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Publication numberUS2435226 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 3, 1948
Filing dateJan 17, 1944
Priority dateJan 17, 1944
Publication numberUS 2435226 A, US 2435226A, US-A-2435226, US2435226 A, US2435226A
InventorsLanter Clarence W
Original AssigneeBirtman Electric Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Disintegrator housing with dishshaped sides
US 2435226 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 3, 1948.

C. W. LANTER DISINTEGRATOR HOUSING WITH DISH-SHAPED SIDES Filed Jan. 17, 1944 5 sheets sheet 1 W Wj Feb. 3, 1948. c. w. LANTER 2,435,226

D I SINTEGRATOR HOUSING WITH DISH-SHAPED SIDES Filed Jan. 17, 1944 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Feb. 3, 1948. c. w. LANTER DISINTEGRATOR HOUSING WITH DISH-SHAPED SIDES Fil ed Jan. 17, 1944 5 Sheets-Sheet s m 5 Egg E0677 a7; GZarezzce %&

Feb. 3, 1948. c, w. LAN'TER DIS INTEGRATOR HOUSING WITH DISH-SHAPED SIDES 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Jan. l7, 1944 Feb. 3, 1948. c. w. LANTER' 5,

DISINTEGRATOR HOUSING WITH DISH-SHAPED SIDES Filed Jan. 17, 1944 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Patented Feb. 3, 1948 2,435,226.. I DIS'INTEGRATOR' HOUSING-WITHEDISH- 'ClarenceWr Lanter, Du PageCounty, 111., .assigne or to .tman jElectric Company,.. cgrp oratiqn Application J anuaryfl, 19441,:Seriatz-Nw 51854.92 2 cl a (01. 241-86) "This invention rel-ates to a disintegrator or hammer. and more particularly to. a disin' tegratoriintended for. farm or large scaleusfe.

'iliheiinvention' is illustrated inthe drawingsin whichFigure 1 is a sideelevation of the'disinte gratorjfFigure 2 is a similar view, from the oppositeside ofthe .disintegrator; Figure 3 is ,afplan vleWfFigure eds a sectionalplan takenlalon the'line '4--A in Figure 6;.Ffigurej5 is asectional elevation taken along the line 5 in Figure'fif Figure 6. is a sectional elevation of the disintee grator chamber; Figure 7' isa side elevationof a modified form ofthe disintegrator. with por tions broken away; and Figure 8 is a view,.-par+ tiallyin section, takenalong the line 88 ofFigure 7.

.Theldisintegrator comprises a disintegrator. rotor'assembly In which is mounted upon-ahexag: onal rotor (shaft. l l J'ou'rnalled .in the. bearings. I2 anjdill3. 'The rotor consists of blades I5.directly carried by the shaft ll and-spaced from each other .in suitable fashion. .The blades .carry. the hammers l6which are-secured to the blades. by the pins Hand l8 which extend through a plurality of the blades. Thehammers. are preferably double-ended, being provided with the striking surfaces 19 and 20, each of which is broken up intoa plurality ofstepped faces:2|.

ferred to employ eight blades, each carries two hammers, one at each end. preferred to mount four blades parallel It is also upon the shaft and the otheriour blades at a 90E-angle therefrom, and the hammers carried by the blades are. so spaced that,as the. disintegrator rotates,fthe succeeding hammer faces coverthe pe ripheral area not covered by thepreceding set. In other words, the hammer blades are so staggered that "two successive .groups of hammers cover the entire peripheral striking area,

The structure and arrangement of the hammers is described more fully and is claimed in my co-pending application Serial, No.- 518,490, filed January 17, 1944.

