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Publication numberUS2435976 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 17, 1948
Filing dateJul 21, 1945
Priority dateJul 21, 1945
Publication numberUS 2435976 A, US 2435976A, US-A-2435976, US2435976 A, US2435976A
InventorsEugene L Monagin
Original AssigneeEugene L Monagin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe sole with curved groundcontacting face
US 2435976 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

/ Feb. 17, 41948. I E. L. MONAGIN 2,435,976

SHOE SOLE WITH CURVED GROUND-CONTACTING FACE Filed July 2l, 1945 INVENTOR Eugfrle MoNa iN ='atentez'i Feb. 17, 194

SHOE soLE WITH ,ounvnni enormi).

QONIACTINGY FACE EnzenerL. Monagin, United States Navy; Uva-1de, Tex.

Application July 21, 1945, seriarNq. 606,463

(Clr 36-.8.5)` (Granted under the act of March 3, 1883;, as,

4. Claims.

This invention relates yto shoes and more particularly to a shoe having a substantially rigid arcuate support and. ground engaging member.

Objects of my invention are to provide a. device materially to reduce the fatigue fof walking; to provide a means vfor more evenly distributing the supported weight between the heel' and the ball of the foot while, walking; to relieve foot arch strain; 'to impart the rolling action of a wheel to walking; tojprovide a means for bringing ease andjnaturfalism to walking on an .articial leg; and to provide improved elements and arrangements thereof in a shoe ofthe 'character and for the purposes set forth.

In accomplishing these and other objects o f the present invention, I have provided improved details of structure, the preferred forms of which are illustrated in the vaccompanying drawing, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal vertical sectional view of a shoe embodying the features of the pres-` ent invention.

p Fig. 2 is a side'ele'vational view of Va modified form of'a device embodying the features of the present invention adapted to embrace a variety of shoes to adapt the `advantages of this invention to shoes of conventional jdsign.

Referring more in detail tolthe draw-ing:

I designates ari-arcuate base member ofa size and material to provide a'vsubstantialiy inflexf ible rocker foundation for the shoe.

-A point 2 on ythe base `l`member I 'contiguous to the ball oflthe wearer'slfoot, -is` vthe 4point 'of the tangential joiningof- `two portions of the base member having diier'ent radii ofcurvature. During the normal'movem'e'nts ofwalking, the leg is pivoted respectively at the hip and yat the knee. When pivoting the leg -from the hip, the weight of the wearer is -borneby the base member I between point 2 and `the rear endof the loasemembeny When'tlle` knee becomes the pivoting point, vthe weight is shifted Aforward of point 2, The radius of curvature of a wheel always beingthe dis-tance from '-the`pivot point, the axle, to the peripheryof the wheel, the base member I isu-vformed to haveia fore and aft radius of curvature lfrom the 'pointzfrearward approximating the length of: the -wearers leg and a radius of curvature forward of the vpoint 2 ap-v proximating the vdistance between `.the weareris knee and the ball offhis -foot' to impart the roll ing action of a wheel towalking.

A ground engaging member 3 is preferably provided of suitable materialomthe 'lower side of the -base Vmember `I ato protect the base membel' from Weer 111,14' 119 @F517 31S 3 Suitable f-Qa: portion for theshoe.

A lift 4, or wedge, is secured to the upper urface of the rearward of the base mem- Fastened to. they base member I, a short distance rearward of point 2.; is a shank 5 vof substantially rigid construction held :in spaced rela.- tion to the base member at its rearward'endf by being `connectedto .and overlying .the upper portion vof the lift ,4.` The shank .5 .preferably formed of metal serves :as an arch support in the shoe. VI-Iowever, the primaryarch supporting `fea-ture `of this device is in the fact .that

the weight is transferred from the heel .of the foot to the ball of the foot by the curved .surface of the base member, thus relieving .the arch of strain.

