Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2435816 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 10, 1948
Filing dateApr 7, 1945
Priority dateApr 7, 1945
Publication numberUS 2435816 A, US 2435816A, US-A-2435816, US2435816 A, US2435816A
InventorsFrederick Anderson
Original AssigneeAlbert Brearley, Vera M Bramel
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Telephone receiver support
US 2435816 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. "10, 1948. F. ANDERSON "2,435,815

TELEPHONE REGEIVER` SUPPORT Filed April '7, 1945.

Tij-Ef I INVENTOR.'

Patented Feb. 10, 11948 TELEPHONE; RECEIVER SUPPORT Frederick Anderson, Hawthorne, Calif., assignor to Albert Brearley and Vera M. Bramel, both of Monterey Park, Calif.

Application April 7, 1945, Serial No. 587,034

This invention relates to telephone instruments and has particular reference to supporting means for the transmitter-receiver of such instruments.

. In modern telephones, this part of the instrument (which for convenience hereinafter is referred to as the receiver) is removed from the instrument and held in position relative to the mouth-and ear by one hand, and this is a great improvement over older i types of instruments, where the mouth of the user hadto be kept close to the fixed mouthpiece of the telephone.

There are, however, numerous cases where mechanical means for supporting the receiver is urgently needed in order to free both hands for other necessary operations and the present invention is directed to` such mechanical supporting means. l

To this end, the inventionresides in the combinations` fully set forth in the following detailed description and drawings are hereto appended in which a preferred form of the invention is illustrated. In the drawings:

' Fig'. l is a side elevational view of'a device embodying the invention:

Y. Fig. 2 is a substantially corresponding front view of the device.

, The structure of my invention, inthe form illustrated in the drawings, comprises a support, or cradle I, rwhich is open at the front to receive the type of telephone instrument A, now generally used, The side frames la, Ib of the cradle rise above the instrument to receive and pivotally to support a cross member 2, from which rises a tubular post 3. A stem 4 is seated to slide within this post and it is at the top fitted to support the receiver B of the instrument,` as by a socket member or clamp 5.

A circular plate 6 is rigidly secured to one end of the cross member 2, and it is shown made with a notch 6 which is shaped to receive the upper end of a detent 1. The latter is adapted yieldingly to maintain the post and stem in the upright position indicated in the drawings. Experience has taught me that this upright position is preferable While the telephone is not in use because the device then is in the most convenient, out lof the way position. But the position` may, of course, be somewhat modiiied by adding other notches 6b, 6, should such adjustment be desired.

A cam III is secured to the cross member 2.for contact with a, resilient frame vI I, and the latter isshown fitted with a bar4 I2 which, in turn, normally maintains the telephone switch buttons C,

As claims. (c1. 179-150) 2 D depressed while the device is held in the upright position shown. Y v.

. The device of the invention should be placed in the position most convenient to theperson who wishes to use the telephone, and all that he is required to do in order to make use thereof is to swing the tubular post forward until the receiver `B reaches the desired position relative to the mouth and ear of the user.

It is noticed that a series of perforations or sockets 6d, 5, etc., are made in the plate 6 close to the periphery thereof, and that a plug is seated in one of these sockets. This plug'comes toa stop against the edge of the side frame I b to maintain the receiver support in the desired position.

Y Once the operator has determined which position suits him best, the plug I5 may remain permanently seated in the corresponding socket,v and it may be shifted to a diierent socket whenever change of position is desired.

The cam I0 is so shaped as to permit the switch buttons C, D to rise in the instrument casing when the receiver support is swung forward into operating position, and it again depresses the buttons when the support is returned to upright position. The resilient member II is shown fastened to the instrument side frame Ib at I3, and the bar I2 may be pivotally secured to the member II at I4 in order to equalize the pressure against the two buttons C, D.

Itis noticed that the tubular post is made with a slot 3, and that a series of perforations 0r sockets 4a etc. are provided in the stem 4. When not in use, the stem may be held fully retracted within its support and, when the post is swung forward, as aforesaid, it may be drawn forward into any desired position, whereupon a plug I6 may be seated in the socket 4 which is closest to the upper end of the slot 3a. When so seated, further accidental withdrawal is prevented, When the post is returned to its upright position, it is seen that the stem will slide back into its fully retracted position. The combinations and features above described are merely illustrative of a convenient manner in which the device of the invention may be constructed and it may be modified in various ways,

within the spirit and scope of the claims hereto appended in order that an efficient receiver support may be provided.

y As an example, it may be found'preferred to adjust the position of the receiver clamp 5, and this may be done by fitting the stem with a lbifurcated head I8, within which the clamp is rotatably hung, and it may be clamped in adjusted position therein by a screw I9.

As a further modification, it is pointed out that the device of the invention may readily be adapted for use in connection with older types of instruments, but as such instruments are rapidly disappearingfrom business places where the device of the invention is principally needed, and as such adaptation does in no way alter the principle of construction, it is not thought necessary to burden the specification with detailed descriptions and illustrations thereof.

1. A telephone accessory comprising, a cradle shaped to receive the telephone instrument, a combination transmitter and receiver support mounted in said cradle above the instrument for swinging movement in a vertical plane, cam means on said support maintaining the switch buttons of the instrument depressed While the support remains in one position of vertical adjustment and adapted to release said buttons as the support is swung vertically out of said position, means at the end of the support shaped to grip the receiver of the instrument, and means for maintaining the support locked in various positions of adjustment.

