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Publication numberUS2434586 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 13, 1948
Filing dateFeb 6, 1945
Priority dateFeb 6, 1945
Publication numberUS 2434586 A, US 2434586A, US-A-2434586, US2434586 A, US2434586A
InventorsReynolds Harold B
Original AssigneeReynolds Harold B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electromagnetic pulsator valve
US 2434586 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 13, 1948. H. B. REYNOLDS ELECTROMAGNETI C PULSATOR VALVE Filed F'geb. 6, 1945 2 Sheets-Sheet l Jan. 13, 19 48. H. B. REYNOLDS 2,434,586

ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSATOR VALVE Filed Feb. '6, 1945 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 .fr J! Inventor flamidfi pe z w Patented Jan. 13, 1948 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSATOR VALVE Harold B. Reynolds, Oneida, N. Y.

Application February 6, 1945, Serial No. 576,455

4 Claims. (01. 3158) This invention relates to an improved electromagnetic pulsator valve for milking machines.

The primary object of the present invention is to provide a pulsator valve of the above kind which is very simple and rugged in construction, easy to take apart for cleaning, and capable of being readily assembled without the exercise of special skill or fine adjustments.

Other objects and features of the invention will become apparent from the following description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, and the inventionconsists in the novel form, combination and arrangement of parts hereinafter more fully described, shown in the drawings and claimed.

In the drawings, wherein like reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views.

Figure 1 is a fragmentary side elevational view, showing a pulsator valve constructed in accordance with the present invention.

Figure 2 is a plan view of the construction shown in Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a longitudinal section taken substantially on line 33 of Figure 2.

Figure 4 is a transverse section taken on line 4-4 of Figure 3.

Figure 5 is a transverse section taken on line 5-5 of Figure 3.

Figure 6 is an end elevational View, with parts broken away and omitted, of the pulsator valve shown in Figure 1.

Referring in detail to the drawings, the present pulsator valve is illustrated as including an elongated cylindricai valve casing 5 of a nickel alloy or other non-magnetic material and having readily removable end plugs 6. Trapping of air in the ends of the casing may be prevented by the common expedient of providing these plugs with suitable vent openings. Intermediate its ends, the casing 5 is provided with a pair of inlet nipples 1 adapted to be connected by suction tubes 8 with the vacuum spaces of ordinary teat cups, not shown. At a point diametrically opposite the inlet nipples l, the casing 5 is provided with outand it is noted that the closure plugs 6 are provided with central inwardly projecting stop lugs 52, for a purpose which will presently become apparent.

Recipro-cable in casing 5 is a slide valve I3 provided intermediate its ends with a diametrically disposed passage I4. The valve member I3 is also provided at opposite sides of the passage l4 and equally spaced from the latter with right angular passages l5 and [5a. It is noted that the valve member I3 is cylindrical and has a snug sliding fit in the casing 5, relative rotation of the valve member and casing 5 being suitably prevented by suitable means, such as a key 16' carried by the casing and engaging in a longitudinal guide groove l5 of the valve member l3, as shown in Figure 5. This insures proper position of the valve member l3 relative to the casing 5 when said valve member is inserted in the latter. It is also pointed out that the plugs '6 are of the same diameter as the valve member [3, so that they may be removed to permit removal of the valve member 13 from the casing 5 through either end of the latter. It will be noted that the valve includes only one moving part, and may be readily taken apart for cleaning, as well as easily assembled without the exercise of special skill or fine adjustments.

It is pointed out that the arrangement of th nipples I and 9 and the passages l4, l5 and I; is such that when the valve member I 3 is at one limit of movement, as shown in Figure 3, thepassage l4 connects transversely aligned ones of the nipples 'l and 9, while the passage 15a connects the other nipple 1 with an air inlet port i I which opens to the atmosphere. On the other hand, when the valve member I3 is at its opposite limit of movement, passage I4 connects the other aligned nipples l and '9 and passage l5 places the other nipple 1 in communication with the atmosphere through the other air inlet port H. The opposite ends of the valve member J3 alternately engage the stop lugs l2 to properly limit the movement of said valve member IS in opposite directions.

