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Publication numberUS2439508 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 13, 1948
Filing dateJul 14, 1942
Priority dateJul 14, 1942
Publication numberUS 2439508 A, US 2439508A, US-A-2439508, US2439508 A, US2439508A
InventorsJohnson Lester M, Lowell Edwards Miles, Macbain Donald K
Original AssigneeWeyerhaeuser Timber Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Log turning apparatus
US 2439508 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 13, 1948. M. L. EDWARDS El AL 2,439,508

LOG TURNING APPARATUS Filed July 14, L 1942 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 MILES LOWELL EDWARDS LESTER M. JOHNSON DONALD K. Moc B N INVE RS April 13, 1948. M, EDWARDS ET AL 2,439,508

LOG TURNING APPARATUS Filed July 14, 1942 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 MILES LOWELL vEDWARDS LESTER M. JOHNSON DONALD K. Mac BAIN INV ATTORNEY April 13, 1948. L. W DS 5' AL 2,439,508

LOG TURNING APPARATUS Filed July 14, 1942 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 ,4 Trap/V v Patented Apr. 13, 1948 orrlca momma mam-ms wuumu Edwards and Donald K. mam,

and Wash nllnon Lester to Weyerhaeuser Timber Oom- M. Johnson, Everett,

' pany, Lonlvicw, Wash, a corporation of Washington Application July 14 1942, Serial No. 450,838

8 8 Claims. (Cl. 144-208) 1 The present invention relates to log turning apparatus for use in connection with bark removal operations, and more particularly to apparatus for periodically shifting the log rotationally upon a support whereby diflerent successive longitudinal strip portions of the surface of the log are presented to the action of the bark removal mea In the preparation of logs for use in pulp manufacturing processes, it is necessary first to remove the bark and other foreign matters from the outer surface thereof. Letters Patent No. 2,342,533, granted February 22, 1944, to Miles Lowell Edwards for Method of removing bark from logs, discloses a method of removing bark from logs by means of hydraulic jets which are moved longitudinally relative to the surface of the log. Depending upon the number of nozzlesemployed and the jet size, only a relatively narrow strip of bark can be removed from the log surface at each application of the Jets to the log. It is necessary, therefore, in order to effect complete removal of the bark from the log, to pass the nozzles longitudinally of the log a plurality of times, removing different successive strips of bark at each time, until the entire outer log surface is cleaned. In order to effect the presentation of successive longitudinal strips of the log sur face to the action of the hydraulic nozzles, means must be provided for effecting predetermined an gular rotational movements oi" the log and for holding the log finnly in each successive position of adjustment.

It is a general object of the invention, therefore, to provide a new and improved log turning apparatus for periodically shifting a log rotationally upon a support, whereby different sun cessive longitudinal strip portions of the outer surface of the log are presented to the action of bark removal apparatus mounted adjacent thereto.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a new and improved arrangement in" supporting a log in a predetermined position with respect to' hydraulic bark removal jets and to provide means for effecting rotational adjustment of the log on the support, whereby different successive longitudinal strips thereof are presented to the action of the jets; and, further, for h lding the log firmly in the adjusted position throughout the bark removing operations.

A further object of the invention is to provide a new and improved arrangement for so supporting a log as to present different successive longitudinal strips of the surface thereof to the action of other surface treatment apparatus, including turning means for periodically shifting the log upon the support with a high degree of accuracy so that the entire circumferential surface of the log is exposed to the action of such surface treatment apparatus.

A further object of the invention is to provide a simplified log turning arrangement which is readily adaptable to logs of differing diameters without requiring any adjustment in accordance with the log size.

A further object of the invention is to provide a log turning apparatus which is capable of effecting rotation of logs upon a support through predetermined angular increments substantially irrespective of variations in diametric size of the logs and also irrespective of the cross sectional configuration thereof.

In accordance with the illustrated embodiment of the invention, the apparatus comprises a suitable support upon which a log may be loosely positioned. A plurality of uprights, or stops, are provided along one side of the log for limiting movement of the log upon the support in the direction of the stops. The turningmeans further comprises friction means which engages circumferentially with the surface of the log on the opposite side thereof with respect to the stops and which normally exerts a pressure thereagainst so as to hold the log firmly in engagement with the stops. In the specific arrangement shown, the friction means comprises one or more toothed chains which extend at right angles with respect to the axis of the log and which are so supported on suitable sprockets or rollers that a considerable length of the chain engages closely against a sector of the log circumference, thus conforming with the surface configuration of the log and bearing thereagainst with considerable contact pressure. A driving means is associated with the chain and which, upon periodic energization, exerts a circumferential thrust upon the surface of the log for rotating the log a circumferential distance equal to a strip of bark to be removed. The arrangement of the chains is such that proper frictional engagement is had with the surface of the log substantially irespective of the diametrical size or variations in cross sectional configuration thereof. In the event that the chains in and of themselves may not be able to provide a suflicient rotational torque to the logs to effect proper adjustment thereof, an auxiliary arrangement comprising one or more nigger bars is ar-' ranged in be brought into engagement with the asaasos asto supplement the action of the chains.

