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Publication numberUS2434770 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 20, 1948
Filing dateSep 26, 1945
Priority dateSep 26, 1945
Publication numberUS 2434770 A, US 2434770A, US-A-2434770, US2434770 A, US2434770A
InventorsLutey William J
Original AssigneeLutey William J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe sole
US 2434770 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

- Ju 20, 1948. w. J. LUTEY 2,434,770

SHOE SOLE Filed Sept. 26, 1945 v INVENTOR. WILLIAM J. L u 75y Patented Jan. 20, 1948 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 5 Claims.

This invention relates to shoes and soles for shoes and the like. More particularly, the invention has to do with certain improvements in shoes, or the like, using wooden soles either as original parts of the shoes, or as additions or attachment soles for application ,to the ordinary types of shoes; it being the principal object of this invention to provide improvements in wooden soles that are especially suited for shoes of the heavy duty types, whereby added comfort and ease in wearing such soles is attained; whereby safety from skidding or slipping is insured, whereby the normal wearing life of the shoe sole is materially extended and whereby an insulating effect is accomplished that protects the wearers feet against cold or heat being transmitted thereto through the shoe sole.

More specifically stated, it is the object of this invention to provide improvements in wooden soles whereby the above desirable results are attained, through the application of a novel form of resilient, cushioning strip to the sole; said strip being set within a channel, or groove that is formed to receive it and is secured in a way that protects the securing means against wear.

It is also an object of this invention to provide wooden soled shoes wherein greater flexibility is obtained by separating the heel and forward portion of the sole and then joining them by a flexible member or hinge that retains them in proper relationship.

Still further objects and advantages of the invention are to be found in the details of construction of parts, and in their mode of assembly and use, as will hereinafter be fully described.

In accomplishing these and other objects of the invention, I have provided the improved details of construction, the preferred forms of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein Fig. 1 is a side view of a shoe with wooden sole equipped with the novel features of the present invention.

Fig. 2-is a bottom view of a shoe sole embodied by the present invention.

Fig. 3 is a cross section taken on line 3--3 in Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a perspective view showing the manner of securing the resilient strip in the channel of the shoe sole.

Referring more in detail to the drawings- In Fig. 1, I have illustrated a shoe with wooden sole l and having the usual leather upper I2 attached directly to the sole by tacks [3, as best shown in Fig. 3. It is the intent, however, that wooden soles embodying my improvement be provided for securement to the leather soles of shoes as ordinarily provided; such manner of connection as necessary or desirable being employed, for example, by tacking through the leather sole into the wooden sole. While no view of the drawing illustrates the attachment of the wooden sole to the leather sole of a shoe, this is to be considered as anticipated in the claims which are hereinafter made.

In order to accomplish the objects of this invention insofar as they pertain to ease, comfort, safety and economy, I provide the wooden sole of the shoe, about its marginal portions of heel and sole, on the under surface, with shallow squarecut channels l5, best shown in Fig. 3; such channels being approximately one-half inch wide and one-fourth inch deep in an adult man's shoe, but these dimensions could vary to meet conditions or requirements. The channel that is formed in the sole portion terminates at its opposite ends in the shank portion of the sole and spaced somewhat from the near edge of the heel, as seen in Fig. 2. The channel that is formed in the heel opens at its opposite ends through the vertical inner edge of the heel.

Located within each of the channels l5, and fixedly secured therein, is a resilient cushioning and anti-skid strip that is made up of a helically wound strip l 6 of rubberized fabric. Such a strip of fabric would be satisfactory if approximately one-half inch wide and adapted to be formed into a helix or coil that may be set down in the channel, as best understood by reference to the cross sectional View of Fig. 3. The diameter of this coil is such that when so seated, approximately half of it projects outwardly beyond the surface of the sole, to serve to support the wooden sole spaced above the surface on which the person stands. For example, in Fig. 1, a floor surface is designated by line H.

The preferred manner of applying and fixing the strip to the sole would be to start at one end of one of the channels, by securing the-end of the strip to the bottom surface of the channel, as by means of a tack, as at 20 in Figs. 2 and 4. Then to form the strip in a succession of helical loops, and as each loop is formed, to apply a tack therethrough to secure that loop to the sole. Such a succession of loop attaching tacks are designated at 20, 20a, 20b and 200 in Fig. 2. When the strip has been so applied to the full length of a channel, the ends may be overlapped, as at 25 in Fig. 2, and tacks 26 applied therethrough.

Material that has been found very satisfactory for this particular use of forming the helical strip I6, is obtained by'cutting ordinary automobile tire casings into strips. Such rubberized fabric has excellent wearing qualities and also possesses the desired resiliency, and non-skid effect. However, strips of material might be made in proper widths and thicknesses for this particular use.

While it has'not been herein illustrated, it is apparent that channels it might be formed directly across or lengthwise of the sole and the helical strip applied therein as before described.

