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Publication numberUS2438133 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 23, 1948
Filing dateAug 10, 1944
Priority dateAug 10, 1944
Publication numberUS 2438133 A, US 2438133A, US-A-2438133, US2438133 A, US2438133A
InventorsSparklin Charles H
Original AssigneeBirtman Electric Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Split cylindrical housing for suction cleaners
US 2438133 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 23, 394%. c. H. SPARKLIN 2,438,133

SPLIT CYLINDRICAL HOUSING FOR SUCTION CLE ANE IRS Filed Aug. 10, 1944 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 J/77067/ZOZ? March 23, M. c, H, SPARKUN 2,438,133

SPLIT CYLINDRICAL HOUSING FOR SUCTION CLEANERS Filed Aug. 10, 194-4 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 March 23,- 1948. C, SPARKUN 2,438,133

SPLIT CVYLINDRICAL HOUSING FOR SUCTION CLEANERS Filed Aug. 10, 1944 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 amh 3, 1948. v

SPLIT CYLINDBICAL HOUSING FOR SUCTION CLEANERS Filed Aug. 10, 1944 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 c. H. SPARKLIN 2,438,133 f Patented Mar. 23, 1948 SPLIT CYLINDRICAL HOUSING FOR SUCTION CLEANERS Charles H. Sparklin, Chicago, Ill., assignor to Birtman Electric Company, a corporation of Illinois Application August 10, 1944, Serial No. 548,920

6 Claims. 1

This invention relates to a suction cleaner and more particularly to a suction cleaner of the tank type in which the tank is substantially cylindrical in outline and is split on a substantially horizontal plane to form upper and lower housing members which abut on that horizontal plane to form an airtight container.

The invention is illustrated in the drawings in which Figure l is a side elevation of the housing; Figure 2 is a plan view thereof; Figure 3 is an end elevation thereof from one end of the cleaner; Figure 4 is an end elevation of the other end of the cleaner; Figure 5a is a sectional elevation of the motor end of the housing; Figure 5b is a similar view of the other end of the housing; Figure 6 is a sectional elevation taken along the line 66 in Figure 5a; Figure 7 is a similar view taken along the line in Figure 5a; Figure 8 is a similar view taken along the line 8-8 in Figure 5a; and Figure 9 is a fragmentary plan view of the lower housing member illustrating the flow of air from the fan chamber to the exhaust.

The cleaner comprises the housing 20 which is split on the horizontal plane 2! into an upper housing member 22 and a lower housing member 23. The upper housing member is provided with a handle 24. This handle is made up of a stud 25 which is an integral part of the casting, the handle proper 26 which is secured to the studs by any appropriate fastening and the arms 21 which are pivotally mounted on the handle proper at 28 as shown in Figure '7. The arms 21 are an integral part of the front portion 29 of the upper housing member. This rear portion forms a removable lid which is latched to the lower housing member 23 by any appropriate latching device 30. The lid is provided with an air inlet 3| having an annular groove 32 adapted to engage the ordinary hose. The lid also carries a dust bag 33 having a substantially rigid neck portion 34 provided with a flange 35 having a resilient annular gasket 36.

The lid is provided with a semi-annular grooved stud 3! within which the flange 35 may be slid from below, when the lid has been raised. The

- lower edge of the flange 35 abuts when the lid is closed against the horizontal flange 39 of the lower casting, against which it is pressed by the edge 4!] of the lid. It will be observed that in this manner the bag is sealed between the upper and lower housing members in airtight engagement. Furthermore, the bag is automatically removed by lifting of the lid which may be accomplished by lifting the latching member 30. The

2 front portion of the housing forms a dust collecting chamber 4| which contains the dust bag 33. Adjacent this chamber is a filter chamber 59 containing a filter 5! which may consist of a screen 52 having a cloth cover 53. This screen is carried in a semi-annular groove 54 in the lower housing member and is pressed against a semiannular plate 55 in the upper housing member by a semi-annular stud 56 which is an integral part of the rear upper housing member 29. When the lid 29 is raised, the stud 58 is also raised, thereby freeing the upper portion of the filter. The filter is flexible and may be bent sufiiciently to the rear to grasp it and withdraw it from the groove 54. In order to form an airtight connection, the stud 56 is provided with a groove 51 into which the flange 58'penetrates. Immediately adjacent the flange 58 is a semi-annular groove 55 containing a gasket 60 against which the stud 55 presses to seal the filter in the upper half of the housing. The engagement with the groove 55 is sufliciently tight to seal the lower half of the filter.

