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Publication numberUS2436904 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 2, 1948
Filing dateJul 19, 1945
Priority dateJul 19, 1945
Publication numberUS 2436904 A, US 2436904A, US-A-2436904, US2436904 A, US2436904A
InventorsFrederick M Shea
Original AssigneeBear Brand Hoslery Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knitting machine
US 2436904 A
Abstract  available in
Images(10)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. M. SHEA KNITTING MACHINE March 2, 1948.

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, IN V EN TOR.

Patented Mar. 2, 1948 KNITTING MACHINE Frederick M. Shea, Kankakee, Ill., assigner to Bear Brand Hosiery Co., Kankakee, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application July 19, 1945, Serial No. 605,983

(Cl. Gti-92) l 30 Claims.

This invention relates to an improved method and apparatus for knitting a stocking having a ribbed top and a body portion formed by plain ilat knitting but comprising terry loops in the heel. sole and toe portions, or any selected ones of those portions, all of which are knitted in one continuous process starting at the top.

It has heretofore been common commercial practice to provide knitted socks with cushion soles by forming terry loops in those portions but these socks have been formed on machines not capable of knitting a ribbed top and these cushion sole socks have therefore been finished by turning over the top edges of the socks and hemming them, by putting on elastic tops or by hand transferring separately knitted ribbed tops thereto, all of which methods have been either time-consuming, costly or otherwise unsatisfactory. A ribbed top is highly desirable on account of its form fitting appearance and its tendency to hold the sock up on the leg and it is advantageous, particularly when the socks are intended for military use, to extend the terry loops not only through the sole but also into the heel and toe portions but such socks, formed in a continuous knitting process, have not heretofore been produced for the trade.

A ribbed top sock top is most advantageously produced on a circular knitting machine having the usual cylinder needles and dial needles, but such a machine has not heretofore been well adapted for the production of terry loops in the body or foot portion of the sock because the presence of the dial interferes with the provision of adequate means for drawing out the yarn to form terry loops of satisfactory size. The usual sinkers move inwardly to such an extent during normal rib knitting that it is not possible to equip these sinkers with shoulders of adequate height to draw out the terry loops without causing interference thereof with the dial or preventing the degree of radial inward movement of the sinkers which is essential to rib knitting.

The present invention involves the discovery of a method of knitting, capable of being carried out on a circular knitting machine, according to which the circular knitting machine is provided, as a part of this invention, with a series of auxiliary sinkers each of which is mounted in the same slot with one of the usual sinkers and capable of relative movement with respect to the usual sinkers, these auxiliary sinkers being provided with high yarn drawing shoulders or arms over which the terry loops are drawn and which are located wholly outside of the dial, so that the usual sinkers move inwardly at the proper times and to the proper extent during the knitting of the ribbed top while the auxiliary sinkers remain in their outer inactive positions, after which the dial is elevated and the knitting of the body portion and the terry loop portions proceeds with the auxiliary sinkers being actuated independently of the actuation of the usual sinkers. By this arrangement the terry loops may be made of any desired length by selecting auxiliary sinkers of appropriate height, Without causing any interference with the dial and without affecting the loop forming and tensioning functions of the usual sinkers. In conjunction with these fea.- tures means are provided for causing the body yarn and the terry loop yarn to be automatically and independently engaged by the usual sinkers and the auxiliary sinkers, respectively, as the yarns are drawn from the source of supply. When knitting a plain portion of the sock, not having terry loops, both the body yarn and the terry yarn are preferably knitted in together as a single yarn, and at these times the auxiliary sinkers remain in their inactive positions.

In order to form terry loops in the heel and toe portions, as well as in the sole and in a ring toe portion, several forms of auxiliary sinkers are provided, differing from each other in the formation of the parts by which they are actuated, and special automatically operated cams are provided for engaging those parts at the proper times in the cycle of the machine so that a selected group of auxiliary sinkers is operated when a predetermined portion of the sock having terry loops is to be knitted. These and other objects and features of the invention will appear more fully hereinafter.

The nature of the invention will be understood from the following specification taken with the accompanying drawings in which one embodiment of the invention is illustrated. In the drawings,

Figure 1 shows a side elevation of a stocking knitted according to the present invention when it has been turned inside out, showing the ribbed top and plain body portion provided with high heel splice, heel, sole, ring toe and toe portions which are reinforced and cushioned by terry loops;

Fig. 2 shows an enlarged elevation of a portion of the knitted fabric embodied in the sock illustrated in Fig. 1, showing portions of the plain fabric and the terry loop fabric each formed by knitting two yarns together. one yarn bein! drawn out to i'orm the loops in the cushioned portion of the fabric:

Fig. 3 shows an enlarged end elevation of the heel portion oi the sock illustrated in Fig. l showing the arrangement of the stitches in the middle portion of the heel where the terry loop courses are overlapped;

Fig. 4 shows an enlarged side elevation of the upper portion of a circular knitting machine embodying the features of the present invention, looking toward the right-hand part oi the machine. with portions thereof broken away;

Fig. 5 shows an enlarged vertical section taken on the line 5 5 of Fig. 4:

Fig. 6 shows a side elevation oi' one of the cylinder needles embodied in the knitting machine shown in Figs. 4 and 5:

Fig. 7 shows a side elevation of one of the plain sinkers embodied in the machine shown in Figs. 4 and 5:

Fig. 8 shows a side elevation of one of the sawtooth sinkers embodied in the construction shown in Figs. 4 and 5:

Fig. 9 shows a diagrammatic plan view oi' the relative arrangement of the cylinder needles and the auxiliary sinkers which. according to the embodiment of the invention illustrated, are placed in the same slots with the plain and the sawtooth sinkersthis diagram illustrating the relative portions oi' the circumference of the cylinder and sinker ring which are occupied by the long butt and the short butt cylinder needles and by the different forms oi' auxiliary sinkers, respectively:

Flg. l0 shows a side elevation of the first of the four forms of auxiliary sinkers which are embodied in the machine of the present invention:

Fig. 11 shows a side elevation of the second form oi' auxiliary sinker;

Fig. l2 shows a side elevation of the third form of auxiliary sinker:

Fig. 13 shows a side elevation oi the fourth form oi auxiliary sinker;

Fig. 14 shows a radial section through an outer portion of the dial, illustrating one of the dial needles. one of the saw-tooth sinkers, and one o! the auxiliary sinkers in the relative positions which these parts of occupy during the knitting of the ribbed top portion of the sock;

Fig. 15 shows a sectional view similar to that of Fig. 14, illustrating the relative arrangements oi the parts during the knitting oi.' the body portion of the sock alter the dial has been elevated and the stitches have been transferred to the cylinder needles;

Fig. 16 shows an enlarged radial section through the outer portion of the dial;

Fig. 17 shows a horizontal section taken on the line i1-i1 of Fig. 5, illustrating the relative arrangement of the cylinder needles and the sinkers and showing the arrangement of two sinkers in each slot:

