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Publication numberUS2437408 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 9, 1948
Filing dateJul 25, 1946
Priority dateJul 25, 1946
Publication numberUS 2437408 A, US 2437408A, US-A-2437408, US2437408 A, US2437408A
InventorsSoet John C
Original AssigneeSoet John C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Blood drawing instrument
US 2437408 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 9, 194 8. v v J c 5051' 2,437,408

. BLOOD DRAWING INSTRUMENT Fild July 25, 1946 2 Sheets-Sheet l March 9, 1948. J. c. SOET 2,437,408

BLOOD DRAWING INSTRUMENT Filed July 25, 1946 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Mar. 9, 1948 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE BLOOD DRAWING INSTRUMENT John C. Soet, Grand Rapids, Mich. Application July 25, 1946, Serial No. 686,250

1 c r i This invention pertains to surgical instruments and relates more particularly to improvements in blood drawing instruments. The particular problem towhich this invention is addressed is that of. obtaining sizable samples of human blood for pathological analysis and under conditions whereja large number of samples must be taken by a single physician or technicianwithin a given period of time and with a minimum of inconvenience and delay with respect to the donor. 'I'hisinvention finds outstanding utility in the medical departments of large industrial plants where syphilitic examination of agreat numberpf persons is required. Blood drawingrinstruments'for this purpose comprise an evacuated vial or glass tube for receiving the blood, 'a tubular needle for withdrawing the blood from the vein of a. person and conducting it into the vial or tube,'and preferably, some form of means for holding the vial or tube and the needle in an operative relation.

It is the general purpose of this invention to provide a simple blood drawing instrument'of this type which may be used with a maximum of convenience and speed and therefore possess, to

6" Claims. (01. 128-276) a high degree, surgical maneuverability, which is a. primary essential forvthe purposes outlined.

It is one of the objects'of this invention to provide a blood drawing-instrument 01 the type described inwhich the means for holding the blood vial and tubulanneedle are constructed and arranged so that these parts may be detachably retained and released upon completion of the blood drawing operation with an absolute minimum of efiort. I

A specific feature of improvementresid'es in the provision of an instrument comprising an elongated handle" with a head portion extending laterally from one end-thereof and provided with resilient needle-clamping' means which may be instantly operated by the touch of a finger;

In a more specific aspect, it is a further object of this invention to provide in combination with a blood drawing instrument having a handle and means for detachably supporting a blood vial for reciprocation along the handle to receive one end of thetubular needle, a resilient needle-clamping means which includes a plunger extending from one end of the handle and formed and arranged to cooperate with a formed portion of the handle releasably to engage the needle by a collar f xed intermediate its end and to maintain the needle against movement in'any direction." Still more specifically, it is intendedto provide in this novel combination a button releasing means for the 2 plunger of the clamping means so that the collar of the needle may be engaged or released so as to fall free of the handle by a light touch of a fingen Further novel features of improvement contributing to ease and speed in operation and simplifying the construction of instruments of this nature will be apparent and readily understood from the following detailed description of an illustrative embodiment of the invention, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which: I I

Fig. 1 is a perspective view showing the assembled blood drawing instrument in the hands of auser as the needle is being mounted on the handle;

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the instrument in use with .the needle inserted in a vein of the arm'of a donorv and the blood vial in cooperative position to receive blood conducted by the needle;

Fig. 3 is a side elevation, partly in section, of the completely assembled instrument of this inventiomthe section being along the line 33 of Fig. 5;

Fig.4 is a partial side elevation of the head portion of the instrument handle with aneedle engaged by, the needle-clamping means;

i Fig. 5 is a front elevation of the handle and needle shown in Fig. 4;

Fig; 6 is a section of the head portion of the handle and a clamped needle, as seen along the line 65 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 7 isa cross-sectional view of the assembled instrument taken on the line of Fig. 3, and

' Fig. 8 is a perspective view showing the handle of the instrument in the hand of a user, the needle having just been released by the needleclamping means. I

Referring particularly to Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the numeral lfl refers, to the complete instrument which includes an evacuated blood vial I2 having a' perforable rubber stopper l3 arranged for reception of a needle M which is of the tubular hypodermic type.