To give more flexibility to shoes using wooden soles, and to overcome some of the disadvantages that there may be in using wooden soled shoes in doing certain kinds of work, it is anticipated that the wooden sole and heel portions might be entirely separated as by cutting through on the line 30 shown in Fig. 1, and then joining these parts by a short strap 35 or hinge of other suitable kind applied as in Fig. 1. r w

In lieu of the spirally wound strips of run-- berized'fabric, it is possible also, and has been anticipated, that solid strips of rubber. cork, or other suitable material might likewise be applied within the channels. I

Shoes equi ped with wooden soles embodying the present improvements have many advantages and uses. They are especially adapted for iiidustrial use where excessive moisture on floor is prevalent, such as in plants where dairy products; cheese, butter, etc., are inside. They are also desirable for wear on cold metal decks. on concrete floors or in shops having slippery or cold floors. The advantages attained by the extending of the strip beyond the sole surface; nainely, safety from skidding or slipping, comfort due to resiliency, and insulation value, are augmented by the feature of economy in that the sole will be long wear ing. l 1

The cushioning strip is adapted for use in either the one-piece wooden sole or'the two-piece, and it is likewise as well used on shoes of the type of Fig. 1 or when applied to leather soled shoes of ordinary ty'pes.

In actual test the strip has more than doubled the life of the sole, and when the strip becomes worn, it is a simple matter to remove it and replace the worn strip with a new one.

Having thus described my invention; what I claim as new therein and desire to secure by Letters Patent is-' 1. A shoe sole of the character described, and a strip of resilient, anti-slip material wound in open. helical form and affixed to the sole parallel with the bottom surface thereof as a wear receiving element.

2. A shoe sole of the character described and a cushioning and anti-slip member affixed to its bottom surface as a weight sustaining and wear receiving element; said member comprising a strip of resilent, wear resisting material wound in helical form and affixed to the sole along the line of contact of the turns of the helix with the sole.

3. A shoe sole as in claim 2 wherein the means of attaching the strip to the sole comprises tacks driven through the turns of the helically formed member at their line of contact with the sole.

4. A shoe sole having a channel formed in its bottom surface, and a strip of resilient, anti-slip material wound in an open helical form and fixed in said channel as a weight sustaining and wear receiving element.

5; A shoe sole having marginal channels formed in the bottom surface of its heel and for-' ward portions, and strips of resilient, anti-slip material disposed in said channels; each com; prising a strip of flexible, anti-slip material. wound in open helical form and laid in the channel. and tacks threugh the loops of the helix at their line of contact with the base surface of the channel.

WILLIAM J. LI'I'TEY.

REFERENCES CITED The foiiowing references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US81434 *Aug 25, 1868 George thompson
US509927 *Jul 26, 1893Dec 5, 1893 Rubber shoe
US2183899 *Sep 7, 1937Dec 19, 1939Urban UrbanyFootwear sole
CH76551A * Title not available
*DE173374C Title not available
GB244252A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4833795 *Feb 6, 1987May 30, 1989Reebok Group International Ltd.Outsole construction for athletic shoe
US5375346 *Apr 2, 1993Dec 27, 1994Energaire CorporationThrust producing shoe sole and heel improved stability
US5416986 *Sep 23, 1994May 23, 1995Energaire CorporationThrust producing shoe sole and heel improved stability
US5524364 *Sep 23, 1994Jun 11, 1996Energaire CorporationThrust producing shoe sole and heel improved stability
US5595004 *Mar 30, 1994Jan 21, 1997Nike, Inc.Shoe sole including a peripherally-disposed cushioning bladder
US5987780 *Jan 10, 1997Nov 23, 1999Nike, Inc.Shoe sole including a peripherally-disposed cushioning bladder
US6131315 *Aug 15, 1996Oct 17, 2000Nancy C. FryeFootwear exercising device
US6163982 *Jun 7, 1995Dec 26, 2000Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US6308439Dec 13, 2000Oct 30, 2001Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
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US6360453May 30, 1995Mar 26, 2002Anatomic Research, Inc.Corrective shoe sole structures using a contour greater than the theoretically ideal stability plan
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US6675498Jun 7, 1995Jan 13, 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
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US7930839Oct 7, 2009Apr 26, 2011Reebok International Ltd.Inflatable support system for an article of footwear
US8141276Nov 21, 2005Mar 27, 2012Frampton E. EllisDevices with an internal flexibility slit, including for footwear
US8205356Nov 21, 2005Jun 26, 2012Frampton E. EllisDevices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US8256147May 25, 2007Sep 4, 2012Frampton E. EliisDevices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US8291618May 18, 2007Oct 23, 2012Frampton E. EllisDevices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US8494324May 16, 2012Jul 23, 2013Frampton E. EllisWire cable for electronic devices, including a core surrounded by two layers configured to slide relative to each other
US8561323Jan 24, 2012Oct 22, 2013Frampton E. EllisFootwear devices with an outer bladder and a foamed plastic internal structure separated by an internal flexibility sipe
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US8601722Mar 1, 2004Dec 10, 2013Nancy C. FryeShoe and last
US8670246Feb 24, 2012Mar 11, 2014Frampton E. EllisComputers including an undiced semiconductor wafer with Faraday Cages and internal flexibility sipes
US8732230Sep 22, 2011May 20, 2014Frampton Erroll Ellis, IiiComputers and microchips with a side protected by an internal hardware firewall and an unprotected side connected to a network
US8732868Feb 12, 2013May 27, 2014Frampton E. EllisHelmet and/or a helmet liner with at least one internal flexibility sipe with an attachment to control and absorb the impact of torsional or shear forces
US20110138657 *Dec 15, 2009Jun 16, 2011Jill ChristensenSole for footwear for unstable surfaces
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/28, 36/59.00R, 36/33, D02/947
International ClassificationA43C15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43C15/00
European ClassificationA43C15/00