8 will give the shoe vamp an attractive appearance. More important, from a mechanical point of view, the shoe vamp will be especially sturdy and will tend not to hurt the foot. Because the flange portions l2 and I3, are directed upwards and extend around the top of the foot, and because of the bobbin I! which extends across the base of the flange portions l2 and I3, there will be little if any tendency of the top portion of the foot being pressed against the curved sides of the upwardly directed flange portions [2 and I3. The line of stitches l4 will securely hold the top portion of the flanges l2 and I3 firmly together. The zig-zag bobbin thread lI will tend to hold the base portions of the flan-ge portions 12 and 13 together. The zig-zag thread l8 will connect the lines of the thread l5 and I6 and the bobbin thread I! into a tight and rigidly connected unit which will securely hold the flange portions 11 and I3 as desired.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiment of my invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the precise construction herein disclosed and the right is reserved to all changes and modiflca tions coming within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claim.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is:

The combination with a shoe vamp having a central section, and a side section extending around the front and sides of said central section, the adjacent edge portions of said sections having upwardly directed and curved flange portions having their edges in a common horizontal plane, and a line of stitches being spaced downwards 4 a short distance of said edges and extending along and securing said flange portions together, of a pair of spaced parallel lines of stitches extending along the bases of said flange portions, and a thread zig-zagging back and forth across said flange portions and held in zig-zag formation by the stitches of said parallel lines of stitches, and said pair of spaced parallel lines of stitches being connected together with a common bobbin thread extending across the bottom of said flange portions for reducing the tendency of the top portion of ones foot from being pressed against the curved sides of said upwardly directed flange portions.

ROBERT W. REIDE-R.

REFERENCES CITED Q The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1102405 *Sep 15, 1910Jul 7, 1914Singer Mfg CoEmbroidering-machine.
US1204046 *Aug 22, 1914Nov 7, 1916John Edward McloughlinSeam.
US1520303 *Feb 16, 1923Dec 23, 1924Nichols Samuel DRibbed article and process of forming same
US1521853 *Feb 8, 1924Jan 6, 1925Int Shoe CoShoe and the method of making shoes
US1841328 *Feb 17, 1931Jan 12, 1932G H Bass & CoFootwear
US2153836 *Feb 6, 1939Apr 11, 1939Harry SchwartzSlip
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2820308 *Jun 10, 1952Jan 21, 1958Handcraft Company IncArticle of footwear
US2934838 *Jan 20, 1960May 3, 1960Joseph F Corcoran Shoe Co IncShoe of convertible appearance
US4901661 *Mar 10, 1989Feb 20, 1990Sturm Lillian PDecorative ribbon
US4981095 *Jan 26, 1990Jan 1, 1991Sturm Lillian PDecorative ribbon
USRE36636 *Dec 31, 1992Apr 4, 2000Sturm; Lillian P.Decorative ribbon
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/45, 112/434, 36/57, 36/11, 112/426, 112/475.26
International ClassificationA43B3/00, A43B3/14
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/14
European ClassificationA43B3/14