The'vi al l2 and needle M are supported in operative relation by an elongated instrument handle l6 provided with sliding carriage means 18 for the vial and quick-release needle-clamping means 20 carried by a head portion 22 of the handleand constructed and arranged to cooperate with this head portion in releasably enaging a collar 24 which is secured to the needle I 4 intermediate its length.

;'I he carriage 111168.115 l8, which is appreciably shorter than either the vial I2 or handle ID, in-

cludes a pair of inturned depending legs 28, 28 (Fig. '7) forming therewith a channel and slidably engaging suitably shaped angular, longitudinal track grooves 28, 28 formed in opposite sides of the instrument handle I6. The free ends of the track groove formations have depressed end corners 30, Si] (Fig. 3) for preventing separation of the carriage it from the handle I6. On its outer side the sliding carriage I8 is provided with a longitudinally spaced pair of spring clips 32 for detachably engaging the blood vial I2, and with an end abutment or stop 34 for the bottom or closed end of the vial.

Particular attention is now directed to the details of construction and the arrangement of the head portion 22 and the needle-clamping means 20. These details are shown best in Figs. 3, 4, 5., 6 and 8. Figs. 3 and 6 indicate that the head portion 22 extends laterally from one end of the instrument handle IS and on the side which supports the carriage means I8, so that the needle I4'will engage and perforate the rubber stop per I3 of the evacuated vial I2 when the latter is slid forwardly to the position shown in Fig. 2.

The head portion22 is formed with the lengthwise extending, through bore 35 accommodating at its extending end an outwardly projecting plunger 33 of generally hook shape for engaging the needle collar 24, and at its handle base end a releasing or operating button 40. A small con.- necting rod 42 joins the plunger 38 and button 40 within the head portion 22 and is encircled by a compression spring 44 which engages the inner concealed end of button 4|] and a trans verse pin 46 which extends throu h the bore adjacent one side of the rod 42 as shown in Figs. 3 and 6. The function of the pin 46, which is supported at its ends by thehead Portion 22, is to provide a fixed abutment on one en Of the com.- pression spring 44 so as to normally maintain the hook-shaped plunger 38 in retracted clamping position, from which it maybe released by push.- ing the button 48 inwardly against th spr n 44. Preferably the clamping means 20 is held against'rotation from the position shown by flattening the adjacentsides of the connecting rod 42 and the transverse retaining pin 46 (Fig. 6).

With reference to Figs. 4, 5 and 8, it will be observed that the head portion 22 is pnoyided with a transverse slot 48 which is only slightly longer than the needle collar 24, which it receives, and that the adjacent sides of the generally rectangular head portion are formed with longitudinally aligned needlenotchesfifl, 50 for receiving the needle I4 at opposite ends of the collar 24. These notches 5%], 50 are formed with vertical faces 54, 54 on their inner sides and inwardly inclined faces '56, 56 on their outer sides, said inclined faces terminating a short distance above the bottoms of the notches and the correspond? ing outer end of the head portion 22 being slightly shorter than that-defined by the tops of the ver tical faces 54,54. V

The generally hook-shaped plunger .38 has a special configuration for efficient cooperation with the collar 24. As shown in Fig. 6, the plunger 38 has a flat top merging with a larger and generally vertical concave surface il .complemental to the circular cross section of the knurled collar 24 and. terminating in a bottom, curved slope portion 62. The flat top portion 53, complemental concave surface 60 and the bottom, curved slope portion 62 cooperate with the transverse slot 48 andpaligned notches 5.0, 50 of the head portion 22 to maintain the needle in fixed operative relation to the handle 60 and at the same time permit it to be quickly released and fall freely when the operating button 40 is depressed (Fig. 8), with curved slope portion 62 tending to roll the collar out of the plunger 38.

The importance of the novel features of the instrument of this invention and its particular advantages will be clearly understood from the following description of a typical blood drawing operation, Fig. 1 shows the manner of grasping the handle I6 of the instrument for insertion of a sterileneedle I4 into the clamping means 20 carried by the head portion 22. The handle I5 is held on opposite side faces by the thumb and second, third and fourth fingers, respectively, of the right hand of a physician or other technician. The fourth finger of this right hand naturally falls into a position for engaging and depressing the button 40 on the bottom or base of the handle I6 for releasing the needle-clamping means 20 and permitting the needle collar 24 to be inserted from below by the left hand of the person using the instrument. When the collar has been so inserted and aligns with the hook-shaped plunger 33 .and the slot 48. of the head portion 22, release of the operating button 40 is all that is necessary to lock the needle in a fixed p'bsition with respect to the handle I5. While Fig, 1 shows the evacuated blood vial It already in place on the carriage means 18., it may be found preferable to mount or clamp the needle to the head portion 22 before the evacuated vial I2 with its perforable sealing means or stopper I3 is added.