Fig. 18 shows in diagrammatic form a development of the cylinder cams by which the cylinder needles and their jacks are operated;

Fig. 19 is a horizontal section through the dial and dial knitting cams showing with respect to the dotted reference lines illustrated here and also in Fig. 18 the preferred relations of the dial knitting cams to the cylinder cams:

Fig. 20 is a horizontal section through the dial cams and the transfer cams showing by their positions with respect to the dotted reference lines shown here and also in Fig. 18 the preferred relation of the transfer cams to the cylinder cams:

Fig. 21 shows a. top plan view of the holder for the sinker operating cams showing the cams for operating the usual plain and saw-tooth sinkers and the special cams which have been provided according to the present invention for operating the auxiliary sinkers over which the terry loops are drawn:

Fig. 22 shows a side elevation of the parts illustrated in Fig. 21:

Fig. 23 shows a bottom plan view of one of the outthrow cams which are embodied in the apparatus shown in Fig. 21 for moving the plain sinkers and saw-tooth sinkers outwardly;

Fig. 24 is a vertical sectional view through the pattern drum, the sinker cam holder and other parts, illustrating in side elevation the means for automatically controlling the position of one of the cams by which the auxiliary sinkers are operated;

Fig. 25 is a sectional view similar to that of Fig. 24 but in a diierent location showing a side elevation of the apparatus for automatically controlling the position of another cam by which the auxiliary sinkers are operated;

Fig. 26 shows an enlarged development of a portion of the cylinder needles and the associated plain sinkers, saw-tooth sinkers and auxiliary sinkers showing the body yarn and the terry yarn passing to the needles and being drawn over the proper sinkers, this view showing the relative positions of the parts in the operation of the machine during circular knitting with the cylinder rotating continuously in one direction or during alternate half -cycles in reciprocatory knitting:

Fig. 27 is a development similar to that of Fig. 26, showing the relative positions of the parts with the body yarn and the terry yarn passing to the needles when the direction of movement of the cylinder has been reversed, as compared with that shown in Fig. 26. as. for example, during the knitting of the heel and toe portions by reciprocatory knitting; and

Fig. 28 is a perspective View of the special yarn guide which has been provided according to the present invention for maintaining a separation of the body yarn and the terry yarn as they pass to the needles so that the points of the auxiliary sinkers may enter between the two threads in ad- Vance of the knitting point.

In Fig. 1 of the accompanying drawings, there is illustrated a sock 32 knitted according to the present invention and comprising a welt 32a, a ribbed top 32h, a leg portion 32, an ankle p0rtion 32d, an instep 32B, a high heel splice 321, a heel portion 32g which includes a reinforced portion 32h where the terry loop courses are shown as being overlapped in the middle portion of the heel. a sole portion 32, a ring toe portion 321, and a toe portion 32k, the latter including the reinforced area 321 Where the terry loop courses are also shown as being overlapped in the middle part of the toe portion. These parts of the sock are knitted in a. continuous process in the order named and by the use of the present invention it yis possible to obtain terry loops of substantial length in the portions 32r to 321, inclusive, thus providing a substantial cushioning effect throughout these portions of the sock. If desired, an extra thread may be thrown into the knitting operation during the knitting of the heel, sole and toe portions or heavier threads may be substituted when knitting the heel and toe portions. It is the preferred practice to knit the body yarn and the terry yarn together throughout the sock so that the stitches are double and the yarns lie in close contact with each other throughout the plain knit portions of the sock and in the ribbed top while the terry yarn is drawn out to form the loops in those areas where the cushioning effect is desired.

In Fig. 2 of the drawings there is shown the stitch formation of a portion of the knitted fabric embodied in the sock illustrated in Fig. 1 with the stitches extended in both directions in order to illustrate `the relative positions of the stitches more clearly. In the plain knitted portion shown at the right and at the top of Fig. 2, the body yarn B and the terry yarn T are knitted together in close contact with each other to form loops 33 of the body yarn and loops 34 of the terry yarn, thus forming the inner wales 35 and the outer wales 36 which extend throughout the area of this plain knitted portion of the sock. In the part where the terry loops are formed, the terry yarn T is drawn out to form the terry loops 31 which may be of any desired length within a considerable range depending upon the height of the auxiliary sinkers which are employed during the knitting process. In this terry loop area of the sock, the body thread B is knitted as before, forming sinker loops 38 extending between the vertical wales o1' the sock.

The rear inner side of the heel portion 32B of the sock is illustrated in Fig. 3 where the terry loops 31 are shown as being more numerous in the substantially rectangular area 32h where the alternate terry loop courses overlap when knitting in opposite directions toward the sutures 39 at the side of the heel, as hereinafter more fully described.

Although the present invention may be embodied in other forms of knitting machines, it has been illustrated as applied to a circular knitting machine of the Scott and Williams type and, in particular, to the form zof dial and cylinder machine illustrated and described in United States Letters Patent No. 1,641,101, granted August 30, 1927, on an application of Robert W. Scott. As illustrated in the accompanying drawings, the machine in which the present invention is embodied comprises a frame 46 provided with legs, not shown, adapted to rest upon the il-oor, and having mounted therein a main driving shaft 4| on which is fixed a bevel gear 42 arranged to mesh with a bevel gear 43 through which rotary or oscillatory motion is imparted to the upright needle cylinder C having grooves in its outer face to receive the vertical cylinder needles n. A tube 44 extends downwardly from the bottom of the cylinder to receive the knitted article passing from the needles. By suitable driving mechanism, not shown, but which may have the form shown in United States Letters Patent to Robert W. Scott No. 1,152,850, dated September 7, 1915, the driving shaft 4l may be caused to have a. continuous rotation in one direction for the knitting of the ribbed top, leg, ankle vor instep portions of a stocking or a reciprocatory motion such as is employed during the knitting .of the heel and toe.

Above the cylinder C and concentric with the axis thereof. there is mounted a dial D which is provided with radial grooves having slidably mounted therein the dial needles d each of which comprises two complementary members a and b. The hub of the dial D is secured upon a vertical dial shaft 45, as shown in Fig. 5, and this dial shaft is iournaled in a bearing 46 which forms a part of a bracket 41 mounted upon the upper end of the frame 40. The vertically extending butts al and bl of the dial needle members engage an annular cam groove 48 formed in a dial cam cap member 48 which is fixed in stationary position on the bearing member 46, being surrounded by the latch ring 46 which is secured to the bracket 41.

The dial shaft 45 has a splined engagement with a bevel gear 50 seated upon the upper end of a bearing member 4'6 within a housing member 5| and this bevel gear meshes with a bevel pinion 52 xed on a horizontal shaft 53 which is journaled in bearings 54 carried by the bracket 41. The outer end of the shaft 53 carries a relatively fixed bevel gear 55 which is driven by a bevel pinion 56 secured to the upper end of a vertical shaft 51. This shaft is journaled in bearings 58 and its lower end has xed thereon a bevel pinion 59 arranged to be actuated by the bevel gear 66 secured on the previously mentioned driving shaft 4I. In this way, the main driving shaft is caused to effect the rotation of the dial D as well as the rotation or oscillation of the cylinder C.

