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Publication numberUS2432541 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 16, 1947
Filing dateSep 12, 1945
Priority dateSep 12, 1945
Publication numberUS 2432541 A, US 2432541A, US-A-2432541, US2432541 A, US2432541A
InventorsMcclelland Peck John
Original AssigneeMcclelland Peck John
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adhesive bandage
US 2432541 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. '16, 1947. J. McC. PECK ADHESIVE BANDAGE Filed Sept. 12, 1945 FIG.

INVENTOR JOHN MG C. PECK' FIG. 4

ATTORNEY Patented Dec. 16, 1947 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ADHESIVE BANDAGE John McClelland Peck, United States Navy Application September 12, 1945, Serial No. 615,909

(Granted under the actof March 3, 1883-, as amended April 30, 1928; 370 O. G. 757) 3 Claims.

My invention relates to an adhesive bandage. It has to do, more particularly, with that type of bandage unit embodying an adhesive strip which carries a gauze pad that is protected by a removable crinoline backing,

One of the objects of my invention is to provide an adhesive bandage that carries an ointment impregnated pad which is particularly effective in the care of minor wounds to speed tissue repair and minimize scar formation.

Another object of my invention is to provide an adhesive bandage which carries an ointment pad, wherein the ointment pad is completely pro-- tected from contamination before and during use and wherein means is provided for preventing soaking of other parts of the bandage by the ointment carried by the pad and for preventing undesirable exudation of the ointment from the bandage unit before and during use.

The preferred embodiment of my invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing wherein:

Fig. 1 is a plan View of the bandage.

Fig. 2 is a side elevational view of the bandage.

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the bandage showing the backing strip being separated from the adhesive strip.

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3 showing the backing strip almost completely removed from the adhesive strip.

With reference to the drawing, I have illustrated an adhesive bandage unit made according to my invention comprising a strip I of adhesive cloth. The adhesive substance is on the inner surface of the strip I, as illustrated best in Figs. 3 and 4. Substantially midway between its ends the strip I carries a pad 2 which preferably consists of overlying layers of gauze, This gauze is of such a nature that it will absorb an ointment and is thoroughly impregnated with the ointment.

The gauze pad 2 is protected by a removable backing strip 3 which is preferably of crinoline material. This strip 3 completely covers the pad 2 and the adhesive surface of the strip I and adheres to such surface. One end of the strip 3 extends beyond the corresponding end of the strip I, as shown best in Figs. 1 and 2, to facilitate separation of the strip 3 from the adhesive s';rip I.

In order to prevent the ointment from exuding from the bandage unit in an undesirable manner, I provide areas on the strip I and on the strip 3, which areas overlie the pad 2, that are impervious to the ointment. These areas are preferably greater in extent than the area of the pad. Thus, in such areas the adhesive strip I is provided with a coating 4 on its outer surface and a coating 5 on its inner surface. Similarly, the strip 3 is provided with a coating I5 on its Outer surface and a coating I on its inner surface. The coatings may be of any suitable substance impervious to the ointment, such as paraflin, beeswax, or suitable resins. These c at gs Pr ent the adhesive strip I and the backing strip 3 from becoming soaked with the ointment. They prevent the ointment from exuding through the strips I and 3 before the bandage is used and from exuding through the strip I after the bandage has been applied to the patient, The pad 2 will normally adhere to the coating 5 even as the strip 3 is being removed, due to the ointment, but if desired, the coating 5 may be covered with adhesive on its inner surface so that it will more firmly stick to the pad 2 and retain the pad on the strip I.

Instead of using the crinoline backing 3 with the coatings 6 and I, I may employ a strip of wax paper or similar ointment impervious material of the same area as backing 3. Also, as a substitute for the layers 4, 5, 6, and I, I may employ layers of wax paper or similar material.

As stated above, the pad 2 is fully impregnated with an ointment. The ointment used may be of any kind such as white petrolatum, sulfa compound, boric acid, scarlet red, mercurous chloride, Whitfields, salicylic, ammoniated mercuric, zinc oxide, or coal tar.

Each adhesive bandage should be wrapped in an individual envelope after forming and should then be sterilized. The ointment impervious coatings will prevent seeping of the ointment through the strips I and 3 during the sterilizing process.

