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Publication numberUS2433327 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 30, 1947
Filing dateJun 25, 1945
Priority dateJun 25, 1945
Publication numberUS 2433327 A, US 2433327A, US-A-2433327, US2433327 A, US2433327A
InventorsScott Anderson
Original AssigneeIllinois Glove Company, Joseph Shmikler, Ray Shmikler
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Glove construction
US 2433327 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

S. ANDERSON GLOVE CONSTRUCTION Filecb June 25, 1945 2 Sheets-Shet 2 INVEN TOR.

5 to T T ANDERSON BYfiwwkic/P a of A TTOIZNEYS Patented Dec. 30,1947

GLOVE CONSTRUCTION Scott Anderson, Champaign, Ill., assignor to Illinois Glove Company, a partnership composed of Samuel Shmikler, Joseph Shmikler, and Ray Shmikler, all of Chicago, 111.

Application June 25, 1945, Serial No. 601,474

8 Claims. (Cl. 2-169) This invention relates to an improved glove construction and particularly to a glove of the fourchette type.

In making gloves one of the big problems is to provide sufiicient room in the fingers in order that the glove may be comfortably worn. Gloves in general are classified according to the manner in which this is accomplished. One such method is to insert fourchettes between the palm finger section and the back finger section of the gloves to provide the required room. This type of glove is generally referred to as the fourchette type and this invention is primarily directed toward the fourchette type of glove.

This invention is more particularly directed toward a fourchette type of glove wherein the seam is bonded by an adhesive or cement, rather than joined by stitching,

To my knowledge there is no glove on the market bonded at the seams by an adhesive although suitabl cements for this purpose have long been known. One of the main reasons why no glove cemented at the seams has been marketed, is the many problems involved in the manufacture of such a glove and this invention solves one of the major problems. In joining the fourchette to the front and back sections by stitching, the type and shape of the fourchette is not important where the only problem is one of stitching around the finger tip and in between the fingers at the base to avoid buckling, wrinkling and the like around the curved portion of the fingers since the operator of a sewing machine can readily overcome this dimculty by the simple means of gathering in the fourchette at the proper places. This cannot be done where gloves are joined at the seams by a cement since such gloves are not manufactured by a device like a sewing machine. Furthermore sewing is a slow proces compared with the process of making my glove as will be hereinafter fully described.

It is therefore an object of this invention to construct a fourchette in such a manner that it may be readily joined by cementing to the palm and back sections without wrinkling and buckling and which lends itself to being assembled commercially, rapidly and economically, which would not be possible if the existing type of strip between the front and the back portions of the glove.

It is a further cbjectof my invention to provid a reversible glove using my type of fourchette which is a major improvement in the art of making reversible gloves since it permits the use of cements for bondin the seams of the glove which was heretofore not possible. Reversible gloves have appeared on the market from time to time but they have never been successful since all used stitching in the seams. It is well known in the glove art that the stitching is the weakest portion of the glove and no matter how strong the material is, th glove quickly wears out and must be discarded since the seam is the first to wear out and therefore there has been no object in having a reversible glove since the purpose of a reversible glove is to enable the wearer to obtain more service from the glove by wearing it on either hand. By the use of my glove the seam is the strongest part of the glove and for the first time a reversible glove becomes a commercial reality. By actual test the seams on my reversible gloves are more than ten times stronger than a glove wherein the seams are stitched.

The bonding of the seams by a cement permits a less bulky seam and the bond may be made between the various sections of the glove so that it does not need to be turned after the seam is bonded. It is the present practice in making gloves that the seam is stitched inside out, which is an expensive and time consuming operation.

Any cement as long as it has good bonding properties for joining the seam may be used. Many of such cements are available on the market today. However I prefer to use a cement of the plastic type, either of the thermoplastic or the thermosetting type. Some cements require little or no heating to form a bond while others like thermoplastic materials require heating but in all cases it is usually desirable to apply heat to speed up the bonding process.

Some of the thermoplastic materials which I prefer to use because of their rapid bonding on heating include: rubber hydrochloride, vinyl; resin, plasticized polyvinyl chloride, vinylidene chloride, and various cellulose derivatives such as cellulose nitrate. However, it is also within the scope of my invention to use the following thermoplastic materials: polyvinyl acetal, casein and, its derivatives, cellulose acetate, polystyrene,

polyvinyl acetal, ethyl ,cellulose, polyvinyl formal," methyl methacrylate resin, polyvinyl butyrals, cellulose acetate butyrate, and vinyl chlorideacetate copolymer, etc.

Among my preferred thermosetting materials are vinyl resin formaldehyde, polyvinyl acetate; emulsions, and phenol formaldehyde resins.

material to be bonded, variou ,.sol ents may be...

used, such as toluol, alcohols, acetates. and the... like.