The cylinder needles n have the form shown particularly in Figs. 5 and 6, each comprising a stem portion provided at its upper end with a hook nl. At their lower ends these needles have outwardly extending butts, one-half of the needles having long butts n3 and the other half having short butts n4, as shown in Fig. 9. Beneath certain of the needles in the slots or grooves oi the cylinder C there are mounted jacks i each having an outwardly extending cam operated butt jl. Alternate cylinder needles are without jacks and these needles are inactive during the knitting of the ribbed top but are brought into action at the commencement of the knitting of the body portion of the sock and at this time the stitches carried by the dial needles are transferred to them. The needles are held in their grooves by a plurality of annular contractile springs 62 which are located partially Within an annular groove in the cylinder.

On the upper end of the cylinder C and extending partially on the inner side thereof is an annular sinker guide 63 which is secured to the cylinder by screws 64 and which is provided with an annular series of radially extending equally spaced slots 63, shown in Figs. 5 and 17, in each of which there are slidably mounted two relatively movable sinkers including an auxiliary sinker W for drawing out terry loops and either a plain sinker P or a saw-tooth sinker S over which the stitches of the body yarn are drawn during the knitting operation. The plain and saw-tooth sinkers are placed in alternate slots 63a and there is an auxiliary sinker in each slot. The outer portions of all of the sinkers slide in slots 65EL formed in the sinker ring 65 which is secured to the outer side of the cylinder C as shown in Fig. 5. The slots in the ring 65 align with those in the sinker guide 63 and each slot 65a contains two sinkers. A cylinder needle n is mounted to pass vertically between two pairs of sinkers mounted in adjacent slots 63a as shown in Fig. 17. All of the sinkers are normally moved to their inner positions by an annular contractile coil spring 66 which engages vertically extending shoulders thereof. An annular sinker cam cap 61 is rotatably engaged by the outer portion of the sinker ring upon which it is supported and the cams carried by this cap serve to effect radial movementl of the sinkers at the proper times through engagement with the upwardly extending butts thereof.

The plain sinkers P have the form shown particularly in Fig. '1, each comprising an upwardly extending butt PI and an upper inwardly extending arm P2 having on its upper side a yarn supporting surface P3. The arm P2 rises at its outer end to a horizontal shoulder P above which is a hook P6. Each of these sinkers P has a lower shorter horizontal arm P1 which is parallel to and spaced from the arm P2. The outer portion of the sinker is recessed forwardly of the butt PI as shown at P8 to receive the wall of the annular cam groove or slot in the under side of the cam cap and this recess is terminated at its inner margin by a rounded notch P9 adapted to be engaged by the previously mentioned contractile spring 66.

The saw-tooth sinkers S are of the form shown in Fig, 8 and each comprises a vertically extending butt SI, located at its outer end, and an inwardly extending upper arm S2 having formed on the upper inner margin thereof a series of teeth S3 which are adapted to engage and tension the fabric during the knitting process. Outwardly from the teeth S3 each sinker S has a horizontal surface S4 over which the loops of yarn are drawn during the knitting operation and at the outer margin of this surface there is an inwardly extending overhanging hook S6. An arm S1 extends horizontally beneath and parallel to the arm S2 but is somewhat shorter. Each sinker S is recessed forwardly of its butt SI, as shown at S8, to receive the wall of the annular slot in the cam cap member and at the inner margin of this recess a notch S9 is formed for engagement by the anular contractile spring 66. The spring 66 normally forces the sinkers P and S inwardly until their shorter arms P1 and S1, respectively, engage the inner margin of an annular groove |53b formed in the guide ring 63.

The auxiliary sinkers W, which serve merely as terry loop drawing members without any fabric tensioning function, are of four different specific forms, WI, W2, W3 and W4, shown particularly in Figs. l0, 1l, 12 and 13, respectively. Each of these sinkers has a butt wi and a forwardly extending lower arm w1 which is identical in form and extent with the sinker arms P1 and S1 described above, being adapted to enter the groove G3i in the guide ring to limit the inward movement of the sinkers. Each of the auxiliary sinkers W is provided with a relatively high yarn drawing surface wd which terminates at its inner margin in an upwardly and inwardly inclined projection or neb wB. The terry loops are adapted to be drawn over the surfaces wil and the projections ws are adapted to retain these loops on these sinkers until they are intentionally removed therefrom. Each of the sinkers W is provided in the outer part thereof with a recess w8 adapted to receive the wall of the annular groove formed in the sinker cam cap 61. At the inner margin of the recess w8, each of the sinkers W is provided with a notch wg for engagement by the previously described contractile coil spring 66. The distance c between the inner margin of the recess w! in each of the sinkers W and the forward shoulder on the butt wi on that sinker, as shown in Fig. 10, is the same for all of the sinkers WI, W2, W3 and W4 and this distance is somewhat greater than the corresponding distance ci on the slnkers P and S, shown in Figs. '1 and 8, respectively, so that when the sinkers P and S have been moved inwardly to the maximum extent by the action of the spring 6B, there will be a clearance between the spring and the inner margins of the recesses w! which will allow relative radial outward movement of the sinkers W before they engage the spring 6B. At this time, there will also be a clearance between the inner shoulders of the sinker butts wl and the surface of the inner wall of the cam groove in the under side of the cam cap member 61, so that the auxiliary sinkers W are capable of relative radial inward movement with respect to the sinkers P and S for the purpose hereinafter pointed out.

The yarn measuring surfaces wl on each of the auxiliary sinkers of the forms WI, W2, W3 and W4 are of the same height and substantially higher than the corresponding yarn measuring surfaces of the sinkers P and S and when the sinkers W are in their normal positions the projections or horns w8 of these sinkers lie outside of the dia] D even when the dial is in its lower knitting position as shown in Fig. 14. When the dial is elevated and the sinkers P, S and W move inwardly during the knitting of the plain body portions and the terry loop portions of the sock, the auxiliary sinkers W are capable of movement inwardly to the necessary extent to form the terry loops.

Each of the auxiliary sinkers W has an outer vertical cam engaging surface wid by which it is actuated through the agency of the special sinker operating cams hereinafter described and each of these sinkers W has three separate steps I, 2 and 3 of the cam engaging surface wiii which are engageable by a cam in different positions, as indicated in Figs. 10 to 13, inclusive. In the form of auxiliary sinker WI, all of the cam engaging steps I, 2 and 3 are located in a continuous vertical plane, as shown in Fig. 10. In the form W2, shown in Fig. 11, the upper step I is offset inwardly so that a cam in that position will not actuate the sinker, while it will be actuated by cams in either of the positions 2 or 3. In the form of sinker W3, shown in Fig. l2, the cam engaging surfaces I and 3 are in line but the position 2 is offset inwardly to form a notch so that this form of sinker will not be operated by a cam in the No. 2 position. In the form WI, shown in Fig. 13, both the positions I and 2 are notched out so that they will not be engaged by cams in either of those positions while the step 3 remains for actuation by cams in that position. The reason for this different formation of the different forms of auxiliary sinkers is that certain of these auxiliary sinkers are made active during the knitting of different portions of the sock such as the high heel splice, heel, sole, ring toe and toe portions and auxiliary sinkers of a particular form are employed in the slots which extend through different arcs of the sinker guide 65, as shown in Fig. 9.