For the wearers comtort. an inner sole (i is Secured by a suitableadhesive lmeans to the upwardly exposed surface of the base memberand shank 5,.

'I designates aback stay and 8 acounterboth.

extended downwardly to fasten on .the lift 4 Yand abut the base meinberrfl. The back stay l and the Counter comprsea heelengagine and .positioning means for the shoe.

The sides 9 and-thetoe I0 of the upper yportionA 0f `the shoe extend .downwardly to fasten.

to the base mem-ber I.

A lacing flap -Il -andgtongue .portion I2 arei provided. e

The back Stay '1, the counter 8, the sides '9, the toe I mthelacing flap II and the `tongue por tion :I2 comprise la substantially conventional conventional manner ,of inserting the foot intov the foot receiving and positioning.means andlac-` iing .the vflaps I I,

In walking, `the rearward portionof the ground engaging member 3 is lrst to b ear 'the weight of the wearer. Instlgidingthe rst .partei Q.the

step is .usually made with .the legs straight; .all of the lpivoting of the leg `taking 1place Fat the hip.` The portion of the 4base lmember VI from point -2 rearwardhaving Va'g-radius of .curvature approximating the .length -Qf the :wear-@fs leg.

provides a .Convenient stelling, ;.Surface duringinth@ rStr-part of theater. {I'henortlon .of the' bete 3 member I rearward of the point 2 functions as the periphery of a wheel; the wearers leg, as a spoke of a wheel; and his hip, as a pivot point efrlcaciously to impart the rolling action of a wheel to walking.

As a stride progresses, the weight of the wearer of the shoe moves progressively forward on the foot. At approximately the time the weight reaches the ball of the foot the knee of the wearer starts to bend. During the completion of the stride the knee, not the hip, is the pivot point. This fact is advantageously utilized in the embodiment of this invention.

From point 2 forward, the base member I has a radius of curvature approximating the distance from the wearers knee to the ball of his.

foot. Similarly to the rst part of the stride its completion is accomplished by the portion of the base member I, forward of point 2, acting as the periphery of a wheel; the wearers leg and foot from his knee downward, as a spoke of a wheel; and his knee as a pivot point.

Mdijcation In Fig. 3, a modification of this invention is .provided to the end of making the advantages incident to the use of this shoe more generally available.

In this form of the invention a base member I3 of substantially inflexible material is provided.

A point I4 in the base member I3 is in subposed relation to the ball of the wearers foot and is the point of the tangential joining of two portions of the base member having dilerent radii of curvature.

From the point I4 rearward to the end of the base member I3, the radius of curvature of the said basevmember approximates the length of the wearers leg, as does the portion of the base member I rearward of the point 2 in Fig, 1.

The portion of the base member forward of the point I4 has a radius of curvature approximating the distance from the wearers knee to the ball of his foot, similarly to the radius of curvature of the base member forward of point 2 in Fig. 1.

A gr-ound engaging member I5fis fastened in conformity to the curvature of the downwardly disposed surface of the base member I3 preferably by suitable adhesive means.

lA transverse rib I6 is provided to engage in a bracing relationship the shoe on which the device is mounted to assist in positioning and maintain- `ing the device on the shoe in proper position.

A heel receiving portion I1 supports the heel of the shoe at a height and angle in keeping with the wearers predetermined comfort and convenience.

A plurality of openings I8 in the heel receiving portion I1 and the base member M, with counter sinking holes in the ground engaging member I5, comprise receptacles employed for the purpose of mounting the device on the shoe by means of screws of a length securely to engage the sole and heel of the shoe but of insucient length to pass through the said sole and heel.

In addition, adhesive means preferably are ernployed on the upper surfaces of the base member I3 and the heel receiving portion I1 to assist in fastening the device to the shoe.

So mounted, the device is used as described.

It is apparent therefore, that I have provided an improved shoe that materially reduces walking fatigue, that more evenly distributes the supandere 4 ported weight of the wearer between his heel and the ball of his foot while walking, and imparts the rolling action of a wheel to walking.