Immediately to the rear of the filter chamber 50 there is a fan chamber In. The split wall 1! between the filter chamber and the fan cham ber defines one side of the fan chamber and is provided with a metal sleeve 12 which directs air from the filter chamber into the fan 13. This fan comprises sheet metal walls 14 and 55 between which are mounted a plurality of curved blades which direct the air outwardly as indi cated by the arrows in Figure 5. The fan is driven by the extension 16 of the motor shaft Tl. Behind the wall 15 is a secondary chamber 18 with in which are mounted a plurality of stationary blades 78 carried by the metal plate which is mounted by a flange 8| in the split partition wall 82. The internal edges of this wall define a circular opening within which the flange 8! is fitted. A second rotary fan likewise carried by the shaft extension 16 forms the third division of the fan chamber. This fan, like the first, comprises a pair of spaced parallel sheet metal walls 91 and 92 having curved blades 93 whichdirect the air outwardly toward the wallsof the housing. A fourth sub-compartment 94 of the fan chamber is formed by the sheet metal wall 9| of the fan and the split partition walls 95 and 95a. These walls are provided with openings 9? and 98, as shown in Figure 6, through which the air may pass from the fan chamber.

To the rear of the fan chamber is the motor chamber I00 which isdivided into three compartments, I01, I52 and I I13 by the split partition and IE2.

3 walls I04 and Wm and I05 and I05a. These split walls also provide a circular seat for the field I06 of the motor I'I. The compartment I03 is bounded by the walls I and I05a and the split walls I 08 and I08a. Walls 95 and 95a and walls I08 and I08a are each provided with a circular central opening between them in each of which one of the bearings of the motor is mounted. These bearings, which are best shown in Figure 5a, comprise an annular gasket IIO mounted in a groove in the collar III. Within the collar is a ball-bearing assembly II2. Corresponding members in the wall I08 are indicated by IIOa, IIIa and 211. The entire motor and its shaft, except for the shaft I6, is carried between these two bearings. The commutator H5 is immediately adjacent the rear bearing II2a.

openings H1 in the side walls of the housing. Split bafile walls I20 and I20a are provided immediately adjacent and behind the walls I05 and IBM to assist in directing air through the openings I2I and I22 in the Walls I08 and I08a. The air passing out of these openings is confined by the transverse split walls I25 and I25a shown in Figure 9 and the airis thence exhausted through the louvres I30. Within the walls I25 and I25a are the longitudinal split walls I3I and I3Ia and I32 and I32a leaving openings I33 and I34, as shown in Figures 9 and -5a. The path of the air is, therefore, through the motor through openings I2I and I22 and then through openings I33 and I 34 to central opening I25 formed between walls I25 and I250. andthence to the louvres.

An auxiliary central opening I40, however, is also provided at the rear of the housing. This opening is normally closed by a split gate MI which is urged into closed position by springs I42 and I43. When it is desired to operate the cleaner as a blower, the customary hose connection is inserted in the opening I40 pressing the split gate I II aside and is then extended through the opening I35, thereby cutting oil? access to the louvres and directing all of the exhaust air through the hose.

A rib I50 is indicated in Figure 5a supporting the wall 95a.

Suitable means for moving the housing are provided, as for example the wheels I60 which are mounted within the housing in the pockets I6I A lug I63 at the front end of the housing provides a slide or skid, but may, of course, be replaced by a wheel if desired. The upper and lower housing members are held together with any suitable fastening means. 'Thepreferred means comprises the bolts I10, best shown in Figures 6 and 9. These extend from openings in the bottom of the housing upwardly through the lower partition walls which are enlarged to form sleeves I12 and into threaded bosses I'I3 formed by enlargement of the upper partition walls. The housing is preferably cast from .a light metal such as aluminum or magnesium-or their alloys, but may be cast. (molded) from a non-metallic substance such as a plastic..