The carriage means I8 and the attached vial 12 will not be advanced from the retracted position shown in Figs. 1 and 3 until after the lumen of the needle I4 is just underneath the skin but not into the vein of the donor. Then the blood vial is pushed forward along the handle I6 by means of. the carriage stop portion 34, which may be engaged by the end of the thumb of the left hand ofv the physician, or technician, as clearly shown in Fig. 2. The instrument is then advanced forward by the right hand gripping the handle I6 so that the needle is caused to enter the vein and the blood runs into the evacuated vial I2, the parts being in the relative positions of Fig. 2. After the blood vial I2 is filled, the needle is withdrawn out of the vein by pulling the whole instrument I0, after which the blood vial I2 and carriage I8 are pulled back into their original position and the former removed from the instrument. Without materially changing the position in which the right hand grasps the thumb of the instrument In, or even so much as rotating the instrument appreciably about its longitudinal axis, the used needle I4 may be quickly dropped clear of the instrument by merely depressing the operating button 40 with a light touch of the forefinger of the right hand. Then, without appreciable delay or loss of time, the Whole operation may be repeated on the next donor. 7

The blood drawing instrument of this invention has been used on thousands of patients with a minimum of discomfort and annoyance and with a rapidity of operation that has made it possible to maintain routine blood tests of large groups in venereal control clinics where it would not have otherwise been possible because of the time required of both technicians and patients.

Having thus described my invention what I claim as novel and desire to secure by Letters lPatent of the United States is:

1. A blood drawing instrument comprising an elongated handle having a head portion extending laterally from one end thereof, carriage means reciprocable longitudinally of the handle on the side toward which the head portion extends, a blood vial detachably engaged by the carriage means for reciprocation therewith and having perforable sealing means at the end adjacent the head portion, a needle adapted to perforate said sealing means and conduct blood into the vial, and resilient needle-clamping means cooperable with the head portion of the handle releasably to engage the needle intermediate its length and maintain it against longitudinal movement with one end in position to perforate the sealing means when said sealing means is reciprocated into engagement therewith, said needle-clamping means and head portion being constructed and arrange to discharge the needle from one side of the head portion.

2. A blood drawing instrument comprising an elongated handle having a head portion extending laterally from one end thereof; carriage means reciprocable longitudinally of the handle on the side toward which the head portion extends; a blood vial detachably engaged by the carriage means for reciprocation therewith and having perforable sealing means at the end adjacent the head portion; a needleadapted to perforate said sealing means and conduct blood into the vial; and resilient needle-clamping means cooperable with the head portion of the handle releasably to engage the needle intermediate its length and maintain it against longitudinal movement with one end in position to perforate the sealing means when said sealing means is reciprocated into engagement therewith, said needle clamping means and head portion being constructed and arranged to discharge the needle from one side of the head portion.

3. A blood drawing instrument comprising an elongated handle having a head portion extending laterally from one end thereof; carriage means reciprocable longitudinally of the handle on the side toward which the head portion extends; said head portion being formed to provide a bore extending lengthwise thereof; a blood vial detachably engaged by the carriage means for reciprocation therewith and having perforable sealing means at the end adjacent the head portion; a needle adapted to perforate said sealing means and conduct blood into the vial; and resilient needle-clamping means including a plunger in the bore of said head portion and cooperable with one end of the head releasably to engage the needle intermediate its length and maintain one end of the needle in position to perforate the sealing means when said sealing means is reciprocated into engagement therewith, and plunger operating means projecting from the other end of the head portion.

4. A blood drawing instrument comprising an elongated handle having a head portion extending laterally from one end thereof; carriage means reciprocable longitudinally of the handle on the side toward which the head portion extends, said head portion being formed to provide a bore extending lengthwise thereof; a blood vial detachably engaged by the carriage means for reciprocation therewith and having perforable sealing means at the end adjacent the head portion; a needle adapted to perforate said sealing means and conduct blood into the vial; and needleclamping means including a, plunger in the bore of said head portion shaped and arranged to oooperate with one end of the head portion releasably to hold the needle when the needle is positioned to perforate the sealing means as said seal-.

ing means advances with the carriage means into engagement therewith, plunger operating means projecting from the other end of the head portion, and spring means arranged within the bore of said head portion to bias the plunger into clamping position and the operating means into projecting position.

