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Publication numberUS2433356 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 30, 1947
Filing dateJan 6, 1945
Priority dateJan 6, 1945
Publication numberUS 2433356 A, US 2433356A, US-A-2433356, US2433356 A, US2433356A
InventorsFrench Edward A
Original AssigneeBirtman Electric Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable wheel mounting for tank type suction cleaners
US 2433356 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 30,v 1947. E; A. FRENCH ADJUSTABLE WHEEL MOUNTING FOR TANK .TYPE sucToN CLEANERS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. lrs,Y 13215 iM/,.3 /1 M Patented Dee. so, 1941 ADJUSTABLE WHEEL MOUNTING FOR TANK TYPE SUCTION CLEANERS Edward A. French, Chicago, Ill., assignor to Birtman Electric Company, a corporation of Illinois Application January 6. 1945, Serial No. 571,572

(Cl. 28o- 43) l11 Claims.

This invention relates to an improved tanktype suction cleaner of the kind in which a tank rests upon the floor and the cleaning nozzle is attached to one end of the tank.

Suction cleaners of this type are in common use at the present time as they have various advantages over the ordinary floor type. However, one of the chief disadvantages is that the tank rests upon the floor and when it is necessary to remove the dust collecting bag to empty it, it is necessary to stoop over and either work in this stoopedl position or lift the tank from the iioor. This requires a considerable amount of effort and for that reason many users are not entirely satisfied with the tank-type cleaner. In the cleaner of this invention I have provided a structure whereby the tank may be raised to an elevated position giving ready access to the front end of the tank from which the dust collecting bag may be removed. Such a structure reduces the labor required in using the cleaner and for this `reason has decided advantages over the ordinary types. l

The invention will be described in detail as exemplified inthe embodiment shown in the accompanying drawings. In the drawings,- Fig. 1 is a side elevation of my improved cleaner with the tank shown in elevated position by dotted lines; Fig. 2 is a drawing in elevation of the lower rear end section of the tank; Fig. 3 is a rear elevation of the tank; and Fig. 4 is a view of the bottom rear portion of the tank.

In the improved tank-type suction cleaner, as shown, there is the usual horizontal tank Il) adapted to rest on the iloor on two wheels II at the rear of the tank and a fixed spacing mem- .ber I2 near the front. The hose and wand connections are not shown but are made at the front of the tank as indicated at I3.

In the improved cleaner which is the subject of this invention it is provided that the tank III of the cleaner ordinarily rest in horizontal position. When it is desired to remove the dust collecting bag (not shown), the tank may be elevated at the front so that the front end extends up into the air at an angle to the iioor. The tank is then maintained in this position until it is desired to lower it again. These results are accomplished by providing an axle structure I4 upon which the two rear wheels II are mounted and a pair of horizontal extensions I5 from each end of the axle Il hingedly attached to the tank. This attachment can conveniently be accomplished by providing two fixed ears IB mounted on the tank at right angles 2 thereto and at points nearer the rear end oi the tank than the wheels. In order to hold the wheels against the tank when it is in horizontal position, there is provided a pair of springs I1 each extending from the wheel structure to the tank. These springs are so arranged that; when the tank is turned about its hinge to elevated position, the springs are then below the hinge and hold the tank in its elevated position. Then after the dust collecting bag or other means is removed and cleaned, the tank may then be lowered to its normal horizontal position.

In order 'to make the tank easy to raise and lower, there is provided a fixed foot bar I8 extending out on both sides of the' tank beyond the horizontal extensions. There is also provided on vtop of the tank an ordinary handle I3. Thus the user can put his foot on the foot bar to hold the wheels d own and raise the tank to elevated position by means of the handle. As can be seen, only a minimum amount of stooping and 'lifting is required. The springs which hold the tank in elevated position may conveniently be attached to this foot bar,

Although the invention has been described as related to one embodiment of the same, it is my intention that the invention be not limited by any of the detalls of description, unless otherwise specified, but rather be construed broadly within its spirit and scope as set out in the following claims.

I claim:

1. A tank-type suction cleaner adapted to rest on the iloor or other base and comprising a tank,

a pair of wheelssupporting the tank located on opposite sides of the tank near one end thereoi', an axle structure upon which said wheels are mounted, substantially parallel extensions from each end of the axle hingedly attached to the tank near said end, means for turning said tank about said hinge to elevate the tank with the end opposite the wheels extending at an angle to the oor and with each extension thereby assuming a greater angle with respect to the longitudinal axis of the tank, and means for maintaining the tank in said elevated position.

2. A tank-type suction cleaner adapted to rest on the floor or other base and comprising a tank, a pair of 'wheels supporting the tank located on opposite sides of the tank near the rear end thereof, an axle structure upon which said wheels are mounted, substantially parallel extensions lfrom each end of the axle hingedly attached to the tank at points nearer the rear end of the tank than the wheels, means for turning the tank about said hinge to elevate the front end of the tank and with each extension thereby assuming a greater angle with respect to the longitudinal axis of the tank, and means for maintaining the tank in said elevated position.