The valve member [3 is made partly or wholly of iron or other suitable magnetic material and is adapted to be alternately attracted to .opposite ends of the casing 5 by means of magnetic coils I5 and Ilia provided on opposite ends of the easing 5. Obviously, if the casing 5 were of magnetic material, energization of the coils would not cause the desired movement of the valve member. Any suitable means may be provided to alternately energize and de-energize the coils l6 and I 611 so as to effect the desired reciprocation of valve member l3. Examples of such means are numerous in the prior art, and specific illustration or description of the same is unnecessary herein.

It is suficient to say that corresponding sides of the coils I6 and lfia may be connected to a common return wire l1, while the other sides of the coils may be provided with separate feed wires l8 and |8a leading from a suitable circuit maker and breaker. It will be understood, of course, that the ordinary means is provided to maintain a partial vacuum in the suction line with which the tubes l communicate.

Assuming that the circuit maker and breaker and the vacuum pump or the milking machine are set in operation, the circuit maker and breaker causes the coils l6 and Ilia to be alternately and intermittently energized and de-energized. When the valve member I3 is moved to the position of Figure 3, suction is had in one tube 8 from the associated tube l 0, through the nipples l and 9 to which they are connected, and the associated passage l4. At the same time, the other tubeB and nipple 1 are placed in communication with the atmosphere by way of passage la, thus relievin the suction in the last-named tube 8. The

valve member 13 is then moved tothe opposite end of the casing 5 so that the first-named tube 8- is placed in communication with. the atmos- Dherc by way of passage 15 and the second tube 8 is placed in communication. with its tube by passage [4. Suction is thus alternately had in the respective tubes 8, sothat the flexible inner walls of the teat cups are alternately'expanded and contracted andmilk is supplied to the milk receptacle alternately from-one-teat cup and then from the other.

From the foregoing description, it is believed that the construction and operation, as well as the advantages of the-present invention, will be readily understood andappreciated by those skilled in the art. Minor changes in details of construction illustrated" and described are contemplated, such as fairly fall within the spirit and scopeof the invention asclaimed.

What, Iclaim is:

1. An. electromagnetic pulsator valve for milking machines, comprisin a cylindrical non-magnetic casinghaving lateral'inlet and outlet nip- D165 and provided at apoint between said nipples with a lateralair inlet port, tubes for respectively connecting the inlet and, outlet nipples to a teat cup and a suction line, a cylindrical magnetic slide, valve reciprocable in said casing and having transverse passages arranged torespectively connect said nipples and to place the inlet nipple in communication with the air inlet port when the valve member is at its opposite limits of movement, and magnetic. coils carried by and disposed about opposite ends of said casing and adapted to be alternately energized amide-energized for reciprocating said valve, member.

2. An electromagnetic pulsator valve for milking machines, comprising a cylindrical non-magnetic casing having lateral inlet and outlet nipples and provided at a point between said nipples with a lateral air inlet port, tubes for respectively connecting the inlet and outlet nipples to a teat cup and a suction line, a cylindrical magnetic slide valve reciprocable in said casing and having transverse passages arranged to respectively connect said nipples. and to place the inlet nipple in communication withthe air-inlet port when the valve member is at its opposite limits of movement, and magnetic coils carried by and disposed about opposite ends of said casing and adapted to be alternately energized and de-energized for reciprocating said valve member, removable closure plugs in opposite ends of the casing permitting removal of the valve member from the casing through either end of the latter, and central inwardly projecting stop lugs for the valve member carried by said closure plugs.

3. An electromagnetic pulsator valve for milking machines, comprising a cylindrical non-magnetic casing having lateral inlet and outlet nipples and provided at a point between said nipples with a lateral air inlet port, tubes for respectively connecting the inlet and outlet nipples to a teat cup and a suction line, a cylindrical magnetic slide valve reciprocable in said casing and having diametric and angular transverse passages arranged to respectively connect said nipples and to place the inlet nipple in communication with the air inlet port when the valve member is at its opposite limits of movement, and magnetic coils carried by and disposed about opposite ends of said casing and adapted to be alternately energized and de-energized for reciprocating. said valve member, and means to prevent relative rotation of the valve member and thecasing.

4. An electromagnetic pulsator valve for milking machines, comprising a. tubular non-magnetic casing of uniform cross section from. end to end, said casing having pairs of lateral inlet and outlet nipples and provided at points between the nipples of each pair with a lateral air inlet port, removable plugs in the ends of said casing, tubes for respectively connecting the inlet nipples with teat cups and the outlet nipples with a suction line, a slide valve reciprocable in the casing and formed of magnetic material, said slide valve having an intermediate transverse passage alternately adapted to connect the respective pairs of inlet and outlet nipples when the valve member is reciprocated, said valve member further having angular transverse passages at opposite sides of the first-named passage arranged to connect each inlet nipple with an air inlet port when the other inlet nipple is'connected with its associated outlet nipple, and magnetic coils disposed about opposite ends of the casing and adapted to be alternately energized and de-energized for reciprocating said valve member.