The embodiment of this invention is particularly well suited to use on an artificial leg. The rearward and forward rolling surfaces of the shoe provide an ease and naturalism to walking by means of an artificial leg heretofore not available.

It is further apparent that by striking the extreme forward portion of this Walking aid as an arc of a radiushaving a length extending from the ankle to the toe of the foot, this aid may also be employed to enhance the comfort of the wearer in dancing and other activities requiring bearing the wearers weight on the toes.

The chief advantage in this device is the transfer of the wearers weight from the heel to the ball of the foot through the aid rather than through the arch, thus alleviating possible strain on the wearers foot.

While I have shown but certain embodiments of my invention, it is susceptible to further modi cation without departing from the spirit of the invention. I do not wish, therefore, to be limited by the disclosures set forth, but only by the scope of the appended claims.

The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the Government of the United States of America for governmental purposes without the payment of any royalties thereon or therefor.

I claim:

1. A shoe comprising an arcuate base member having an upwardly curving rear portion described by a radius of curvature approximating the length of the wearers leg and an upwardly curving forward portion described by a radius of curvature approximating the distance between the wearers knee and the ball of his foot, a downwardly disposed ground engaging member secured to the arcuate base member, a lift secured to the upper surface of the said base member at its rear end to elevate the wearers heel a distance in keeping with his predetermined walking comfort, a shank secured to the upper surface of the lift and the basermember to provide support for the wearers arch, and a shoe upper portion having side portions secured to the base member. Y

2. A shoe comprising a substantially rigid arcuate base member having rearward and forward upwardly curved portions of radii of curvature approximating the length of the wearers' leg and the distance between his knee and the ball of his foot respectively, a lift secured to the rear part of the base member to elevate the heel of the shoe, a shank secured to the base member and the lift to provide arch support for the wearer,v and a foot receiving and positioning means sup ported by, and attached to, the base member, liftture approximating the distance between the` wearers knee. and the ball of his foot, a groundengaging member secured to the base member,

and a lift element secured to the upper surface, of the rear end of the base member to elevate the heel portion of the shoe.

4. A device attachable to a shoe comprising a substantially rigid arcuate base member having an upwardly curved rear portion of a radius of curvature approximating the length Iof the leg of a person wearing the shoe and an upwardly curved forward portion of a radius of 4curvature approximating the distance from his knee to the ball of his f-oot, a downwardly disposed ground engaging wear member, an upwardly directed rib to engage the heel of the shoe and assist in maintaining the base member in proper position, and a plurality of openings in the base member provided to receive means for attaching the base member to the shoe.

EUGENE L. MONAGIN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the s file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1360995 *Jul 17, 1918Dec 7, 1920Anderson Frederick DShoe attachment to facilitate walking
DE361342C *Oct 13, 1922Joseph LevequeSchuhwerk mit starrer Sohle und federnd beweglicher Innensandale
FR404932A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4030213 *Sep 30, 1976Jun 21, 1977Daswick Alexander CSporting shoe
US4213255 *Apr 20, 1978Jul 22, 1980Norbert J. OlberzSole for hiking boots and the like
US4241523 *Sep 25, 1978Dec 30, 1980Daswick Alexander CShoe sole structure
US4348821 *Jun 2, 1980Sep 14, 1982Daswick Alexander CShoe sole structure
US4372059 *Mar 4, 1981Feb 8, 1983Frank AmbroseSole body for shoes with upwardly deformable arch-supporting segment
USRE31173 *Aug 17, 1979Mar 15, 1983 Sporting shoe
WO1981003414A1 *May 18, 1981Dec 10, 1981A DaswickShoe sole structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/171, 36/30.00R
International ClassificationA43B13/14
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/146, A43B13/145, A43B13/143
European ClassificationA43B13/14W2, A43B13/14W4, A43B13/14W