The hammers are rotated in the rOtOr chamber formed by the split housing 26. This housing consists ofan upper housing 27. which includes the feed section 28 and a base. housing29.) The upper housin 21 and the base housing 29.are pivotally connectedat 30 and anysuitablelocking means are provided, such .as' the latch 3|; Within the disintegrator housing is the. grinding screen 25 havinga section a in the upper housing and a section 35bin the lower housing and which, for at least approximately half; of. the circumference of the circle formed by the hammer, is concentric with them. "It is desirable that the screen 35 be readily replaceable, and further thatthe means for mounting it-within the chamher be firm and yet not interfere with the passage of air or solid particles through the screen. This of which .2 a e sace m i h d n he re n .d eerbx, e i timatio -9i. c mpl me tar inte ral; gr o es 6, L B1= m1 9-; hep e n ase usin s; Itis preferred that the housingbe made o i sheet metalof suitable thickness, into which'the grooves,

' are-formedby any suitable metal-formingope from customary practice which is of value because;

erably. reiniorce -the strength .of the housinglalilld ti on,preferablybyt stamping; It will beobser d. atumnhpen n I -1 o g r l's se i latch 3i and raisin g of the upper housing ithe,

screenv 35;;is Wi thdITaWlT automatically: from {the roovesiiiaan'd w andmay then be manually drawn fromthe-lower,groovestiiand ,31.

The grooves, in addition: to providing for the screen whi oh is effective agains eit 1nwardly. or outwardly directed forces, do [no 0c;

ra rt oupyanypa'rtbf the chamber whichwouldo er is e useful.- q elpas as fa r 2 491 ti ta dt her o e- 9 no set u eddr re i or, tend to. cause blocking pithe. screen. Further;-

permitthe use of sheetjmetal-of alowergauge aThescreen terminates. on thelinside at' e.

brealger bars.- 40. E'Ihe location of thebreak in the rearhof thelrotor housing -isla. depa are of; the fact that the breakerqbars tend to cause formation. of .finepowder. to an objectipnable de tee whe her r placed, s is lr t amb t iii-the housing anterior. tothe screen. Inthepres ent device a great deallof material-willneverim pinge .upo lithecrusher bars but will be. carried insastreambetween. the hammers and the screen; li s t muehh l te i h u eachin the crusher .bars. The crusher bar. faces; are t, an angletwhich will; throw thematerial striking m aek e he r hi ans tha practically no; material should strike the face at. a right angle or greater.

Material; to be g-round or crushedis introduced to. the disintegrator. cham;ber frornthe trough; 4t

which is connected. to. the feed section, or opening 2 8 thro l htthe adjustable g ate mechanism 142. Thisa aite mechanism is of. customary typegand need not-be described further.

-The bottom1section:ofthehousingcompartment. is provided .with. the; cantboard whichextends. transversely ,across* the housing :andmdireiztsthe flow;of ground material which is. passedizthrough tities to produce an irregular supply of the material which causes clogging. Furthermore the positioning of the opening 46 toward the rear of the chamber tends to produce less drag upon the fan.

Suction is applied to the disintegrator chamber by means of the fan 50 having the blades 5| and mounted upon an extension of the shaft II. The fan is held within the fan housing 52 which communicates through the passage 53 with the outlet 46 and the disintegrator chamber. Powdered material is drawn through this series of passageways through the fan and out through the customary exhaust 54 to any suitable loading device, not shown.

As shown in Figures 7 and 8, the outlet or exhaust 46a is provided in the rear edge wall 80 of the disintegrator. In this case the exhaust 54a is carried up at an angle to the fan chamber.

It will be noted that throughout, the structure housing has been built up of sheet metal material arranged without sharp corners and shaped to provide the utmost in strength. As a result of the form of the sheet metal, the weight of the hammer mill has been greatly reduced so that a mill which formerly weighed around 550 lbs. can be produced with equal or greater strength and capacity and weighing in the neighborhood of 310 lbs.

These results are accomplished by the use of stamped material shaped and formed to put the material under tension so far as possible and by the use of a minimum number of auxiliary fastening devices. It is also due to the light weight of the disintegrator blades 15 which have been made lighter and stronger by the formation of bearing and other openings by means of an extrusion process. For example, the hexagonal opening 68 which fits the hexagonal shaft II is formed by extruding the metal formerly occupying the opening to form the flange 62 which encloses the shaft and provides an extra bearing surface as well as reinforcing the blades against lateral movement, and providing the spacing means. The same is true of the flanges 63 and 64 which are formed from the openings which admit the pins IT and it.