In general the adhesive after formingthebond should be pliable so as to leave the seamflexible.

Thermosetting materials form a bond with other materials upon heating in the presenceiof' a high frequency current, but thermoplastic materials. after theheating .stenmusLbe allowed. to coolto.fix.the-bond..

The cement. may bev applied; in ainumberof ways... It.v may be fed .into. the. seamin the. form of a-welt. However. itis. preferred. to. apply the. plastic materialin liquid .iorrn. along. theedges of the .seamboth. on.the..fourchette. and .the .front and 'back'sectionsand allow .to .dry vbefore assem: b1-y..-- Alsoeitnis. within the scope of my invention tomixthe cement with asuitab'le. binder. and .ex.-.1 trude it.intotheseam...

Another. methodincludes. tacking a; thin...strip of. adhesivev to. the .edgeof. thamateri'alito .be bonded...

The. cementmay. bebondedlintlie seamby. heating. inany suitable. manner. but.l2-prefer. to. useinductiontypeof. heating. because it. does. not involvahandling hot apparatus as isnecessaryindirectly appliedheating. It. permitsa better controlby theoperator duringbondingparticw larly. when formingthe .sharp. curves. required; in the fabrication of. glovea. Furthermore. such heatingispractically instantaneous... In addition induction heating heats, the materiaLuniiorm-ly. throughrthe. seam and does-not subject the glove. material to. a higherv temperature-than thecemeniitbond. The. frequency. of the current-used toi'orm-thebond byind-uctionheating mayvary, from severaL hundredithousandcto several. hundred. milliomcycles per. second depending, ongthe materialto. be. bondedandJhe-type. of adhesive usede In. general the temperature requiredv forbonding cements. andiparticularly plastic. c,e-.- merits.varieairomabont.10.Q? to. about. 25.0? C.

As a rulehighipressures are..no.t.require.d.to afjfeet. thebond but: moderate-pressures of two. to 5.0. ponndsper squareinch. have-.beencusedwith. beneficialresults... Enough. pressure. should-be. applied and in suchaimanneriasto. insure.the.-. formation, or? unitorm. siwlrnswcllv bonded- Various types of. gloyeematerialshave. b'eenused. in making.- my gloyeubutl my. method; of makinga;glove..is-.particularly useiulgin. themanuiactnre. of. cloth. glovesg In general. my elove. cQmD Eises; a palm... fin section... a; back finger. section; and. a continuous. fourchette-forining a. seamwitheachsection. and... bonded by: applying a cementto the. seams; and; heating; The... fiourchetteshave notches around.- eachfinger tip and incisions-.zin. obnosite edges... at the. basesbetweenithefingers whichmotonly provides sufi'icient materiaL to form.-.ae.lapetype. ofseam, but. a. fourchette... constructed in. this manner does nt-tendito buckle or. to wrinkle... whentheglnveiseniltstog th in; a..c.ommer.cial- 4 manner such as using a mold or press rather than putting it together by hand.

Other objects, advantages and uses of my invention will become apparent by referring to the drawings in which Figure 1 illustrates in perspective one type of glove. using a continuous fourchettewhich is made by my invention...

Figure 2 shows the type and position of the 3 notches and incisions in the fourchette for preventing buckling and wrinkling during the construction of the glove.

Figure. 3.,shows. a. variation of the type of incision shown in Figure 2.

Figura is aperspective view illustrating the manner-- of the. over-lapping of the seams and particularly showing the type of incision illustrated inFigure 3;

Figure 5 is a perspective view of a finger which is frequently desirable having the tip of the fingertapered in two.directions, one. direction .fromjronttobackand, one direction from side to side.

Figure 6 showsa variation in thenotches from Figure 2 which. is" preferablyused-in the finger construction .shown. in-.Eigure- 5.

Throughout the drawings-- the same reference numbers. will be usedfor. comparable parts in order to make thedrawings easier to follow.

Referring to they drawings, Figure. 1 illustrates in perspective, one. type. of. glove-which may be made by my invention. It-showsaglove of. the reversibletype inwhicn apalmsection I. and a.- back section 2 are-.formed.to.-..substantially.the same size.. and.shape.. Itshould. also. be noted that in this typeoigldvethe thumbmay be out as an integral .partot. the. patternfor; the. front and the back sections I andlalthouglritis possible to out. the ..thumb separately. and .add it later. to. fornilacomplzite. glove. Although it. isnot necessary, it .ispreferableto useacontinuous. fourahettealthougheachiourchette. section in-v between. the. fingers and.- the.-. sidewalls. of. the glove may be separate. sections. joined. together prior. to the final construction of. the. gloveor. during the construction.