The foregoing detailed description has been given for cleamess of understanding only, and no unnecessary limitations should be understood therefrom.

What I claim as new and-desireto' secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A suction cleaner comprising a cast housing including a suction chamber, a motor chamber ,with a motor mounting therein, a .fan chamber,

The commutator brushes I I 6 are inserted through the and a dust collecting chamber having a mounting for a dust collecting means, said housing being split centrally and horizontally into upper and lower housing members provided with a plurality of integrally cast transverse partition walls, at least a pair of which define a fan chamber and are adapted for mounting centrally therein a plurality of enclosed fans, at least one of which rotates and moves air in direct contact with the housing walls.

2. In a suction cleaner, a cast housing split centrally and horizontally into upper and lower housing members and provided with a plurality of integrally cast transverse split vertical partition walls three of which define a fan chamber,

each of said three split walls being shaped to define a central opening, the opening in the first of said walls communicating directly with the central portion of a centrifugal fan adapted to rotate in a plane parallel to said first wall and directing air against the housing; a stationary fan adjacent and parallel to the centrifugal fan and mounted around the central opening of the second split partition wall on the side next to the first wall, said stationary fan adapted to direct air from the housing through the opening in said second wall to the inside of a second centrifugal fan mounted between the second and third split walls and parallel to the stationary fan and adapted to rotate in a. plane parallel to the first centrifugal fan and to direct air outwardly against the housing in the area between the second and third split walls.

3. A suction cleaner as set forth in claim 2 in which the second centrifugal fan is mounted on a hub extending through the central opening of a third split partition wall.

4. A cleaner as set forth in claim 2 in which a collar is provided in the central opening of the first partition wall extending within the centrifugal fan to confine the movement of air through the partition wall to the centrifugal fan.

5. A cleaner as set forth in claim 2 in which the stationary fan is provided with the collar extending through the central opening in the second partition wall within the second centrifugal fan.

6. In a suction cleaner, 9, cast housing split centrally and horizontally into upper and lower housing members and provided with a plurality of integrally cast transverse split vertical partition walls, each of said split walls being shaped to define a central opening, the opening in one of said walls ommunicating directly with the central portion of a centrifugal fan adapted to rotate in a plane parallel to the wall and directing air against the housing; a stationary fan adjacent the centrifugal fan and mounted in the central opening of a second split partition wall, said stationary fan adapted to direct air from the housing to the inside of a second centrifugal fan adjacent the stationary fan and adapted to rotate in a plane parallel to the first centrifugal fan and 'to direct air outwardly against the housing; an

electric motor within the housing having a shaft connectedto each of said rotatable fans, a dust compartment within the housing and communicating with'the first of said fans, an inlet to said dust chamber, a dust collector therein communicating with-said inlet, and an air outlet from the housing connected to the dust chamber through the fans.

CHARLES H. SPARKLIN.

(References on following page) i I REFERENCES CETED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date Peterson J an. 5, 1915 Bartlett Apr. 19, 1921 Townsend Apr. 18, 1933 Burke May 2, 1933 Moran et a1. May 9, 1933 Baumann Nov. 3, 1942 Lofgren June 10, 1941 Number Number

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2532264 *Oct 22, 1947Nov 28, 1950Gen ElectricTank type vacuum cleaner
US2564469 *Feb 25, 1946Aug 14, 1951Electrolux CorpVacuum cleaner
US2605858 *Oct 19, 1950Aug 5, 1952Gen ElectricCanister type suction cleaner
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Classifications
U.S. Classification55/373, 417/363, 415/223, 415/199.1, 55/472, 55/356, 55/372, 417/423.2, 15/327.2, 415/201
International ClassificationA47L5/36, A47L5/22
Cooperative ClassificationA47L5/362
European ClassificationA47L5/36A