HAROLD B. REYNOLDS.

REFERENCES CITED The. following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 942,482 Burrell Dec. 7, 1909 961,960 Hicks June 21, 1910 1,030,010 Newell, June 18, 1912 1,405,104 Daysh eta]. ..l...Jan. 31, 1922 1,413,546 Warner u-.. Apr. 8, 1922 1,452,600 Hapgoocl .1- Apr. 24, 1923 1,885,110 Hulbert Nov. 1, 1932'

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US942482 *Feb 7, 1907Dec 7, 1909D H Burrell & CompanyMilking-machine.
US961960 *May 17, 1907Jun 21, 1910Vermont Farm Machine CompanyMilking-machine.
US1030010 *May 27, 1907Jun 18, 1912Vermont Farm Machine CompanyCow-milking machine.
US1405104 *Sep 23, 1919Jan 31, 1922Laval Separator Co DeMilking machinery
US1413546 *Mar 9, 1920Apr 18, 1922Alger Warner SewardMilking machine
US1452600 *Jan 17, 1922Apr 24, 1923Laval Separator Co DeActuating means for milking-machine pulsators
US1885110 *Jul 9, 1931Nov 1, 1932Laval Separator Co DeMiling machine pulsator
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2672887 *Jul 21, 1950Mar 23, 1954Tipton Heat Pump & Valve CorpMultiple-port valve for air conditioning systems
US3117553 *Feb 16, 1960Jan 14, 1964Babson Bros CoElectronically controlled milking installation
US3122149 *Jan 4, 1960Feb 25, 1964Hauk Milker Mfg CompanyMilking systems
US4391221 *Jan 19, 1981Jul 5, 1983Biomelktechnik Hoefelmayr & Co.Method for mechanical milk removal
US4450864 *Feb 5, 1982May 29, 1984Westfalia Separator AgFor use in milking installations
US4524720 *Jul 18, 1983Jun 25, 1985501 S.C.R. Engineers, Ltd.Indicating device for milking apparatus
US5449119 *May 25, 1994Sep 12, 1995Caterpillar Inc.Magnetically adjustable valve adapted for a fuel injector
US5479901 *Jun 27, 1994Jan 2, 1996Caterpillar Inc.Electro-hydraulic spool control valve assembly adapted for a fuel injector
US5488340 *May 20, 1994Jan 30, 1996Caterpillar Inc.Hard magnetic valve actuator adapted for a fuel injector
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US5597118 *May 26, 1995Jan 28, 1997Caterpillar Inc.Direct-operated spool valve for a fuel injector
US5605289 *Dec 2, 1994Feb 25, 1997Caterpillar Inc.Fuel injector with spring-biased control valve
US5720318 *May 26, 1995Feb 24, 1998Caterpillar Inc.Solenoid actuated miniservo spool valve
US5752308 *Jul 3, 1995May 19, 1998Caterpillar Inc.Method of forming a hard magnetic valve actuator
US5758626 *Oct 5, 1995Jun 2, 1998Caterpillar Inc.Magnetically adjustable valve adapted for a fuel injector
US6085991 *May 14, 1998Jul 11, 2000Sturman; Oded E.Intensified fuel injector having a lateral drain passage
US6148778 *May 14, 1998Nov 21, 2000Sturman Industries, Inc.Air-fuel module adapted for an internal combustion engine
US6161770 *May 4, 1998Dec 19, 2000Sturman; Oded E.Hydraulically driven springless fuel injector
US6173685Mar 22, 2000Jan 16, 2001Oded E. SturmanAir-fuel module adapted for an internal combustion engine
US6257499Jul 17, 2000Jul 10, 2001Oded E. SturmanHigh speed fuel injector
Classifications
U.S. Classification251/129.1, 119/14.28, 251/148
International ClassificationA01J5/14, A01J5/00, H02K33/00, H02K33/12
Cooperative ClassificationH02K33/12, A01J5/14
European ClassificationA01J5/14, H02K33/12