,"For a consideration ofwhatis believed novel and invention. attention is directed to the following description, taken in connection with the underneath of the login such a manner accompanying drawings, whils the features of novelty will be pointedout with greater particularity in the claims appended hereto and comprising a part of the In the drawings, Figure 1 is a side elevation of the log supporting and turning. arrangement constructed in accordance with one form'of the invention; Figure 2 is a plan view of the log turningarrangement shown in Figure 1: Figure 3 is an enlarged fragmentary-view of one. detail shown in Figure 1: Figure 4 is a cross sectional rality of hydraulic jets directed thereagainst from nozzles I 3 mounted on carriage il'. Water issuing from 'the nozzles I3 and impinging against the surface portion I2 of the log it acts there'- upon with suchforce as to .eflect substantially complete removal ofthe bark'thereirom. The

nozzle carriage Il may be moved longitudinallyrelative to the log along a horizontal straight line whereby a stripof bark is removed from the log throughout the full length thereof. After one strip 01' bark has been removed from the log it is then rotated upon the support I I by means ofa to the drawings. a'log indicated in, in

; a'plu'rslity of stops or uprights 2i arranged along one side ofithe log. These stops act to limit the :i'aces of the supports I I. The stops II are prefer- 1g ably slidably mounted upon the bracket arms it view taken along the line 4-4 of Figures: and Y the uppersurfaces of the various bracket arms are horizontally aligned, the lower log portion I 2 exposed tothe'action of the hydraulic Jets from nozzles It also lies in a substantially horizontally straight line. and the distance therefrom to the l.

tips of the nozzles It is substantialiyuniform throughout the full length of the log, irrespective of the angle of taper of the log I! or the sizes of 1 different logs. e V

]'I'he log supporting arrangement alsoi'ncludes movement of the loglaterally on the bearing surfor adjustment bymeans 0! screws 32 associated.

. therewith, whereby compensation may be. made .in accordance with the'size ofthejlogs fed onto the support I I. It will be understood that thedistance-between the forward end of thebracket arms I8 and thestops should be adjusted in at; cordance with the diameter of thlog in each case in order that the "strip portion I2- of the log arms for presentation to the hydraulic jets. It

' will here 'be noted that the details ofthe log sup-' porting mechanism. I I, including the particular arrangement of the bracket arms I8, the adjustable stops 2|, and the stop adjusting means, are separately described and claimed in our copending patent application, filed concurrently here-' with,'Serial No. 450,836, entitled Log barking apparatus, now issued as Patent No. 2,396,255,i granted March 12, 1946. Insofar as the present invention is concerned, however, the particular details of the log supporting arrangement is relativelyunimportant, since the log turning: means.

"presently to beidescribed is operative as; aunit turning arrangement, indicated generally at. It,

through a predetermined ansle corr p nding generally to thevwidth of the strip of'ibarkremoved by one pass of. the nozzles,- and: theno'zzle carriage is again moved lengthwise relative to the log. By thus exposing. successive longitudinal strip portions of thelog'surface, to the action of the hydraulic jets issuing ir'om the nozzles IS, the

entire surface of the log may be cleaned of bark. The specific design of the nozzles, the nozzle supporting carriage, and the necessary controls therefor form no part of the present invention,

reference being made herein to our copending application, Serial 110,450,837, filed concurrently herewith, entitled- Log barking apparatus, now .issued as Patent No.-2,393,978, granted February 5,

1946, which describes in complete-detailone suitable form of apparatus whichmay be utilized in irrespective of the exact nature of, the 'log supporting-apparatus,

a will overhang the forward ends of the bracket For periodicallyrotating the log' I0 upon the support II" through predetermined angular-infcrements, in arde'rv that diiferent successive ion--v gitudinal strip portions .of the outer surface thereof may be presented to the action of. the

hydraulic jets issuing from nozzles I3 .fo reifecting complete removal of the barkthroughout the log circumference, the turningarrangement indicated generally at It is provided, and which,

inthespeciilc arrangement shown, is supported from a superstructure extending. above'the flo and the supporting means therefor. In general,