As there illustrated, the auxiliary sinkers WI are located on the side of the machine where the short butt cylinder needles are located and midway between the ends of the series of short butt cylinder needles. The sinkers of the forms W2 and Wil are located in two series on opposite sides of the series of sinkers WI and the end of each of these series overlaps to some extent the positions of the series of long butt cylinder needles. The auxiliary sinkers W4 extend throughout the remainder of the arc between the ends of the two series of auxiliary sinkers W2 and W3 and opposite to the long butt cylinder needles.

In the embodiment illustrated, the sinkers Wl occupy approximately 15 per cent of the circumference of the sinker guide while the sinkers W2 and W3 each occupy about 20 per cent of the circumference and the remainder of approximately 45 per cent is occupied by the sinkers W4. More specifically. in a circular knitting machine having |38 auxiliary sinkers W, there are 20 sinkers WI, 21 sinkers W2, 21 sinkers W3, and 82 sinkers W4.

During the knitting of the heel and toe, the auxiliary sinkers WI and W3 are moved inwardly to their loop forming positions by cams engaging them on the first steps thereof. When a cam is in a position to engage the second step of the auxiliary sinkers, the sinkers WI and W2 are moved inwardly to their loop forming positions while the sinkers W3 and W4 remain in their normal positions due to the fact that the cam engages the notches at the second position on these sinkers, this arrangement of the auxiliary sinkers being employed during the knitting of the high splice on the heel and during the knitting of the sole portion. When the actuating cam is in the third position, all of the sinkers are moved inwardly to their loop forming positions and this is the condition which exists when knitting the ring toe. During the knitting of the heel and toe portions, the cylinder is automatically reversed in its direction of rotation in the usual manner and in order to overcome any tendency of these reverse movements to bend or distort the inner portions of the plain sinkers P and the saw-tooth sinkers S, the auxiliary sinkers W2, W3 and W4 are preferably provided with upper forwardly extending arms w2 which are of approximately the same shape and length as but of slightly less height than the corresponding arms P2 and S2 of the sinkers located in the same slots with them so that they thus support the arms P2 and S2 laterally.

As shown particularly in Figs. 5 and 16, the dial D has a plurality of equally-spaced radially-extending grooves 12 in its upper side to receive the dial needles d, there being half as many of these grooves as there are cylinder needles around the cylinder. The dial D is also provided with a peripheral groove 13 which defines a narrow projecting annular verge formed as a toothed member having its upper surface coincident with the lower surfaces of the needles d. On the under side of the dial D around its outer edge there are provided a series of fins 15 each of which has an outer surface 151i sloping upwardly and outwardly to the verge 14. These fins are so distributed around the margin of the dial that one of them is located above each of the plain sinkers P and the dial grooves 12 are located above those cylinder needles which are inactive during the rib knitting.

The dial needles which are illustrated particularly in Figs. 5, 14 and 15 are of the two-part type shown in said Scott Letters Patent No. 1,641,101, each comprising a loop drawing or hooked member a and a point member b. Each hook member a has a butt al extending upwardly from the inner portion thereof and with a shank a2 having a hook a3 at its forward end. The point member b has an upwardly extending butt bl and is provided at its outer end with a spring tail portion b2 which is bowed laterally and which slides in a groove a5 formed in the hook member, this spring tail portion providing fricticnal resistance for holding the two parts of each needle together and holding them in a groove of the dial. Each point member b is further provided at its inner end with a loop penetrating and carrying point b5 and with an outwardly directed point b. These dial needles are operated ln the usual manner by cams mounted on or within the stationary cam cap 48 which engages their butts al and bl during the rotation of the dial, as more fully described in said Scott Letters Patent No. 1,641,101. The dial needles are moved vertically into and out of knitting positions by the movement of the dial D and for this purpose the dial spindle 45 has secured to its upper end an arm or plate 19 having mounted in the end thereof an adjustable stud adapted to be engaged by one end of the leve;` 8| shown in Figs. 4 and 5 and pivoted at 82 on the gear housing 5|. 'Ihe free end of this lever is engaged by a bracket 83 fixed on the upper end of a rod 84 having a pivotal connection at an intermediate point with a. link 85 which has its other end pivoted on the stationary latch ring pivot post 86. The lower end of the rod 84 is pivotally connected to a rocker lever, not shown, which is adapted to be actuated at the proper times by a. cam xed on the cam shaft 9|, shown in Fig. 4. Upon rotation of this cam in the direction of the arrow 92, the arm B4 is actuated to effect vertical movement of the dial through the foregoing connections.

The cylinder C is also capable of automatic vertical movement with respect to the cual D by means of a power actuated connection comprising a, lever 95, shown in Fig. 4, which is pivoted on the stationary stud 9B and which has an intermediate arm contacting with a lug 91 secured to the side of the tube 44 upon which the bottom bearing of the cylinder C rests. The lower end of this lever 95 carries a pin 88 which is actuated by cams on the surface of the pattern drum |00 by which various operations of the machine are eiected and controlled in the usual manner. The pattern drum is adapted to be rotated in the direction of the arrow |0| by driving connections extending from the cam shaft 8| and including a gear |02 iixed on the cam shaft. a gear |03 fixed on an intermediate shaft |04, and a gear |05 fixed on the shaft |06 upon which the pattern drum is secured. The means f or driving the cam shaft 8| and for controlling the actuation of the pattern drum through the agency of the pattern chain (not shown) may be substantially as disclosed in the aforesaid Scott Letters Patent No. 1,152,850.

The machine comprises the usual yarn feeding means including the usual lingers from which the yarn passes to the needles of the machine. As a part of the present invention there ls provided a guide block |08, shown in Fig. 28, which is mounted upon the guard ring 49 and which is provided with a channel IllilEl through which the body yarn B and terry loop yarn Tpass. This guide block is provided at its inner margin with a transverse ledge Illh having formed therein a notch ||I8 engaged by the body yarn B. The terry loop yarn T passes over the ledge |00b at the side of the channel, and in this way. the two yarns are spaced apart so that the nebs or projections 1116 of the auxiliary sinkers W may enter between the two yarns as they pass to the needles in the manner shown in Figs. 26 and 2'1, it being understood that the auxiliary sinkers are moved inwardly in advance of the knitting point so that the terry loops are partially formed before the loops of the body yarn are drawn over the sinkers P and S.