Ref erring-to. FiguresLLand 2. the fourchette. has notched.portions-corresponding to thetip of each finger and'thumb.v as is indicated. by. using. the same referencenumbersin Figures -1.and2. The notched portion. correspondingto the little finger is indicated by thenumeral 4;; tor thethird fingerby; thenumeral 5;..for. the. second fingerv by the. numeral 6. for the, firstwfinger. by the. numeral.

. If; and. for the tipof thethumb by the numeral 8.. Furthermore in-this1glove..the fourchette. is. usedthroughout. as .the. joining. means between the front. I and .back .sec.tion-2 and the. four.- chette begins .at- 9..and. runscontinuously up..the. side oi; the glove. and. around the, fingers and, ends at point ID on the opposite side.

Theparticular. shapaot. thenotches. and the number of..thenotches arev.- relativelyunimpor.- tant provided. snfficient materiaL is; removedby the... notches...s.o that. when i that. portion; or the. fourchetteisbronght aroundtheetiponthe. finger. buckling -orwrinkling will not; result... Eurthen more. it.is importantnot. to havathe. notches. ex-

tend into the fourchette to such.,,an. extentthat suficient material. isrnotileihior oyerelapping. of

the front andbaclasectionson to. thefourchette to.

a...d.istance. greater thantheextent of notches in order. torprovide sufficient. material for coating amass? site edges of the fourchette 'are'made for the portion ofthe fourchette lying at the base between the fingers. It is not necessary that any material be removed by these incisions and it is preferred that no material is removed so that the material in between the incisions can overlap on to the front and back sections to provide a bonding area as will be more fully described in connection with Figure 4. Incisions ll, I2, [3 and M in Figure 2 are positioned in the glove construction in Figure 1 as indicated by the same numbers.

The glove illustrated in Figures 1 and 2 was made in the following manner: The front and back sections 1 and 2 and the fourchette 3 were cut by the usual stamping machine using proper dies and the three sections l, 2, and 3 were coated along the seam edge using a thermoplastic material. It is preferable for ease of handling to allow the thermoplastic cement to dry before assembling. The three sections were then laid in a mold and this operation involves only about 15 seconds. The glove in the mold was then heated by induction heating at a temperature around 200 for about 40 minutes. The glove was then allowed to cool in the mold for about 30 seconds and then the mold removed. It might look from the above that it takes 40 min utes to make a glove commercially but this is not the case since hundreds of these molds may be placed in the same induction furnace at one time and by the use of only one cutting machine, one assembling station and one induction furnace a glove may be turned out about every 15 seconds which in itself is a remarkable improvement over previous methods for manufacturing gloves.

A glove made in this manner by actual test has a resistance to shear of over 500 pounds per square inch which is over times the shearing strength for gloves made by stitching.

- Referring to Figures 3 and 4, numeral l5 in Figure 3 illustrates incisions angling towards each other and towards the center of the fourchette and is one type of incision which may be used and has the advantage of providing a strong bonding area. This is partly shown in Figure 4 by the same numbers. In Figure 4 fingers I 6 and I1 constructed in the manner shown in Figure 1 have the front and back sections forming a seam area as indicated by thenumber l8. The spreading of the sections l5 by the incision also provides a large bonding area. A large bonding area is not necessary for a force exerted by pulling of the fingers l6 and i1 apart since the continuous fourchette itself resists that force. However a force exerted by pulling apart the front and back sections would tend to pull the seams apart if it were not for the bonding areas as indicated by the numeral l5. Therefore I have provided a construction of the glove which makes it possible to have the shearing strength heretofore mentioned.

Figure 5 is a perspective view of a finger which tapers at the tip both from front to back and from side to side and, this type of finger especially in a dress glove, is often desired. However this type of taper in the fingers makes it important to use notches of the type shown in Figure 6. The notched portion between numerals l9 and 20 must bend around the finger shown in Figure 5 between l9 and 26 so as not to form wrinkles during the glove construction. This is accomplished by first cutting the fourchette in a slow bending are or curve between points 2| and 22 and a hyperbola type of curve has been found best suitable for this purpose. The notches 22 are then cut in opposite sides along the slow bending curve. The notches cut in this manner eliminate all wrinkling and buckling when the glove is assembled and manufactured commercially by using molds, presses and the like where individual attention cannot be given by the operator to each finger tip as can be done if the glove were stitched.

The above description and the various embodiments of my invention are given for illustrative purpose and are not intended to limit my invention which is-only limited by the following claims:

I claim as my invention:

1. A glove comprising preformed palm section, a preformed back section, and a preformed fourchette, said fourchette having a plurality of V-shaped notches around the finger tips, said palm section and said back section having their marginal edges joined in overlapping manner with the marginal edges of said fourchette throughout the entire periphery of said palm and back section, a heat-responsive, plastic, water impervious bonding agent disposed between said marginal edges and constituting the sole bonding means for said marginal edges, said marginal edges being free from stitching extending therethrough.