2. A telephone accessory comprising, a cradle shaped .to receive the telephone instrument, a telescoping transmitter and receiver support mounted in .said cradle forv swinging movement in a vertical plane, cam means on said support maintaining the switch buttons of the instru- :ment depressed while the support remains in one vertical position of adjustment and shaped to release ysaid buttons as the support is vertically swung out of said position, means at the enduof the support adapted to grip the receiver of the instrument, and means maintaining the support locked in various positions of adjustment.

3. A telephone accessory comprising, a cradle shaped to receive the telephone instrument, a telescoping transmitter and receiver support mounted on said cradle for swinging movement in a vertical plane, cam means on said support maintaining the instrument switch elements depressed while the support remains in one position of vertical adjustment and shaped to release said elements as the support is vertically swung out of said position, adjustable means at the end of the support adapted to grip the receiver, and means maintaining the` support locked in various positionsA of adjustment.

4. A telephone accessory comprising, a cradle shaped to receive the telephone instrument, a horizontal cross member pivotally mounted in said cradle above said instrument, a transmitter and receiver support rigidly secured to said member to swing in a vertical plane, cam means on said'member maintaining the switch elements of the instrument depressed while the support remains in one position of vertical adjustment and adapted to release said elements as the support is swung out of said'position, means at the endof the support adapted `to grip the instrument receiver, and means for maintaining the support locked in various positions of vertical adjustment. s

5. A telephone accessory comprising, a cradle shaped to receive the telephone instrument, a horizontalv cross member pivotally mounted in said cradle above said instrument, a transmitter and receiver support rigidly secured to said mem-v ber, means f or maintaining the support in various y positions of vertical adjustment, resilient means in the cradle extending horizontally across the switch elements of the instrument, and a cam on said cross member engaging said resilient means to maintain the switch elements of the instrument depressed While the support remains in one position .of vertical adjustment and adapted to release'said elements as the support is swung out of said position.

6. A telephone accessory comprising, a cradle shaped to receive the telephone instrument, `a telescoping receiver support mounted in said cradle for swinging movement in a vertical plane therein, adjustable means at the end of said support for grippingthe instrument transmitter and receiver, means for maintaining the support locked in various positions of vertical adjustment, resilient means within the cradle extending horizontally across the switch elements of the instrument, andI cam means on said support engaging said resilient means to maintain said elements depressed while the support remains in one position of adjustment and adapted to release said elements as the support is swung out of said position. I

7. A telephone accessory comprising, a cradle shaped to receive the telephone instrument, a receiver support mounted in said cradle for swinging movement therein, means at the end of the support for gripping the receiver of the instrument, means for maintainingA the support in various positions of adjustment, resilient means within the cradle extending across the switch elements of the instrument, a pressureequalizing member on said resilient means, and cam means ori-the support engaging said resilient means to move said equalizing member to maintain said elements depressed While the support remains in one position of adjustment and adapted torelease said elements as the support is swung out of said position.

8. A telephone accessory comprising, a cradle shaped to receive the telephone instrument, a telescoping receiver supportmounted in said cradle for swinging movement therein, adjustable means at the end of said support adapted to grip the instrument receiver, means for maintaining the support in various positions of adjustment, resilient means within the cradle extending across the switch elements yof the instrument, a pressure equalizing member on said resilient means, and cam means on the support engaging said resilient means to cause said equalizing memberv to depress said elements and maintain them depressed while the support remains in one position of adjustment butto release the elements as the support is swung out of said position.

FREDERICK ANDERSON.

REFERENCES CITED UNITED STATES Number' Name Date- 1,162,012 Armor et a1 Nov. 30, 1915 1,319,774 Kallajian Oct. A28, 1 919 2,260,703 Daly Oct. 28, 1941 FOREIGN PATENTS Y Number Country 4 Date

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1162012 *Nov 2, 1914Nov 30, 1915William Roy ArmorReceiver-supporting arm.
US1319774 *Dec 13, 1916Oct 28, 1919 Telephone-receiver hoi
US2260703 *Jul 27, 1940Oct 28, 1941James Daly ArthurTelephone receiver holder
SE56281C1 * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2598045 *Oct 5, 1949May 27, 1952Dictaphone CorpDictating machine transcribing apparatus with extension arm
US2657278 *Dec 22, 1949Oct 27, 1953Le Noir Chester WTelephone support and switch control mechanism
US2766330 *Apr 17, 1953Oct 9, 1956William OlsenTelephone hand set holder
US2770682 *Sep 30, 1953Nov 13, 1956Malone Charles JTelephone handset holder
US2835745 *Apr 7, 1955May 20, 1958Romano James VTelephone support
US2961498 *Feb 13, 1958Nov 22, 1960Snow Milton LTelephone switch control devices
US3200656 *May 22, 1963Aug 17, 1965Baskett Theodore NMounting apparatus for traveling, structural-surface-processing appliances
US3324254 *Nov 22, 1965Jun 6, 1967Shaw Henry WMicrophone holder and the like
US3393891 *Aug 2, 1966Jul 23, 1968United Carr IncAssembly license lamp and plate holder
US3793889 *Feb 7, 1973Feb 26, 1974Niskin SThermometer reversing apparatus
US4049927 *May 11, 1976Sep 20, 1977Leslie Joseph SuttonTelephone hand-set holding means
US5318257 *Sep 25, 1992Jun 7, 1994Fujitsu LimitedMechanism for supporting camera in image transmission apparatus
US6158793 *Jun 29, 1998Dec 12, 2000Castro; JoseConcealable support for automotive accessory
Classifications
U.S. Classification379/455, 379/454, 379/448
International ClassificationH04M1/04
Cooperative ClassificationH04M1/04
European ClassificationH04M1/04