Having described the principal parts of the machine, reference will now be made to the means for actuating the needles and the sinkers during the rotary motions of the cylinder C and the dial D and bringing about their proper sequential operation. Referring to Fig. 18, which shows in developed form the cams for operating the cylinder needles, it will be observed that the cylinder needles are arranged to be controlled and actuated by a series of cams as they travel in the direction indicated by the arrow |I4. These cams include the operating cams ||5, IIB, II1, Ila and |20, a jack actuating cam |2|, the knitting cams |22, |23 and |24, the stationary cams |25 and |21 and the switch cam |26. The stationary cam |2| engages the butts 1'| of the jacks j and causes them to elevate the corresponding cylinder needles to the active position so that they travel along the dotted line path indicated at |28. The iackless needles which are inactive during the knitting of the welt and the ribbed top pass along the path |29 over the cams ||5 and |21 and are directed downwardly by the cam I|5 so that their butts pass beneath the knitting cams and are then carried out over the stationary cam and are returned to their initial positions. After the make-up courses have been laid on the cylinder and dial needles, the dial is elevated and the alternate cylinder needles pass along the path |26 over the cam |22 and under the cams |23 and |24 to the knitting position indicated by the link k from which they pass over the cam |25 and are returned to their initial positions. After the welt has been knitted, the dial is lowered and the dial needles are brought into operation to cooperate with the active cylinder needles in knitting the ribbed top which in the embodiment here illustrated would have a 1 x 1 pattern assuming that there are as many dial needles as there are active cylinder needles at this stage of the knitting process.

When the ribbed top has been completed, the stitches carried by the dial needles are automatically transferred in the usual manner to the previously inactive Jackless cylinder needles and those previously inactive cylinder needles are rendered active by the withdrawal of the cam IIB so that these cylinder needles then pass upwardly over the knitting cam |22 as indicated by the dotted line path |30. The body portion of the sock is then knitted with the dial elevated and all of the cylinder needles active and, during this time, at the proper stages of the knitting operation, the auxiliary sinkers W heretofore described are rendered active so that the high heel splice, the heel portion, the sole portion, the ring toe portion and the toe portion are provided on their inner sides with long terry loops as the knitting is carried on in a continuous process. During the knitting of the heel and toe portions, the cylinder C is reciprocated in the usual manner by mechanism, not shown, which may have the form disclosed in said Scott Letters Patent No. 1,152,850 and the long butt cylinder needles are thrown out of action by the switch cam |26 so that the heel and toe portions are knitted by the reciprocatory motions of the cylinder. In conjunction with these operations, the dial D is automatically moved to its lower position during the make-up, is raised for the knitting of the welt, is again lowered for the knitting of the ribbed top, and is held in an elevated position during the knitting of the body portion through the actuation of the cam controlled mechanism heretofore referred to.

The operation of the dial needles d in rib knitting is Well understood in the art, being disclosed in said Scott Letters Patent No. 1,641,101. The needles are operated by cams, shown in Figs. 19 and 20, which are carried within the annular groove 48 having annular vertical marginal surfaces which define cams and |36. The knitting cams located in the groove 48* may comprise a cam |31 for advancing the hooked part a of the dial needles, a cam |38 for advancing the point part b of these needles, and a cam |30 which operates on both the hooked member a and the point member b of the dial needles. The dial cams also include a fixed separator cam |40 and transfer cams |4| and |42, shown in Fig. 20, for giving the parts the necessary transfer movements when the stitches are transferred to the cylinder needles. The movable dial needle operating cams are reciprocated vertically through openings in the dial cam cap by operating mechanism actuated by thrust rods H2 extending to the pattern drum |00 in the usual manner. By the operation of these cams, the parts of the dial needles are moved radially of the dial and are given the necessary relative movements during the knitting of the ribbed top, during which time the dial occupies its lower position as shown in Fig. 14, the stitches being carried partly by the dial needles and partly by the cylinder needles with the loop carrying surfaces w4 and projections 106 of the auxiliary sinkers occupying positions on the outside of the dial. When the knitting of the ribbed top has been completed and the stitches have been transferred to the cylinder needles, the dial is elevated with respect to the sinkers and the cylinder needles, as shown in Fig. 15, and the knitting of the body portion of the sock then proceeds with the dial in its inactive position.

The sinkers P and S are actuated by cams carried by the sinker cam cap 61 shown particularly in Figs. 5, 21 and 22. This cap is provided on its under side with a concentric groove 61 which is partially entered by the various sinker operating cams which include inthrow cams |50, |5| and |52, and a withdrawing cam |53, shown particularly in Figs. 21 and 23, all of which are mounted on the cam cap 61 for movement with respect to the groove 61*1 which is engaged by the butts PI and SI oi the sinkers, as heretofore described. The construction and operation of the mechanism for actuating these sinkers is as set forth in said Scott Letters Patent No. 1,641,101. The cam |53 is, however, somewhat modified as cornpared with the form previously employed in this location inasmuch as its under side is milled oil' and reduced in thickness toward the ends of the cam from two inclined converging shoulders |63a to permit the butts w| of the auxiliary sinkers W to pass under these portions of the cam of reduced thickness at proper times in the operation of the machine, as hereinafter explained. The cam |53 is pivoted at |54 on the sinker cap and has an actuating pin |55 extending through a slot for actuation by a lever |51 which is pivoted on the upper face of the sinker cam cap at |56 and has a tail piece |51a acted upon by one arm of a bell crank lever |60 plvoted at IBI on the sinker cam cap and adapted to be actuated by a rod |62 having connections whereby it is operated from the pattern drum |00 through one of the thrust bars ||2, The sinker cam cap 61 is provided with a pair oi projecting lugs 61h engaged by adjustable studs |63 and this cam cap is adapted to have a limited oscillatory movement 13 in the usual manner to the extent permitted by the movement of the lugs 6lb with respect to an intermediate stop member. The construction and operation of these parts is as usual in this type of machine.

The auxiliary sinkers W are operated by two cams |65 and |66 through connections extending to the pattern drum |00, as shown in Figs. 21, 22, 24 and 25. The cam |65 is in the form of an arcuate spring steel plate having one end thereof rigidly secured to the upper face of the sinker cam cap member 61 by means of screws |61. The free end of this cam |65 is provided with a sinker operating projection |65* having an arcuate inner surface which projects beyond the inner periphery of the cam cap 61 and which is adapted to force the auxiliary sinkers W inwardly to receive and form the terry loops at a proper place in advance of the knitting point. The free end of the cam |65 and its projection |65a are adapted to occupy any one of four vertical positions including an upper inactive position and three lower active positions corresponding to the positions 2 and 3 which have previously been described in connection with the auxiliary sinkers shown in Figs. 10 to 13, inclusive. The projection |65El normally assumes by its own resilience its upper inactive position wherein it does not engage or operate any of the auxiliary sinkers W. The cam |65 is permitted to assume one of its three lower positions when an arm |66 carried by a thrust rod |10, and provided with an adjustable stud |69 engaging the cam, is properly operated by one of the cams |1|, |1| and |1|b fixed on the rotating pattern drum |00. 'I'he thrust bar |10 moves in guides |14 and is normally carried downwardly by a coil spring |12 having suflicient strength to overcome the resilience of the cam |65 so that it holds the free end of the cam |65 down on the cam cap 61 with the lower end of the thrust bar |10 in proximity to the cylindrical surface of the pattern drum |00. The cam |65 then engages the auxiliary sinkers WI, W2, W3 and W4 on the portions thereof which are designated by the numeral 3 in Figs. 10, 11, 12 and 13, this being the position of the cam during the knitting of the ring toe when terry loops are formed throughout the circumference of the toe portion of the sock. When the high splice on the heel and the sole portion of the sock are being knitted, the thrust bar |10 is engaged by another cam l1|EL which permits the arm |68 carried at the top of the thrust bar to occupy an intermediate position so that the cam |65 rises by its own resilience and engages the surfaces of the sinkers WI and W2 in the positions designated as the second positions in Figs. 10 and l1. When the heel and toe portions are being knitted. the thrust bar |10 is engaged by a cam I1|b on the drum |00 so that the cam |65 is permitted to rise further to a position where it operates the sinkers Wl and W3.