{the log turning apparatus comprises means for a with respect to the stops 2i and the bracket arms conjunction with the its-snowman: and turning arrangement of the present invention. It i'sto be understood that the' utility of the present in ventionis' not necessarily restricted to use with such other apparatus alone.-'

The support II mayfbe,ofyanysuitable type for holding the log II in, aigen'erally'horizontal position. As shown,- thelo'g supporting arrangee ment comprises a pluralit'ylof-f. similar bracket arms I8, it being understood that while 'only'o'ne T bracket arm ls' isishown, a number of other similar arms are positioned in linetherewith, or

at least the upper surfaces thereof engaging with the underneath surfaces of the logs are in an aligned relation. The bracket arms is are terminated adjacent the point. of bearing-contact with the undemeathjsurface of the, log so as to expose the logsuriace portion II throughout the full length thereof to the action of the Jetl. 8111 frictionally engaging with the outer surfaceof the log II) on the opposite side or sidesthereof 'Il. The-friction means normally bears against the-surface of thellog with a' considerable pre's forthe log and hold it firmly inplaceupon the support throughout'one'pass'of the nozzles.-

. Upon the completion of each pass ofthe sure. soas to provide a complemental-support.

the friction means are energizedthrough a suite able driving mechanism and cause theiog to==be rotated upon-the support II a circumferential distance equal tothe. width of the strip of bark removed by one'passof the nozzles, thereby exposing a new surface strip of the log'to the action of the hydraulic jets. vWhilevarious-fi 'u ms offriction means will suggest themselves tonne: skilled in the artfoliowing apemsaior the instant disclosure, the specific form shown herein I comprises a toothed chain iii'whichflis trained over a 'genelfa ly..-triangular. arrangementot wheels It, II and 2s., 1n yne i ;:s maybe a I sprock'et meshing with the links of chain 25 through which the chain may periodically be driven, while the wheels 21 and 28 may be merely idler rollers for positioningthe chain relative to the surface of the log l and for tensioning the chain, respectively. The sprocket 28 is mounted upon an arm 29 pivotally mounted adjacent its upper end as at 3| on beam 22 of the superstructure. The sprocket 28 is adapted to be driven through-a chain or belt 33, from a ratchet wheel 34 Journaled upon the arm 29 adjacent the upper end thereof. The ratchet wheel 24 is rotated upon the energization of a suitable motor 35 such as a servo-motor, the piston rod 38 of which is connected to the outer end of an arm 31 pivoted coaxially with the ratchet wheel 34 and having a pawl 38 thereon for engaging with the teeth on the periphery of the ratchet wheel. a

The idler wheel or sprocket 21 is Journaled for free rotation upon the lower extremity of an arm 4|, the upper end of which arm is pivotally connected as at 42 to the end of a second arm 43, which second arm is pivotally mounted as at 44 to a bracket 45 affixed to the superstructure beam 32. In the operative position of the chain 25 the sprocket 2'! depends somewhat below the horizontal plane of the axis of the log Ill and relatively closely adjacent the log surface. The idler wheel 28 is journaled upon one end of an arm 41, the opposite end of which is pivotally mounted upon a suitable bracket 48 fixedly attached to the arm 4| toward the upper end thereof. An adjustable tension spring 49 is arranged between the free end of arm 41 and the upper end of the arm 4| for applying a suitable tension to the chain 25.

Journaled upon the lowermost end of the arm 29 is an idler roller which bears against the upper surface of the chain 25 during its run between sprockets 21 and 26, urging it against the upper surface of the log l0 and, furthermore, acting as a support for the lower end of the arm 29 when the chain is in the operative or log engaging position.

Itwill be observed that the chain 25 extends at right angles with respect to the longitudinal axis of the log l0 and is wrapped around a considerable circumferential sector of the surface of the log Ill and in a closely engaging relation therewith. Irrespective of the exact surface configuration of the log and the diameter thereof,

that portion of the chain'between the wheels 5| 5 and 21 will fit snugly against the outer surface of the log.