3. A tank-type suction cleaner adapted to rest on the oor or other base and comprising a tank, a pair of wheels supporting the tank located on opposite sides of the tank near the rear end thereof, an axle structure upon which said wheels are mounted, substantially parallel extensions from each end of the axle hingedly attached to xed ears mounted on thetank at points nearer the rear end of the tank than the wheels, a handle on top of the tank for turning it about'said hinge to elevate the front end of the tank and increase the angle between each extension and the longitudinal axis of the tank, and means for maintaining the tank in said elevated position.

4. A tank-type suction cleaner adapted to rest on the floor or other base and comprising a tank, a pair of wheels supporting the tank located at opposite sides of the tank near the rear end thereof, an axle structure upon which said wheels are mounted, substantially parallel extensions from each end of the axle hingedly attached to fixed ears mounted on the tank at right angles thereto and nearer the rear end of the tank than the wheels, means for turning the tank about said hinge to elevate the front end and increase the angle between each extension and the longitudinal axis of the tank, said means consisting of a handle o-n top of the tank and a fixed foot bar on the said parallel extensions for holding the wheels down, and means for maintaining the tank in said elevated position.

5. A tank-type suction cleaner adapted to rest on the iioor or other base and comprising a tank, a pair of wheels supporting the tank located at opposite sides of the tank near the rear end thereof, an axle structure upon which said wheels are mounted, substantially horizontal parallel extensions from each end of the axle hingedly attached to xed ears mounted on the tank at right angles thereto and nearer the rear end of the tank than the wheels, means for turning the tank about said hinge to elevate the front end and increase the angle between each extension and the longitudinal axis of the tank, said means consisting of a handle on top of the tank and a fixed foot bar on the said parallel extensions for holding the wheels down, and springs extending from the foot bar to the tank so constructed and arranged that they hold the wheels against the tank when said tank is in horizontal position but when the tank is in elevated position they hold it in said elevated position by reason of then being below the said hinge.

6. A tank-type cleaner adapted to rest on the floor or other base and comprising a tank structure, a pair oi' wheels supporting the tank 1ocated on opposite sides of the tank near the rear end thereof, an axle structure upon which said wheels are mounted, substantially parallel extensions from near each end of the axle hingedly attached to the tank at points nearer the rear end of the tank than the axle structure, means for turning the tank about said hinge to elevate the front end of the tank with the wheels remaining on the iloor, and means for maintaining the tank in said elevated position with the tank balanced on the wheels and the rear lower portion of the tank structure.

7. The tank-type cleaner of claim 6 wherein said extensions have substantially the same position relative to the oor when the tank structure is in lowered and in elevated position.

8. A tank-type cleaner adapted to rest on the door or other base and comprising a tank structure, depending substantially parallel ears ilxed to the tank structure near the end thereof and extending from opposite sides of the center of the tank structure toward the floor, substantially parallel extensions hingedly connected to said ears and extending toward the front end of the tank structure, an axle held by the front ends of said extensions with the axle passing under the tank structure, wheels on the ends of said axle for supporting the rear end of said tank structure, means for turning the tank about said hinges to elevate the front end of the tank with the wheels remaining on the door, and means for maintaining the tank in said elevated position with the tank balanced on the wheels and the rear lower portion of the tank structure.

9. The tank-type cleaner of claim 8 wherein said extensions have substantially the same position relative to the o'or when the tank structure is in lowered and in elevated position.

l0. 'I'he tank-type cleaner of claim 8 wherein said extensions are substantially parallel to the iioor when the tank structure is in lowered and in elevated position.

11. The tank-type cleaner of claim 5 wherein the cleaner is balanced on the wheels and the rear lower portion of the tank when the tank is in elevated position.

EDWARD A. FRENCH.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the ille of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Berg Nov. 2, 1943

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1744414 *Mar 23, 1926Jan 21, 1930Joseph H PflaumGolf-bag attachment
US1955463 *Jan 16, 1932Apr 17, 1934Alfred L LathropGolf bag
US2241773 *Dec 7, 1938May 13, 1941Electrolux CorpVacuum cleaner
US2333460 *Jan 27, 1941Nov 2, 1943Hoover CoSuction cleaner
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2668061 *Mar 23, 1953Feb 2, 1954Kuda Edward GCollapsible and extensible luggage carrier
US3015123 *Oct 16, 1959Jan 2, 1962Electrolux AbVacuum cleaner with wheeled undercarriage
US3711110 *Feb 18, 1971Jan 16, 1973Logerquist JTruck for tool box
US4809395 *Oct 28, 1987Mar 7, 1989Fleischhauer Eugene TCanister type vacuum cleaner
US5676702 *Dec 1, 1995Oct 14, 1997Tornier S.A.Elastic disc prosthesis
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/43.24, 15/327.2, D32/24, 280/30, 280/645
International ClassificationA47L5/22, A47L5/36, A47L9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/009, A47L5/362
European ClassificationA47L9/00E, A47L5/36A