The cam |65 is adapted to function in controlling the movements of the auxiliary sinkers during the rotation of the cylinder in the normal direction in which it moves during the knitting of the leg portion, for example, of the sock. During the knitting of the portions of the sock which require a reciprocatory movement of the cylinder and its needles, the cam |65 continues to function in controlling the movements of the auxiliary sinkers W when the cylinder is running in one direction and the other cam |66 operates to control the movements of the auxiliary sinkers when the cylinder is running in the other direction.

This auxiliary cam is controlled in its movements by the actuating mechanism illustrated in Fig. 25 which comprises a bell crank lever |15 Divoted at |16 on the free portion of the cam |66 and having an arm |15 provided with a depending lug which bears upon the upper surface of that part of the cam |65 which lies always in contact with the cam cap 61. The upwardly extending arm |15'J of the bell crank lever is pivotally connected to a rod |11 which slidably engages an aperture in the upwardly extending arm |16EL of another bell crank lever |16 having a fixed pivot |19. A block is secured on the rod |11 by a set screw IBI so that movement of the arm |16 toward the right, as viewed in Fig. 25, will cause the arm |15a of the bell crank lever |15 to bear upon the cam |65 and to elevate the cam |66. The bell crank lever |18 has another arm |16b which is pivoted to the upper end of another thrust bar |62 adapted to bear upon the surface of the pattern drum |00. A coil spring |83 connected to the bar |82 and to a fixed member |64 normally acts to hold the cam |66 in its uppermost position wherein it is above the plane of the upper surfaces oi all of the auxiliary sinkers W and is out of action. When the bar |62 rides over a cam |65 fixed on the pattern drum, the spring |63 is extended and the bell crank lever |18 is rocked about its pivot so that the rod |11 is permitted to move toward the left, as viewed in Fig. 25, thus allowing the cam |66 to move downwardly, due to its own resilience, to its lower position wherein it engages the second operating steps of the sinkers WI and W2, this being the position which the cam occupies during the knitting of the heel and toe.

In the operation of the knitting machine which has been described above, the make-up courses are i-lrst laid upon the dial and cylinder needles in the usual manner, using one-half of the cylinder needles, and the dial is then raised and the cylinder needles which have previously been in action are operated to knit the welt, at the conclusion of which operation the dial is again lowered and the aforesaid cylinder needles, which are those Without jacks, are operated to knit the rib top, both the body yarn B and the terry yarn T being knitted into the rib top as a single yarn, the auxiliary sinkers W being then inactive. If the top is a 1 x 1 pattern top. there are as many dial needles then active as there are cylinder needles. At the conclusion of the knitting of the ribbed top, the stitches carried by the dial needles are transferred to the previously inactive jackless cylinder needles which then operate along with all of the other cylinder needles, with the dial elevatedI to knit the leg portion 32c of the sock, the auxiliary sinkers remaining inactive so that the two yarns are knitted together as a single yarn.

When the knitting has proceeded to the point where the high heel splice 32l begins, the cam |65 is automatically moved from its zero or inactive position to its No. 2 position wherein it engages the auxiliary sinkers WI and W2 on their No. 2 positions as shown in Figs. 10 and l1, so that these auxiliary sinkers become active during those portions of each course which correspond to the arcs through which these sinkers extend, as shown in Fig. 9. The result is that during a part of each cylinder revolution represented by this arc, these auxiliary sinkers Wi and W2 are active and are moved inwardly by the cam |65 in advance of the knitting point so that the terry yarn T is looped over these sinkers as shown in Fig. 26. As there illustrated.. the terry yarn T is taken by the needles and loops are formed on the high auxiliary sinkers having the horns or nebs w6 which enter between the two yarns in advance of the point where the body yarn B is looped over the sinkers P and S. The two yarns are maintained in separation as they pass to the needles by the yarn guide ID3 and terry loops of substantial length are formed without interfering with the normal operation oi the plain sinkers P and the saw-tooth sinkers B which operate in the usual manner to form the body loops and to tension the fabric as the knitting proceeds. At this stage the auxiliary sinkers are inactive during more than one-half of each revolution and during this part of the revolution the front of the ankle portion 32d of the sock is formed by plain knitting with both yarns knitted together in body loops.

At the conclusion of the knitting of the ankle portion and the high heel splice, the knitting of the heel portion 32B is started and a reciprocatory motion is imparted to the cylinder and both of the cams |65 and |66 are activated, the cam |66 being in its upper position to operate the sinkers WI and W3 while the cam |66 is in its lower position to operate sinkers WI and W2'. At the same time the switch cam |26 operates to throw the long butt cylinder needles out of action. The consecutive courses are then knitted by alternate movements of the cylinder in opposite directions and the terry loops are formed in the manners shown in Figs. 26 and 27, the arrangement in Fig. 27 being that which exists when the cam |36 is active during the reverse rotation of the cylinder, at which time the direction of the yarns passing to the cylinder is reversed although the action and function of the auxiliary sinkers W remains the same. During this knitting of the heel portion 328 (and again when knitting the toe portion 32k), the terry loop courses may be begun along lines |80 some distance away from the sutures 39 and alternate terry loop courses are run in opposite directions from these lines |96 to the opposite sutures. If preferred, the terry loop courses may be run from a single intermediate line in opposite directions to the sutures without any overlap.

After knitting the heel portion 32, the cam |66 is thrown out of action and the cam |65 is returned to its middle position where it operates during a part of each revolution to actuatc the auxiliary sinkers Wi and W2 to knit the sole portion 32x while, during the remainder of each revolution, both yarns are knitted together in the plain knitted top 32 of the foot portion.

If desired, an extra yarn finger may be dropped and an extra yarn or a heavier yarn knitted in during the formation of the high splice, the heel, the sole portion and the toe portions for forming the terry loops.

