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Publication numberUS2433594 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 30, 1947
Filing dateAug 22, 1946
Priority dateAug 22, 1946
Publication numberUS 2433594 A, US 2433594A, US-A-2433594, US2433594 A, US2433594A
InventorsCalo Carlo
Original AssigneeCalo Carlo
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drum stand
US 2433594 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. CALO DRUM S TAND Dec. 30, 1947. I

Filed Aug. 22, 1946 cA/Pw' 0/140' Patented Dec. 30, 1947 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,433,594 DRUM STAND Carlo Calo, Iron Mountain, Mich. Application August 22, 1946, Serial No. 692,265 1 4 Claims. (Cl. 84-421) This invention relates to improvements in drum stands, and more particularly to stands designed to support drums of the general type colloquially known as snare drums and especially when the latter are used by drummers operating in fixed (non-marching) location; trap-drummers are illustrative of the type.

Trap-drummers generally are called upon to operate any of a number of instruments-drums, cymbals, xylophones, etc.-these including a snare drum. Since the drummer is generally seated to permit use'of both his hands and feet, the instruments are grouped about him in such manner that he can readily operate any of them from his seated position. Because of this condition, it is necessary that the active drum head be so located as to its position among the instruments and at the most efficient angle-dependent some-- what upon the selected psiti0nto permit rapid' shift between instruments and to provide efficient drumming activity when the drum is to be active. Hence, a stand or support is practically essential for supporting the drum.

Stands or supports for this purpose have heretofore been contemplated and placed in service, these being of various types, but these generally have not been found completely satisfactory, due to a number of conditions. For instance, the structure should be of a form as to provide a neat and attractive appearance, since the service is such as to be within the vision of theaudience; this has led to the use of varied forms in an effort to provide a graceful appearance-this generally including the use of legs designed to provide a large base effect needed to maintain the stand against tilting, etc. The structures generally include means for supporting the drum per se, with the means arranged to permit adjustment of the plane of the active drum head, thus requiring adjustable operating connections between the standard rising from the base and such supporting means with the connections providing for the adjustments; in practice, these connections have generally provided for off-set relationships through the connections utilized, a condition which tends to render the stand somewhat vulnerable in service, due to the particular conditions of the service.

For instance, the drummer is required to provide-his strokes as heavy or light depending upon the nature of the music; since the active drumhead is taut, heavy strokes by the drum sticks provide material pressure conditions on the head with an inherent reaction due to the diaphragm characteristic of the head. Hence, there may be excessive pressure placed upon the stand with a tendency to provide pseudo or actual collapse of the stand, or, through the reaction of the head to the stroke, tend to set up what is known to drummers as the bouncea tendency to slightly raise the stand from the supporting surface, a condition which tends to disturb the efiiciency of the playing, and may tend to shift the position of the stand itself, depending upon the particular plane of the activ head being employed by the performer, and in this way disturb the desired relative positions of the instrument grouping with the possibility of occasional shifting of the support required to correct the condition.

The present invention is of this general type it is capable of providing the various adjustments needed for service conditionsbut is varied from prior structures in such way as to practically eliminate the conditions of bounce and of the collapse, thus rendering the structure more efiicient in service, while producing a neat and attractive appearance to the stand; in addition, the assembly is simple and efficient in operation, durable in construction, and can b produced under reasonable cost conditions.

To these and other ends, therefore, the nature of which will be more readily understood as the invention is hereinafter disclosed, said invention consists in the improved constructions and combinations of parts hereinafter more fully described, illustrated in the accompanying drawings, and more particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawings, in which similar reference characters indicat similar parts in each of the views:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a stand of the type of the present invention with a drum in position thereon. I

Figure 2 is a fragmentary perspective View on an enlarged "scale showing important parts of the invention, the view presenting some of the parts as broken away for the purpose of more clearly illustrating the invention.

Figure 3 is a detail view in elevation of one form of clip for securing the drum in position.

Figure 4 is a similar view showing a difierent form of clip assembly.

Figure 5 is a detail perspective view of the ball portion of the ball and socket structure.

