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Publication numberUS2432209 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 9, 1947
Filing dateOct 20, 1945
Priority dateOct 20, 1945
Publication numberUS 2432209 A, US 2432209A, US-A-2432209, US2432209 A, US2432209A
InventorsOsgood Harry W
Original AssigneeOsgood Harry W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Driving tee for projectiles
US 2432209 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 9, 1947. w, OSGQQD 2,432,209

DRIVING TEE FOR PROJECTILES Filed Oct. 20, 1945 3 II I 4 -lll J Patented Dec. 9, 1947 iJNi'EED STATES FATENT OFFICE DRIVING FOR PROJECTILES Harry W. Osgood, Jackson County, Mo.

Application October 20, 1945, Serial No. 623,488

3 Claims. 1

My invention relates to improvements in driving tees for projectiles.

It relates particularly to a driving tee adapted to tightly and securely grip an impaling prong of a dart, of the type having in an end thereof a slot in which is secured a doubled sheet metal spring clip which clasps by its tension the prong of the dart.

One of the objects of my invention is the provision of a novel tee of the kind described having two oppositely laterally extending wings which cover the side edges of the prong receiving slot and prevent the prong from entering the slot at the side edges thereof.

A further object of my invention is the provision of a novel tee of the kind described which is simple, cheap to make, strong, durable, not likely to get out of order, which easily and securely holds the prong, and which is efficient in its operation.

The novel features of my invention are hereinafter fully described and claimed.

In the accompanying drawing, which illustrates the preferred embodiment of my invention,

Fig. l is a plan showing my improved tee being used to support in a teed position a golf ball dart that is being struck by a golf club toward a target.

Fig. 2 is a top plan view of my improved tee.

Fig. 3 is an end elevation of the tee.

Fig. 4 is a longitudinal central vertical sectional View of the tee.

Fig. 5 is a bottom view of the tee.

Fig. 6 is a to view of the spring clip which grips the prong of the dart.

Fig. 7 is a side elevation of the tee, showing a golf ball pronged dart operatively teed on my improved tee.

Similar characters of reference designate similar parts in the different views.

The base member I of my improved tee is, preferably, of substantially rectangular form, having a fiat bottom adapted to rest upon the ground, and an upper side which inclines upwardly and forwardly and has rounded longitudinal side edges. In its front end is a rearwardly converging vertical slot 2 which terminates at its rear end in an upwardly and rearwardly inclined hole 3 cylindrical in cross section. The base member may be composed of any suitable material, as wood, metal or plastic substance.

In the slot 2 is mounted a resilient gripping member composed of sheet spring metal doubled at the middle of its length into the form of a cylindrical barrel 4, which is inclined and tightly fitted in the hole 3. From the barrel 4 forwardly 2 extend in the slot 2, two parallel flat edge up portions 5 which are held by their tension tightly against each other side by side, so as to be able to tightly grip between them the prong of a golf ball dart.

From the upper edges of the portions 5 respectively laterally extend in opposite directions over the side edges of the slot 2, two fiat wing-like portions 6, which prevent the prong of the dart from entering the slot 2 excepting between the portions 5, thus assuring that the impaling prong of the dart will be gripped.

The golf ball dart shown, and which is teed on my improved tee, comprises a golf ball I mounted on a shank 8 from which forwardly extends the usual impaling prong, The shank is provided with the usual longitudinal radial feather vanes 9.

For closing and tightly holding the barrel 4 in the hole 3, a cylindrical piece of wood in is tightly fitted in the barrel, as shown in Fig. 2.

In operation, the prong l I of the dart is inserted vertically between the portions 5 near the front end thereof, as shown in Fig. 7. The prong is tightly gripped. A golf club l2 may then be used, as shown in Fig. 1, for striking the golf ball 1 of the dart, thus impelling the dart, prong first toward the target I3, as indicated in dotted lines.

Many modifications of my invention, within the scope of the appended claims, may be made without departing from the spirit of my invention.