When the sole portion has been completed. the cam |65 is automatically moved to its bottom position Where it engages the third step of the auxiliary sinkers and causes all of the sinkers WI, W2, W3 and W4 to be active as terry loops are formed throughout the ring toe portion 32|. When that portion has been finished the cam |65 is returned to its No. l position and the cam |66 is moved to its lower position while imparting a reciprocatory motion to the cylinder which then continues during the knitting of the toe portion 321, with the long butt cylinder needles out of action. As in the knitting of the heel, the

terry loops may be started some distance away l5 from one suture and knitted to the opposite suture when going in one direction and, on the next course, the terry loops are started some distance away from the last suture and continued to the first mentioned suture, thus forming terry loops in alternate courses except in the middle of the toe portion Where the starting portions of the terry loop courses overlap.

During the above-described operation of the auxiliary sinkers W, the short butts wl on these sinkers are permitted to pass under the end portions of the cam |53 through the openings formed by cutting away the bottom portions of the cam which are located toward the ends thereof from the lines |53 shown in Fig. 23. The auxiliary sinkers are thus permitted to move inwardly until their horns or nebs 106 enter under the terry yarn passing to the needles even though the cams |53 is then in position to hold the sinkers P and S in their outer positions.

The clearances between the notches w3 of the auxiliary sinkers W and the spring 66 permits the auxiliary sinkers W to move outwardly so that they do not interfere with the stitches during the knitting of the ribbed top or during the transfer of the dial stitches to the cylinder needles. The clearances between the butts wl and the wall of the groove 6la in the cam cap which have heretofore been referred to insure a full throw of the plain and saw-tooth sinkers during plain knitting without danger of moving the auxiliary sinkers W.

Although one example of the improved method of knitting and one embodiment of the improved knitting machine have been shown and described by way of illustration, it will be understood that both the method and the apparatus may be modified in various ways without departing from the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

l. In a circular knitting machine, a series of cylinder needles, a series of dial needles, a series of sinkers arranged in operative relation to said cylinder needles, a series of auxiliary sinkers, means for operating some of said needles and said iirst named sinkers to knit a ribbed top with said auxiliary sinkers inactive, means for rendering said dial needles inactive, and means for then operating said cylinder needles and both series of sinkers to knit a body portion having terry loops.

2. In a circular knitting machine, a series of cylinder needles, a dial, a series of dial needles carried by said dial, a series of sinkers over which body loops are adapted to be drawn, a second series of sinkers over which terry loops are adapted to be drawn, means for operating needles of both series and sinkers of said first `series to knit ribbed fabric, and means for operating needles of said first series and sinkers of both series to knit fabric having terry loops.

3. In a circular knitting machine, an annular series of reciprocatory needles, a second annular series of needles mounted for reciprocation transversely to the needles of said first series, a plurality of sinkers arranged to cooperate with said needles, means for operating needles of both series and some of said sinkers to knit ribbed fabric, and means for operating all of said needles of one series and all of said sinkers to knit terry loop fabric.

4. In a circular knitting machine, an annular series of reciprocatory needles, a second annular series of needles mounted for reciprocation transversely to the needles of said first series. a plurality of sinkers arranged to cooperate with said needles, means for operating needles of both series and some of said sinkers to knit ribbed fabric, means for then transferring the stitches from the active needles of one series to needles of the other series, and means for then operating all of said sinkers and needles of said other series to knit terry loop fabric.

5. In a circular knitting machine, an annular series of reciprocatory needles, a second annular series of needles mounted for reciprocatlon transversely to the needles of said first series, a plurality of sinkers arranged to cooperate with said needles, means for operating needles of both series and some of said sinkers to knit ribbed fabric, means for then transferring the stitches from the active needles of one series to needles of the other series, means for then operating some of said sinkers and needles of said other `series to knit plain fabric. and means for then operating all of said sinkers and needles of said other series to knit terry loop fabric.

6. In a circular knitting machine, an annular series of reciprocatory needles, a second annular series of needles mounted for reciprocation transversely to the needles of said first series, a series of sinkers adapted to cooperate with said needles, a second series of sinkers mounted for relative movement with respect to said first named sinkers, means for operating needles of both series and sinkers of said first series to knit ribbed fabric, means for then causing all of the stitches to be carried by needles of said first series, and means for then operating said stitch carrying needles of said first series and sinkers of both series to knit terry loop fabric.

7. In a. circular knitting machine, an annular series of reciprocatory needles, a. second annular series of needles mounted for reciprocation transversely to the needles of said first series, a series of sinkers adapted to cooperate with said needles, a second series of sinkers mounted for relative movement with respect to said first named sinkers, means for operating needles of both series and sinkers of said first series to knit ribbed fabric, means for then causing all of the stitches to be carried by needles of said first series, means for then operating said stitch carrying needles of said first series and said sinkers of said rst series in plain knitting, and means for then operating needles of said first series and sinkers of both series in knitting terry loop fabric.

8. In a circular knitting machine, an annular series of reoiprocatcry needles, a second annular series of needles mounted for reciprocation transversely to the needles of said first series, a series of sinkers adapted to cooperate with said needles, a second series of sinkers mounted for relative movement with respect to said first named sinkers, means for operating needles of both series and sinkers of said first series to knit`ribbed fabric, means for then causing all of the stitches to be carried by needles of said nrst series, means for operating needles of said first series and sinkers of said first series in circular knitting of plain fabric, and means for then operating needles of said rst series and sinkers of both series inreciprocatory knitting of terry loop fabric.

9. In a circular knitting machine adapted to knit a. body yarn and a terry loop yarn, a circular series of needles, a series of sinkers located in proximity to said needles for drawing loops of body yarn, a second series of sinkers each mounted alongside one of said rst named sinkers for drawing loops of terry yarn, means for operating said needles, and means for operating said sinkers and effecting relative movement of said sinkers in one series with respect to those of the other series.

l0. In a circular knitting machine adapted to knit a body yarn and a terry loop yarn, a cir cular series of needles, a series of sinkers located in proximity to said needles for drawing loops of body yarn, a second series of sinkers each mounted alongside one of said first named sinkers for drawing loops of terry yarn, means for operating said needles, and means for eiecting relative movement of said sinkers of one series with respect to the sinkers of the other series in a direction radial of the needle circle.

11. In a circular knitting machine adapted to knit a body yarn and a terry loop yarn, a circularseries of needles, a series of sinkers located in proximity to said needles and having surfaces extending transversely to said needles over which surfaces loops of body yarn are drawn by said needles, a second series of sinkers each located alongside one of said first named sinkers and each having a surface at a higher elevation than said first named surfaces over which loops of said terry yarn are drawn, and means for operating said needles and said sinkers.

12. In a circular knitting machine adapted to knit a body yarn and a terry loop yarn, a circular series of needles, a series of sinkers located in proximity to said needles and having surfaces extending transversely to said needles over which surfaces loops of body yarn are drawn by said needles, a second series of sinkers each located alongside one of said rst named sinkers and each having a surface at a higher elevation than said rst named surfaces over which loops of said terry yarn are drawn, means for operating said needles, and means for actuating said sinkers and effecting relative movement radially of the needle circle of the sinkers of one series with respect to the needles of the other series.