5. A blood drawing instrument comprising an elongated handle having a head portion extending laterally from one end thereof, said head portion being formed to provide a bore extending lengthwise thereof; carriage means secured to the handie and slidable longitudinally thereof; a blood vial detachably secured to the carriage means and having perforable sealing means at the end adjacent the head portion; a needle provided with a collar intermediate its length and adapted to perforate said sealing means and conduct blood into the vial; and needle-clamping means including a plunger in the bore of said head portion formed with a hook-shaped end generally complemental to and slightly larger than the collar of the needle, a plunger operating button projecting from the other end of the head portion, and spring means arranged within the bore of said head portion to bias the plunger into retracted clamping position and the operating button into projecting position, said head portion being formed with spaced aligned notches for receiving the needle at opposite ends of the collar and a transverse slot opposite the hook-shaped end of the plunger and slightly longer than the collar, said slot permitting lateral insertion and withdrawal of the needle collar when the needle is out of the notches and preventing longitudinal shifting of the needle when clamped.

6. In a blood drawing instrument, the combination comprising an elongated handle having a head portion extending laterally from one end thereof, said head portion being formed to provide a bore extending lengthwise thereof; carriage means slidably secured to the handle for movement longitudinally thereof, said carriage means being constructed and arranged detachably to secure thereto on the side of the handle toward which the head portion extends, a blood vial having perforable sealing means at the end adjacent the head portion; and needle-clamping means including a plunger arranged in the bore of said head portion for cooperative engagement with a needle provided with a collar intermediate its length and adapted to perforate said sealing means and conduct blood into the vial, said plunger being formed with a hook-shaped end generally complemental to and slightly larger than the collar of the needle, a plunger operating button projecting from the other end of the head portion, and spring means arranged within the bore of said'head portion to bias the plunger into retracted clamping position and the operating button into projecting position, said head portion being formed with spaced aligned notches for receiving the needle at opposite ends of the collar and a transverse slot opposite the hook-shaped end of the plunger and slightly longer than the collar, said notches and slot permitting lateral insertion and withdrawal of the needle collar when the needle is out of the bottoms of the notches and preventing longitudinal shifting of the needle when clamped.

JOHN C. SOET.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2639709 *Nov 9, 1950May 26, 1953Volgenau Robert HBlood extracting device
US2727517 *Oct 4, 1954Dec 20, 1955Arthur Wilkin WilliamBlood collecting apparatus
US3123073 *Aug 26, 1958Mar 3, 1964 Blood sampling assembly
US3326206 *May 31, 1966Jun 20, 1967Courtland LabBlood sampling device with releasable cannula retaining means
US3753432 *Mar 10, 1971Aug 21, 1973Guerra LHypodermic syringe for blood tests
US4295476 *Dec 19, 1979Oct 20, 1981Becton, Dickinson And CompanyBlood collection assembly for preventing outward movement of the blood container
US4777964 *May 20, 1987Oct 18, 1988David BriggsSystem for obtaining blood samples and submitting for testing of aids
US4976271 *May 8, 1989Dec 11, 1990Blair Paul ABlood drawing system
US4979515 *Oct 17, 1988Dec 25, 1990David BriggsSystem for obtaining blood samples and submitting for testing of AIDS
US8096958 *Feb 4, 2005Jan 17, 2012Sarstedt Ag & CoBlood-collection device for newborn babies and infants
WO1989010764A1 *May 4, 1989Nov 16, 1989Paul A BlairBlood drawing system
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/577, 604/240
International ClassificationA61M5/32, A61B5/15
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/3205, A61B5/150732, A61B5/15003, A61B5/154, A61B5/150259, A61B5/150351, A61M2005/3206, A61B5/150496, A61B5/1438, A61B5/150389
European ClassificationA61B5/15B20, A61B5/15B12, A61B5/15B18B8F, A61B5/15B8N, A61B5/154, A61B5/15B2D, A61B5/15B18B2, A61B5/14B12, A61M5/32C