Before the bandage is used, it will be in the condition illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2. To use the bandage the extending end of the strip 3 is gripped with the fingers and is separated from the adhesive strip I, as shown by the successive steps indicated in Figs. 3 and 4. Then the pad 2 is placed in contact with the wound and the adhesive portions of the strip I are placed against the skin of the patient.

The ointment impregnated gauze pad represents a distinct advantage over the present type of adhesive bandage of commercial manufacture in that an ointment application is considered advisable in good surgical care of a minor wound to speed tissue repair and mimimize scar formation by keeping the wound edges soft and preventing scab formation. Further, an ointment medium is the best present day method of continual exposure of the wound to the action of 3 antiseptics, tissue growth stimulants and keratolytics. Drugs incorporated in a dry dressing are efiective only if there is enough exudate in the Wound to dissolve them. This is rarely the case in the size wound where the usual dry adhesive bandages are employed.

The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the Government of the United States of America for government purposes without the payment of any royalty thereon or therefor.

What I claim is:

1. An adhesive bandage comprising an adhesive strip, a gauze pad carried by said strip intermediate its ends and being impregnated with an ointment, the inner and outer surfaces of said adhesive strip being provided with an ointment impervious coating throughout an area greater than that occupied by the gauze pad, and a removable backing strip covering said ointment pad and overlying said adhesive strip and adhering thereto, said backing having an area extendpounds, boric acid, scarlet red, mercurous chloride, Whitfields, salicylic, ammoniated mercuric,

zinc oxide, and coal tar.

3. An adhesive bandage comprising an adhesive strip, a gauze pad carried by said strip intermediate its ends, said pad being impregnated with an excess of an ointment, the inner and outer surfaces of said adhesive strip being provided with a resinous coating impervious to said ointment throughout an area greater than that occupied by said gauze pad, and a removable backing strip covering said gauze pad and overlying said adhesive strip and adhering thereto, said backing strip having a resinous coating thereon extending over at least the area of said pad, said coating being impervious to said ointment.

JOHN McCLELLAND PECK.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PA I'E NTS Number Name Date 2,226,546 Bower Dec. 31, 1940 2,233,209 Herzog Feb. 25, 1941

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2226546 *Sep 24, 1938Dec 31, 1940Golden State Supply CoTransparent, elastic surgical bandage
US2233209 *Oct 24, 1939Feb 25, 1941Duke Lab IncSurgical dressing
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2476924 *Nov 8, 1947Jul 19, 1949Carl B StenvallAdhesive bandage and method and apparatus for making the same
US2553270 *Apr 2, 1949May 15, 1951Ecusta Paper CorpBandage
US2603213 *Mar 25, 1950Jul 15, 1952 Post-operative bandage
US2714382 *Jul 21, 1952Aug 2, 1955Solis Alcala MaximinoEmergency bandages
US2896625 *Dec 18, 1956Jul 28, 1959Austin Fannie BColostomy dressing
US2924331 *Oct 5, 1955Feb 9, 1960Kendall & CoAdhesive bandage envelope
US3297034 *May 21, 1963Jan 10, 1967Paulina PeavyBeneficial skin and tissue cover device
US3446208 *Jun 27, 1966May 27, 1969Alc LtdPorous polyolefin gauze
US3777754 *Nov 13, 1972Dec 11, 1973Plachy WMedicated disposable pad
US3872862 *Oct 23, 1973Mar 25, 1975Hume MichaelDressing and support combination for the treatment of indolent ulcers
US4573996 *Jan 3, 1984Mar 4, 1986Jonergin, Inc.Device for the administration of an active agent to the skin or mucosa
US5098421 *Oct 16, 1989Mar 24, 1992Zook Gerald PViscoelastic gel foot padding and medicating device
US6149614 *Jul 2, 1997Nov 21, 2000Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMedical adhesive composite and package
US7012170 *Nov 16, 2004Mar 14, 2006Tomaioulo Theodore BPuncture wound bandage
US7714183 *Jun 29, 2001May 11, 2010Apimed Medical Honey LimitedUse of honey in dressings
US8100290Mar 3, 2009Jan 24, 2012Edison Nation, LlcSpooled adhesive bandage dispenser
US20040127826 *Dec 30, 2002Jul 1, 2004Caskey Phillip RoyHoney in wound dressings
WO2007048171A1 *Oct 17, 2006May 3, 2007Tracey Lee EdwardsA medicated dressing for wound healing
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/48, 206/441, 602/57
International ClassificationA61F13/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/0203
European ClassificationA61F13/02B