What I claim is:

1. In a driving tee of the kind described, the combination with a base having a flat supporting underside, a forwardly and upwardly inclined upper side, and a longitudinal vertical slot in its front end, of means including two elements of resilient sheet material having two portions disposed edge up fiatwise side by side longitudinally in said slot and adapted to grip and hold upright the impaling prong of a dart inserted downwardly between them, said elements having respectively two fiat wing-like portions extending laterally in opposite directions from the upper edges of said edge up portions above and across the side edges of said slot.

2. In a driving tee of the kind described, the combination with a base having a fiat supporting under side, a forwardly and upwardly inclined upper side, and a longitudinal vertical slot in its front end, of a prong gripping member comprising a strip of resilient sheet material doubled on itself with its doubled end fixed in the rear end of said slot and having extending forwardly therefrom two edge up portions disposed fiatwise side by side and yieldingly held under tension against each other and adapted to grip and hold upright the impaling prong of a dart; inserted downwardly between them, said strip having two fiat winglike portions extending laterally in opposite directions respectively from the upper edges of said two edge up portions above and across the side edges of said slot.

3. In a driving tee of the kind described, the combinationtwith a base supporting member having an upwardly and forwardly inclined upper side and a longitudinal vertical slot in its front end, of a prong gripping member comprising a strip of resilient sheet material doubled 0n its elf to form a tubular rear end fixed in the rear end of said slot and having extending forwardly-therefrom in said slot two edge up porti ns ,disposed flatwise side by side and yielding-1y held "under tension against each other by said tubularportion Number 4 and adapted to grip and hold upright the impaling prong of a dart inserted downwardly between them, said strip having two wing-like portions extending laterally in opposite directions respectively from the upper edges of said two edge up portions above and across the side edges of said slot.

HARRY W. OSGOOD.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Date Sears et al May 26, 1908 'Rosengarten July 20, 1937

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US888660 *Jun 24, 1907May 26, 1908Charles W SearsGame apparatus.
US2087334 *Apr 10, 1935Jul 20, 1937Rosengarten Mitchell GGolf practicing device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2993696 *Aug 15, 1958Jul 25, 1961Demaline Donald ROutdoor game
US3009700 *Jul 6, 1959Nov 21, 1961Dolega Frank JGame apparatus
US3106399 *Oct 23, 1961Oct 8, 1963Development FoundationPlaying pieces for ball games
US3198526 *Apr 22, 1963Aug 3, 1965Smith Caroline HWeighted practice golf ball including stabilizer fins
US3427031 *May 4, 1967Feb 11, 1969Scott John MWedge-shaped golf swing trainer
US3437340 *May 3, 1967Apr 8, 1969Grise Frederick Gerard JAerial projectile
US3663015 *Dec 17, 1970May 16, 1972Milton T SwimmerBike jump
US3844558 *Jun 19, 1973Oct 29, 1974V GigliottiGolf game apparatus
US4722128 *Aug 8, 1986Feb 2, 1988The Dow Chemical CompanyLoading tool
US4858588 *Aug 22, 1988Aug 22, 1989Bozek John WArchery device with separate bending and lauching bowstrings and front end arrow launch
US5377988 *Dec 10, 1993Jan 3, 1995Westman; JimGolf ball practice device
US5383668 *Jul 22, 1993Jan 24, 1995Andrikian; Ronald V.Golf tee
US5807198 *Feb 27, 1997Sep 15, 1998Oddzon Products, Inc.Tossable game-ball device
US5833897 *Feb 27, 1997Nov 10, 1998Oddzon Products, Inc.Method of forming tossable device including game-ball unit
US6010419 *Sep 10, 1997Jan 4, 2000Oddzon, Inc,Throwing toy with non-spinning tail
US6042494 *Jun 11, 1998Mar 28, 2000Rappaport; Mark J.Throwing toy with retractable tail
US6220918Jul 6, 2000Apr 24, 2001Oddzon, Inc.Tossable ring airfoil projectile
US20080234064 *Mar 19, 2007Sep 25, 2008Paul AfflekApparatus and method for teaching golf
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/317, 473/578, 473/280, 473/278
International ClassificationA63B57/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B57/0018
European ClassificationA63B57/00C