Attached to the lower end of the arm 4| is a cable 53 extending from a motor driven drum 54 suitably mounted as upon bracket 55, which cable is provided for hoisting the log turning mechanism to the inoperative position illustrated in dotted lines for permitting loading and unloading of logs onto the support As arm 4| is raised, the chain 25 extending around the wheels 5| and 26 pulls the lower free end of the arm 29 upwardly. The cable 53 is also utilized for limiting downward movement of the arm 4| to substantially the position shown in full lines. With the arm 4| in the position shown, and with the wheel 5| provided on the lower extremity of the are which in turn will cause a predetermined length of movement of the chain 25. By virtue of the frictional engagement of the chain 25 with the periphery of log ll, the-log will be rotated in the counter-clockwise direction as viewed in Figure 1 a corresponding circumferential distance. The angle of movement is selected to correspond generally with the width of the strip of bark removed by the hydraulic jets during each pass of the nozzles.

It will be understood that as many chains 25 may be provided as are required, depending, of course, uponthe length and size of logs to be handled thereby. In the plan view of Figure 2 is illustrated a layout including two such chains. though it is to be understood, of course, that either one, or more than two, may be provided as required. In the event that a plurality of chains are used, the operation of the servo-motors therefor may be synchronized by provision of a suitable control valve (not shown) of a type well known in the art so that the rotational forces exerted upon the log through their correspond.-

ing chains will coincide in time and extent of operation.

Frequently it happens that a log is not entirely round but has one or more flattened sides. As such. a log is rotated upon supporting brackets, the flattened side bearing against either the straight side of the stop2| or the upper bearing surface of the bracket arm l8 might interfere with the ready rotation of the log solely through the operation of the chains. For assisting the chains in effecting rotational adjustment of logs which are resting upon the supports with a fiattened side against one of the bearing surfaces, there is provided one or more nigger bars 6| which are arranged beneath the log. The nigger bars 8|, having a plurality of teeth 62 on the forward upper edge thereof, are pivotally mounted as at 63 upon the end of an operating arm 64, the opposite end of which is connected tothe piston of a servo-motor 65 fixedly mounted upon a, suitable support such as beam 86 of the substructure- Depending from the rear end of thenigger bar 5| is a counterweighted portion 61 having a foot 68 normally bearing against the ad acent surface of the upper end of the operating arm 64. The operating arm 64 for the nigger bar is provided with a squared section 1| arranged to slide in a bearing 12 mounted on the beam 13 for retaining the nigger bar in the upright condition as shown. Referring to Figure 3, a log 15 is shown mounted upon the bracket arm l8 and having a flat side I6 resting against the nose of the stop 2|. The chains 25 (not shown in this figure) might not be able to exert asufilcient rotational force by virtue of their frictional engagement with the surface of the log to effect proper rotation thereof, and in such event the servo-motor 65 may be energized so as to cause upward movement of the arm 84 carrying with it the nigger bar 6|. The forward end of the nig er bar will be moved upwardly into engagement with. the lowermost surface of the log I5, tending to urge it upwardly off of the bearing surface of the bracket arm I 8. By virtue of the chains 25 and the apparatus associated therewith hearing downwardly against the log tending to resist upward movement thereof, the nigger bar arm 6| will be caused to pivot'about the bearing 63 simultaneously with movement in the upward *clirecton to some such position as is illustrated in dotted'lines. Movement of the nigger bar in this direction, however, will cause the lowermost side ofthe logto be l ger bars iustdescribed, in conjunction with the chain arrangements, logs of virtually any cross sectional configuration, which may vary substantially from circular shape, or of any size, may effectively be rotated upon the support whereby the entire surface thereof may be presented to the action of the hydraulic barking nozzles for effecting a complete removal of the bark.

Having described the principleof the invention in what is considered to be an operative embodiment thereof, it is to be understood that the specific details shown are merely illustrative, and that the invention may be carried out by other means.

We claim: 7

1. In a log turning apparatus, support means for loosely holding a log in a generally horizontal position, stops extending along one side of said log for limiting movement of said log laterally in one direction upon said support means, a chain, a pivoted arm having a roller thereon for urging said chain against the side of a log opposite said support, a second pivoted arm having a roller thereon for urging said chain against the side of said log opposite said stops, said chain between said two rollers engaging the surface of said log for holding said log on said support means against forces created by the action of a log treating mechanism acting on said log, and

port means against forces created by the action of a log treating mechanism acting on said log,

a pair of rollers engaging with one side of said chaimmeans supporting said rollersfor urging them against peripherally spaced points on the surface of a log opposite said support means,

- means tensioning said chain whereby the entire length of said chain between said two rollers is caused to contact closely with the periphery of j thelog between said two rollers, means for periodically driving said chain for causing rotation of said log. on said support, and means for mov- 'ing' said roller supports and carrying said chain and said'rollers away from said 108.