The stand of the present invention, in its de tailed form as shown, comprises generally a floor standard of fixed vertical height, an adjusting section carried by the standard and designed to permit the vertical positioning of the drum, and

the drum-supporting section carried at the upper end of the adjusting section. In detail, these structures are as follows:

The floor standard is in the form of a base I, shown as generally fiat and of circular form with a considerable diameter. The base carries a vertically extending tubular standard H, th latter having a threaded end l2 designed to be threaded into the base within the axial zone thereof. The lower end of the-standard may have acollar- Ha and a flange formation or washer lib-these may be an integral structure-for utility as well as appearance, the collar and washer enlarging the lower end zone of the standard and thus tende ing to strengthen the fioor zone and tend to relieve pressure on the thread zone where-thedrum operation is under conditions tending to provide pressure on the standard laterally of the direction of length of the standard. The upper end of the standard is also provided with a collar l3 carrying a set screw l4, which may be of burred formation.

The adjusting section. consists of. a tubular member l5 of: suitable length anddesigned to fi't within standard H in. a vertically-adjusted position, thelatter being obtainedthrough the positioning of the member and then tightening the set screw Hi. The upper end of member I5 is formed into a cup-like zone made up of a plurality of finger i6, preferably integral with the members but formed to be variable as to cup dimensions; the fingers are preferably of suflicient elasticity as to permittheir expansion and contraction and fashioned to normally tend to move to their expanded positions, thus providingthe top of the zone in its open position; the free end zones of the fingers, are each curved inwardly, as at 16a, so that the cup formation tends to flare outwardly from-the lower end of the fingers and then inwardly in the free end.

zones of the fingers. Between the cup-formation and the portion of the member body designed to telescope the standard is a thread zone I! which'remains exposed above thestandard.

Surrounding the cup-formation and having threaded engagement with the threadzone i1 is an elongated tightening nut i8, the length of which is such as to overlie the thread zone 11 and extend over the outwardly-flared portions of the fingers l6. Internally, the nut has its lower end zone threaded to engage thread zone i1, while the upper zone of the nut is formed with a tapered or flared face lBa which overlies the fingers l6. Externally, the nut is provided with one or more knurled band Hlb to aid the operator in rotating the nut to tighten or release the fingers H5.

The cup formation serves as a socket to re ceive a ball [9 from which extends a short arm 20, the latter being arranged to carry a laterally-extending elongated member 2|, the ends Zia of which. are bent laterally; the length of member 2| is sufficient to permit a drum A to be freely received between such ends; member 2| may be a single element passing through arm 20,. or be in two parts each of which is secured to the arm. Ends Zia are designed to carry a clamping element 22, which may be a pivoted element 220 as in Figures 1 and 3, or a slidable element (2217), as in Figure 4. Clamping element 22 is designed to grip head-tightening rods a or other suitable formations of the side of the drum.

as indicated in Figure 5, ball I! preferably carries a knurled zone I90, of a desired width and extending circumferentially of the ball-the location of the band approximates that of an equatorial zone, assuming arm 20 to extend from one of the pole of the ball.

From the above it will be understood that because of the ball and socket formation, the drumsupporting section is rotatable throughout a range of 360 whenever nut 18 is unscrewed sufficient to free the finger engagement with the ball; also that the nut is movable sufliciently to permit the passage of the ball through the open top of the fingers 16. When, however, the nut is threaded to apply pressure on the fingers, the inner faces of the fingers will have a tight gripping engagement with the ball, especially with the knurled zone l9a, such engagement preventing any movement of the ball within the socket. On the other hand, the tilting movement of this section is limited in range to that permitted by the arm 20 within the open topof the socket formed by the fingers; in practice, the maximum tilting range is approximately 6030 on each side of they vertical-this controlling the maximum angle to the vertical at which the ac tive drum head may extend; withinthis range, the entire knurled zone l9a will engage the fingers l6, thus-assuring proper anchoring of the ball in its adjusted position.

In practice, the angularity of the active drum head is based somewhat upon the position the drum is to occupy among the several traps-together with the personal preference of the drummer as to the angle which permits him to most efficiently operate his drum sticks from his seated position, he generally using the central zone of the head as the impactzone on the head. Generally, when the head is inclined, the mem ber 2| is positioned to extend from the high to the low side of the drum, thus placing any material latera1 variation in the impact zone-possible where the drum must be, made active in rapid succession to another trap instrumentonthe side toward the drummer.