13. In a circular knitting machine adapted to knit a body yarn and a terry loop yarn, a, circular series of needles, a series of sinkers located in proximity to said needles and having surfaces extending transversely to said needles over which surfaces loops of body yarn are drawn by said needles, a second series of sinkers each located alongside one of said first named sinkers and each having a surface at a higher elevation than said first named surfaces over which loops of Said terry yarn are drawn, means for operating said needles, means for effecting movement of said sinkers of said first series radially of the needle circle, and means for independently effecting relative radial movement of the sinkers of said second series with respect to the sinkers of said first series.

14. In a circular knitting machine adapted to knit a, body yarn and a terry loop yarn, a circular series of needles, a series of sinkers located in proximity to said needles and having surfaces extending transversely to said needles over Which surfaces loops of body yarn are drawn by said needles, a second series of sinkers each located alongside one of said first named sinkers and each having a surface at a higher elevation than said first named surfaces over which loops of said terry yarn are drawn, means for operating said needles, means for operating said sinkers of said first series to cause said needles to form body loops, and means for operating said sinkers of said second series to cause said needles to form terry loops in advance of the point where the body loops are formed.

15. In a circular knitting machine adapted to knit a body yarn and a terry loop yarn. a circular series of needles, an annular sinker guide having radial slots, a series of sinkers mounted in said slots and adapted to draw loops of body yarn, a second series of sinkers each mounted in a slot with one of said first named sinkers and having a part of greater elevation than the yarn engaging parts of said first named sinkers for drawing loops of terry yarn, means for operating said needles, and means for effecting movement of said sinkers radially of the needle circle.

16. In a circular knitting machine adapted to knit a body yarn and a terry loop yarn, a circular series of needles, an annular sinker guide having radial slots, a series of sinkers mounted in said slots and adapted to draw loops of body yarn, a second series of sinkers each mounted in a slot with one of said first named sinkers and having a part of greater elevation than the yarn engaging parts of said first named sinkers for drawing loops of terry yarn, means for operating said needles, and means for effecting movement of the sinkers of each series radially of the needle circle independently of the movement of the sinkers of the other series.

17. In a circular knitting machine adapted to knit a body yarn and a terry loop yarn, a circular series of needles, an annular sinker guide having radial slots, a series of sinkers mounted in said slots and adapted to draw loops of body yarn, said sinkers including plain sinkers and saw-tooth sinkers arranged in alternate slots and having body loop drawing shoulders of equal height, a second series of sinkers each located in a slot with one of said first named sinkers and each having a terry loop drawing shoulder substantially higher than said first named shoulders, means for operating said needles, and means for operating said sinkers and causing said second series of sinkers to cooperate with said needles to draw terry loops in advance of the point where loops of body yarn are drawn over said rst named sinkers.

18. In a circular knitting machine adapted to knit a body yarn and a terry loop yarn, a circular series of needles, a series of sinkers located in proximity to said needles and having surfaces extending transversely to said needles over which surfaces loops of body yarn are drawn by said needles, a second series of sinkers each located alongside one of said first named sinkers and each having a surface at a higher elevation than said first named surfaces over which loops of said terry yarn are drawn, means for maintaining a separation of said yarns as they pass to said needles with the terry yarn above the body yarn, means for operating said needles, and means for actuating said sinkers and causing the sinkers of said second series to enter between said yarns in advance of the point Where body loops are formed by said rst named sinkers.

19. In a circular knitting machine adapted to knit a body yarn and a terry loop yarn, a circular series of needles, a series of sinkers located in proximity to said needles and having surfaces extending transversely to said needles over which surfaces loops of body yarn are drawn by said needles, a second series of sinkers each located alongside one of said first named sinkers and each having a surface at a higher elevation than said rst named surfaces over which loops of said terry yarn are drawn, said surfaces on said second named sinkers terminating in inwardly projecting nebs, means for maintaining a separation of said yarns as they pass to said needles, means for operating said needles, and means for actuating said sinkers and causing the nebs of said second named sinkers to enter between said yarns.

20. In a circular knitting machine adapted to knit a body yarn and a terry loop yarn, a circular series of needles, a series of sinkers located in proximity to said needles and having surfaces extending transversely to said needles over which surfaces loops of body yarn are drawn by said needles, a second series of sinkers each located alongside one of said first named sinkers and each having a surface at a higher elevation than said rst named surfaces over which loops of said terry yarn are drawn, means for operating said needles, means including cams for operating said rst named sinkers, and means for operating said second named sinkers and causing portions thereof to pass beneath one of said cams to permit radial inward movement of said second named sinkers when said first named sinkers are moved radially outward.

2l. In a circular knitting machine adapted to knit a body yarn and a terry loop yarn, a circular series of needles, a series of sinkers arranged around the needle circle and provided with upwardly extending butts, said sinkers having surfaces extending transversely to said needles over which surfaces loops of body yarn are drawn, a second series of sinkers each located alongside one of said rst named sinkers and each having a surface at a higher elevation than said first named surfaces over which loops of terry yarn are drawn, said sinkers of said second series having short upwardly extending butts, means for operating said needles, means including cams for effecting radial inward and outward movements of said first named sinkers by engagement with their butts, and means engaging the butts of said second named sinkers for moving them radially inward at a place where the first named sinkers are moved outward with the butts of said second named sinkers passing under portions of one of said cams.

22. In a circular knitting machine adapted to knit a body yarn and a terry loop yarn, a circular series of needles, a series of sinkers arranged around the needle circle and provided with upwardly extending butts, said sinkers having surfaces extending transversely to said needles over which surfaces loops of body yarn are drawn, a second series of sinkers each located alongside one of said ilrst named sinkers and each having a surface at a higher elevation than said rst named surfaces over which loops of terry yarn are drawn, said sinkers of said second series having short upwardly extending butts, means for operating said needles, means including cams for effecting radial inward and outward movements of said first named sinkers by engagement with their butts, and means engaging the butts of said second named sinkers for moving them radially inward at a place where the first named sinkers are moved outward with the butts of said second named sinkers passing under portions of one 0f said cams, said last named cam being recessed on its under side to receive the butts of said second named sinkers.

23. In a circular knitting machine adapted to knit a body yarn and a terry loop yarn, a circular series of needles, a series of sinkers arranged around the needle circle and having surfaces extending horizontally over which loops of body yarn are drawn, a second series of sinkers each

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification66/92, 66/186, 66/125.00B, 66/108.00R, 66/93
International ClassificationD04B15/00, D04B1/02, D04B15/06
Cooperative ClassificationD04B1/02, D04B9/12, D04B15/06, D04B15/58, D04B15/18, D04B1/26
European ClassificationD04B15/06, D04B1/26, D04B1/02, D04B9/12, D04B15/18, D04B15/58