2. A glove comprising a preformed palm section, a preformed back section, and a preformed fourchette, said fourchette having a plurality of V-shaped notches around the finger tips, said palm section and said back section having their marginal edges joined in overlapping manner with the marginal edges of said fourchette throughout the entire periphery of said palm and back section, a thermosetting, water-impervious bonding agent disposed between said marginal edges and constituting the sole bonding means for said marginal edges, said marginal edges being free from stitching extending therethrough.

3. A glove comprising a preformed palm section, a preformed back section, and a preformed fourchette, said fourchette having a plurality of V-shaped notches around the finger tips, said palm section and said back section having their marginal edges joined in over-lapping manner with the marginal edges of said fourchette throughout the entire periphery of said palm and back section, a thermo-plastic, water-impervious bonding agent disposed between said marginal edges and constituting the sole bonding means for said marginal edges, said marginal edges being free from stitching extending therethrough.

4. A glove comprising a preformed palm section, a preformed back section, and a preformed fourchette, said fourchette having opposing incisions in opposite edges at the base between the fingers, said palm section and said back section having their marginal edges joined in over-lapping manner with the marginal edges of said fourchette throughout the entire periphery of said palm and back section, a heat-responsive, plastic, water-impervious bonding agent disposed between said marginal edges and constituting the sole bonding means for said marginal edges, said marginal edges being free from stitching extending therethrough.

5. A hand covering comprising a preformed palm section, a preformed back section, and a preformed fourchette, said fourchette having a plurality of V-shaped notches around the finger tips and having opposing incisions in opposite edges attheibase .hetweenithe finger tipszisacld palm section and said vbac-lcsectiorr havingttheir' marginal edges joined over-lapping manner with. the marginal edges of? said; fourchette throughout the entire-periphery oisaid palm and back section, a; heateresponsive, plastic, water impervious bonding agent disposedbetweensaid marginal edges: and constituting the: sole bonding means for. said marginal edges, said marginal edges being free from stitching extendingtherethrough.

6.. A method of making a reversible-glovecomprising preforming substantially identical palm and back sections; preiorming a continuous four, chette having a pluralityofiV-shaped notches around the fingers tips, placing a heat-responsive, plastic, waterrimpervious. bonding; agent. along thev marginal. edges of said palm and. back sections and said fourchetteyoverlapping theamai ginal edges of said: palm and back sectionson-said marginal edges of, said fourchettezsuch thatzboth said palm and back sections. overlap the: fourchette on the outside of the glove;- and their bonding said marginal edgesvby heating,

'7. A method of making a reversible glove cont prising'preforming substantially identical palm and back sections; preforming a continuous fourchette: having incisions: on opposite; edgesvat the base between the finger tips; placing a;- heatrespon-sive,. plastic water-impervious; bonding agent-along the marginal edges of. said-palmlancl backsections. and said fourchette; .overlappingthe 8 marginaledgeszofsaid palm'and back sections on saidmazrginal edges" of saidfourchette such that both said palm and back'sectionsl overlap the fbUIChBttB-JOD; the outside ofttheglove; and then bonding said marginal i edges by heating.

8; Amethod of making a reversible glove comprising preforming substantially identical palm and back sections preforming a continuous fourchette having a plurality of V-shaped notches around the finger tips and incisions on cppositeedges at the base between the fingers; placing a heat-responsive, plastic, water-imperviousbonding agent along the: marginal edges ofsaid; palm andibacktvsections and said fourchette; overlapping: themarginal edges of said palmand back sections on said marginal edges of said fourchette such that bothsaid palm and back sections overlap the fourchetteon the outsideof the glove; and then bonding said marginal edgesby heating.

SCOTT ANDERSON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1209648 *Jun 16, 1916Dec 19, 1916Lorenz MutherMethod of finishing the edges of boots and shoes.
US1625368 *Mar 30, 1926Apr 19, 1927Kurz Gustave AHand covering
US2298959 *Dec 16, 1939Oct 13, 1942Mcclurken Marjorie LGlove for either hand
US2394532 *Jan 10, 1945Feb 12, 1946Illinois Glove CompanyHand covering
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2449337 *Nov 26, 1947Sep 14, 1948Robert SteinbergWork gloves
US2525378 *Dec 8, 1945Oct 10, 1950Shmikler JosephMethod of making improved hand coverings
US2970317 *Jul 22, 1960Feb 7, 1961Jonathan WinsonGlove and method of manufacture thereof
US4987614 *Apr 19, 1990Jan 29, 1991Stongwater MurrayReinforced glove for inhibiting runs
US5857216 *Nov 15, 1996Jan 12, 1999Gold; DannyPre-curved gloves and mitts construction and methods of construction
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/169
International ClassificationA41D19/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41D19/00
European ClassificationA41D19/00