In service, the gripping contact between the fingers l6 and the knurled zone lSa of the ball is such that the drum is definitely anchored in position, regardless of the angle of the head, and with the grip active throughout the equatorial zone of the ball. Hence the pressure placed on the supporting portion of the stand is distributed throughout such equatorial zone and. thus is generaly uniformly applied to the stand, and since the supporting portion-the base and the standardare weighty, the vibrationsv set up by the active head are ineffective to provide any material bounce efiect, whether due to a sustained rufile or heavy individual impact of drum sticks, the extended base being suflicient to prevent any material raising of any portion of the peripheral zone of the base; actually, the pressures, even with the head extending at an angle, tend to oppose such raising of a. base portion.

As. is apparent,v thev assembly presents a neat and attractive appearance, the base and stand.- ard presenting a slender appearance, weighted at its lower end, the slender effect being continued up to the zone of the member 2| and thus practically in the zone of the drum itself; above the base, the only laterally-projecting structure from the standard is the adjusting screw [4. and the projection of this is relatively small. As a result, the general appearance of the stand is that of a slender column. giving the. desired neat and attractive appearance.

Not only is the appearance enhanced in this manner, but the structure is especially suitable to provide the most efiicient service on the part of the drummer. As will be understood the seated drummer must extend his legs and feet forwardly when using the drum, and since the only real lateral projection is the baseupon which a foot can rest-it can be understood that the performer can readily and quickly swing to position for drumming action without moving into contact with the standard-no particular care need be taken in doing this since there is little liability of disturbing the position of the stand and drum and the absence of contact prevents any injury to the limbs of the drummer.

As will be understood, the ball and socket are axially alined with the standard, so that the weight of the drum and the pressures developed during service are generally applied in the direction of the base. This is actually true when the drum head extends in horizontal plane, and does not change to any material degree when the head is inclined within the maximum limitsreferred to. While, at the extreme limit of the range, the drumming pressure may be exerted angular to the direction of length of the standard-thus seeming to tend to cant the stand; such result, even at the maximum range inclination, is of no material effect, since the limit of inclination of arm 20 is substantially 30 to the vertical so that a material portion of the pressure is being applied in the direction of length of the standard as well as angular to such direction; hence, a considerable portion of the canting pressure is being neutralized and thus largely reduces the effective pressure application in.a direction to cant the stand. And since any canting must become manifest at a point on the perimeter of the base and must therefore materially raise the central zone of the base to permit the tilting action, the weight of the stand and drum above the base is active to resist such raising action of the stand, aside from the weight of the base itself; with a reduced pressure condition as above explained, the weight more than overcomes the pressure value and thus retains the stand against tilting as well as bounce.

While I have herein shown and described a preferred form of the invention, it will be readily understood that changes and/or modifications therein may be found desirable or essential in meeting the various exigencies of service or the personal desires of individual users; I therefore reserve the right to make any and all such changes or modifications therein as may be so found desirable or essential insofar as the same may fall within the spirit and scope of the invention as expressed in the accompanying claims.

What is claimed as new is:

1. A drum stand comprising a flat base of extended dimensions, an adjustable telescoping standard rising centrally from the base, a drumsupporting frame, and a ball and socket connection between the standard and the drum supporting frame to thereby provide a support for the drum frame and in which the support elements are axially alined and extend normal to the base plane, the ball and socket members of such connection being carried respectively by the standard and the drum supporting frame with the ball carried by the drum frame and having its center included within such axial alinement, the ball member having an equatorial roughened zone with the drum frame extending from a polar zone of the ball, the socket member having an open top to permit lateral swing of the drum frame with a limited range, said connection including an adjusting nut cooperative with the socket member to secure the ball member in adjusted position relative to the socket and to release the ball from the socket, the relation of ball and socket being such that co-operation between the equatorial zone of the ball and the socket will be present in all of the adjusted positions of the drum frame, said drum frame including an arm secured to and extending from a polar axis of the ball in direction normal to such equatorial zone, said arm carrying a laterally extending element the opposite free ends of which extend angularly to the direction of length of the element and in substantial parallelism to the direction of length of said arm, said ends each carrying means for removably securing the drum therebetween to thereby locate the axis of the active drum head in substantial alinement with the axis of such arm.