The side walls 65 and 66 of the disintegrator housing are disked to provide extra strength as well as a more suitable conformation for the disintegrator housing; and this shaping, particularly in combination with the displacement to form the grooves 36, 31, 38 and 39, permits the wall of the housing to be made of particularly thin material.

It will likewise be observed that the top corners 61 and 68 as well as the top wall 69 are stamped in rounded form to provide extra strength.

The fan housing is particularly characterized by the absence of the usual external bolts holding together the side walls 10 and H. The use of these external bolts requires an upstanding flange and a very considerable weight of metal which is avoided by the present structure. In this structure the edge wall 121 of the fan housing is provided with an inturned flange 13 to which are welded, at suitable intervals, lugs 14. Usually from six to eight of these lugs are sufiicient. The side wall H is provided with a horizontal flange 15 and with openings corresponding to the lugs 74 so that, on assembly, the flanges 13 and T5 are closely fitted'and the walls H and I2 are bolted together by suitable threaded nuts 16 on the lugs 14.

In my co-pending application Serial No. 518,491, filed January 17, 1944, there is set forth subject matter relating to the present invention.

The foregoing detailed description has been given for clearness of understanding only, and no unnecessary limitations should be understood therefrom.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a clisintegrator or hammer mill, a rotatable hammer blade, a disintegrator chamber defined by a housing about said blade, a unitary screen within said housing surrounding a major portion of the area of travel of the blade and concentric thereto for a part only of its length, said screen being so constructed and arranged that the screen has a greater radius of curvature at the beginning of the disintegrating zone but gradually diminishing until a constant radius is reached for approximately one-half the area of travel of said blade, an opening for introducing material to be ground into the chamber, an outlet opening for withdrawing ground material from a point near the bottom of the chamber, an imperforate cantboard sloping toward the plane of the outlet opening, and said disintegrator housing having dish-shaped sides with the concave surfaces thereof being toward said hammer blade.

2. In a disintegrate! or hammer mill, a 1'0- tatable hammer blade, a disintegrator chamber defined by a housing about said blade, a screen within said housing surrounding a, major portion of the area of travel of the blade and concentric thereto for a part only of its length, said screen being so constructed and arranged that the screen has a greater radius of curvature at the beginning of the disintegrating zone, but gradually diminishing until a constant radius is reached for approximately one-half the area of travel of said blade, an opening for introducing material to be ground into the chamber, and an outlet opening for withdrawing ground material from a point near the bottom of the chamber, said outlet opening being in the rear edge wall of the housing'with said rear edge wall being beneath the feed opening and away from the direction of rotation of said hammer blade, and said disintegrator housing having dish-shaped sides with the concave surfaces thereof being toward said hammer blade.

CLARENCE W. LANTER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS the

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1019762 *Dec 3, 1910Mar 12, 1912Louis Bertram CousansCasing for centrifugal fans and pumps.
US1433042 *May 4, 1920Oct 24, 1922Bernard Sedberry JamesGrinding mill
US1864920 *Mar 13, 1929Jun 28, 1932 Hakry b
US1930623 *Jan 20, 1930Oct 17, 1933Peterson Lloyd CFeed grinder
US2098480 *Oct 14, 1935Nov 9, 1937Ammon Charles DGrinder
US2172096 *Sep 11, 1933Sep 5, 1939Alfred Theodore CRotary hammer mill
US2175608 *Aug 29, 1936Oct 10, 1939American Monorail CoMethod of and apparatus for removing lint
US2230146 *Jun 25, 1938Jan 28, 1941Myers Sherman CoMixing apparatus
US2291815 *Sep 27, 1937Aug 4, 1942Deere & CoHammer mill
DE364941C *Dec 4, 1922K B Pulverizer CompanySchlagmuehle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3429349 *Sep 29, 1966Feb 25, 1969Ronning Richard LPull-through hammer mill
US5605291 *Apr 28, 1994Feb 25, 1997Doskocil; DavidChipper/mulcher
Classifications
U.S. Classification241/88.2, 241/56, 241/291, 241/285.3
International ClassificationB02C13/10, B02C13/00
Cooperative ClassificationB02C13/10
European ClassificationB02C13/10