2. A drum stand comprising a flat base of extended dimensions, an adjustable telescoping standard rising centrally from the base, a drumsupporting frame, and a ball and socket connection between the standard andthe drum supporting frame to thereby provide a support for the drum frame and in which the support elements are axially alined and extend normal to the base plane, the ball and socket members of such connection being carried respectively by the standard and the drum supporting frame with the ball carried by the drum frame and having its center included within such axial alinement, the ball member having an equatorial roughened zone with the drum frame extending from a polar zone ofthe ball, the socket member having an open top to permit lateral swing of the drum frame with a limited range, said connection including an adjusting nut eo-operative with the socket member to secure the ball member in adjusted position relative to the socket and to release the ball from the socket, the relation of ball and socket being such that co-operation between the equatorial zone of the ball and the socket will be present in all of the adjusted positions of the drum frame, said drum frame including an arm secured to and extending from a polar axis of the ball in direction normal to such equatorial zone, said arm carrying a laterally extending element the opposite free ends of which extend angularly to the direction of length of the element and in substantial parallelism to the direction of length of said arm, said ends each carrying means for removably securing the drum therebetween to thereby locate the aXis of the active drum head in substantial alinement with the axis of such arm with the angularity of the plane of such head relative to the vertical determined by the gripped ball and substantially parallel to such equatorial zone of the ball.

3. A drum stand comprising a flat base of extended dimensions, an adjustable telescoping standard rising centrally from the base, a drumsupporting frame, and a ball and socket connection between the standard and the drum supporting frame to thereby provide a support for the drum frame and in which the support elements are axially alined and extend normal to the base plane, the ball and socket members of such connection being carried respectively by the standard and the drum supporting frame with the ball carried by the drum frame and having its center included within such axial alinement, the ball member having an equatorial roughened zone with the drum frame extending from a polar amsm zone or the ball, the socket member having an open top to permit lateral swing of the drum frame with a limited range, said connection 'including an adjusting nut co-operative with the socket member to secure the ball member in adjusted position relative to the socket and to release the ball from the socket, the relation of ball and socket being such that co-operation be tween the equatorial zone of the ball and the socket will be present in all of the adjusted positions of the drum frame, said drum frame including an arm secured to and extending from a polar axis of the :ball in direction normal to such equatorial-zone, said arm carrying a laterall xt m ing element the opposite free ends of which extend angularly to the direction of length of the element and in substantial parallelism to the direction of length of said arm, said ends each carrying means for removably securing the drum therebetween to thereby locate the axis of the active drum head in substantial 'alinement with the axis of such arm, said means being pivotally connected with the element end :to which it is secured.

4. A drum stand comprising a flat base of 18X- tended dimensions, an adjustable telescoping standard rising centrally 'from'the base, a drumsupporting frame, and a ball and socket connection between the standard and the drum :supporting frame to thereby provide a :support vfor the drum frame and in which the support elements are axially alined andextend normal to the base plane, the ball .and socket members :of such connection being carried respectively'by the standard and the drum supporting frame with the ball carried by the drum frame and having its center included within sucha-xial alinernent, the ball member having an equatorial roughened zone with itherdmm frame extendinsifrcmlawpolar zone of the ball, :the :socket "member having @an open :top to permit lateral swing of the :drum frame with a limited range, said connection in cluding an adjusting nut co-operative with the socket member to secure the ball member in adjusted position relative to the :socket and to release the ball from the socket, the relation of ball and socket :being such thatco-operation abetween the equatorial zone of the ball and the socket will be present "in all .of 'the 'ad justed positions of the drum irame,saidldrum frameincluding an .arm secured to and extending from a polaraxis of the ball .in direction normal to :such equatonialzone, said arm carrying .a laterally :extending element the opposite free ends .of :which extend angularly to'the directionof lengthrgi'tthe element and in substantial parallelism to the direction of length of said "arm, said ends each carrying means for removably securing the :drum therebetween to thereby locate :the :axis of the active .drurn head .tin substantial alinement with the axis of such arm, :said' means having .theiorm of a clamping rnernber'mounted on :the element end by which it is carried, with the clamping member adjustable-lengthwise :of suchend.

CARLO CALO.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1120;364 rBell =Oct. 3.1, 18'71 892,105 -White June 30, 1908 .1,239;653 Willard l Sept. 211, I917

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Classifications
U.S. Classification84/421, 285/322, 403/59, 403/142, 285/261, 403/90, 285/302, 984/257
International ClassificationG10G5/00, F16M11/14
Cooperative ClassificationF16M11/28, F16M2200/022, G10D13/026, F16M11/14
European ClassificationF16M11/28, F16M11/14, G10D13/02G