3. In a log turning apparatus, support means for loosely holding a log thereupon in a generally horizontal position including stop means for limiting movement of the log in one direction laterally of said support, an endless chain, a pluralityof rollers supporting said chain, a pair of rollers including at least one of said supporting rollers engaging one side of said chain for urging a length of'the chain between said rollersinto sup-. orting engagement with a circumferentiallyextending portion of the surface of said loggenerally opposite the bearing surfaces'of the said support means for holding said log firmly thereon, pivoted supports-for each of said rollers, mo-

moved outwardly on theouter ends of the bracket arms fl, while the chains II maintain the log I! in engagement with the stops 2!. The resultant effect will be assasoe tormeansfordriving's'aidchainforeifectingm tational movement of said log. andmeans for moving said'pairof rollers andsaidchain away from said leg.

g 4. In a log turning apparatus, the-combination comprising support means for loosely supporting -aloginagenerallyhcrizontalposition,stopsex-- tending along one side of said log-for limiting movement 'of said log laterally in one direction upon said support means, a chain engaging closely around an arcuate circumferential portion of the log surface opposite said stops for holding said log firmly against said stops during operations performed on said log, means for holding said chain against said leg at ri ht angles with respect to the axis thereof, and motor means for periodically shifting said chain for effecting rotation of said log on said support means, booster means for engaging with the underneath surface of said log, means for moving-said booster means at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the log, for assisting said chain in efi'ecting rotation of said log on said support means.

. 5. Alog supporting and turning apparatus comprising support means for the underneath surface of a log at a plurality of longitudinally spaced points for partially supporting said log in a generally horizontal position thereupon and having means for limiting movement of a log laterally of said support means in one direction, a generally triangular arrangement of wheels mounted above and on the opposite side of said log with respect to said support means, an arm pivotally mounted adjacent its upper end on the superstructure of said apparatus and hav. ing one of said wheels journaled on said arm, a

second arm pivotally vmounted on said superstructure and having a second of said wheels journaled on said arm, said latter wheel depending somewhat below the horizontal plane of the axis of the log and closely adjacent the log surface, a toothed chain trained over said wheels,

the run of said chain between said first and second wheels aforementioned being wrapped around a considerable circumferential sector of the surface of the log for holding said log on said support means, and means for driving said chain so as to rotate said 108.

comprising support means for engaging the underneath surface of a log at a plurality of iongitudinally spaced points for partially supporting said log in a generally horizontal position thereupon, said support means including means for limiting movement of a log laterally of said support means in one direction, a generally triangular arrangement of wheels mounted above and on the opposite side of said log with respect to said sup port means, an arm pivotally mounted adjacent face, a toothed chain trained over said wheels,

the run of said chain between said first and sec- 0nd wheels aforementioned being wrapped around a considerable circumferential sector of the surface of the log opposite said support means for v holding said log on said support means, means for driving "said chain so as to rotate said log, and means for-raising said arms, wheels and chain to an inoperative position above said leg for 6. A log supporting and turning apparatus its upper end on the superstructure of said appafacilitating lateral movement 7. In a log turning apparatus, the combination comprising a support for loosely holding a log thereupon in a generally horizontal position and having means for limiting movement of the log in one direction laterally of said support. an endless chain, means engaging said chain and iirging a length thereof into peripheral contact with the surface of the log opposite said support means for holding said log on said support during operations performed on said log, means for driving said chain so as to effect rotational movement of said log on said support. booster means arranged beneath said log, and means for moving said booster means in a direction at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the log and into engagement with the underneath surface of the log for assisting said chain in eifecting rotational movement of said log on said support.

8. In a log turning apparatus, support means for loosely holding a log thereupon, stops extending laterally of said support means to prevent lat. eral movement of said log in one direction, a chain engaging a sector of the periphery of said log opposite said support means and providing a complemental support for holding said log aecurely against the forces created by a log treat- L ing apparatus acting on said log, a pair of spaced of said log, during a loading and unloading operations.

engaging with means for tensioning said chain between said two rollers, and means for driving saidl chain for causing rotation of said log on said support.

MILES LOWELL EDWARDS. DONALD K. MAOBAIN. LESTER M. JOHNSON.

narnnrmons crrnn The following references areof record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 448,592 Simonson Mar. 17, 1891 559,192 McNerney Apr. 28, 1896 593,897 Jones Nov. 16, 1897 612,611 Lombard Oct. 18, 1898 702,974 Leland June 24, 1902 778,522 Wilkin 4..---- Dec. 2'7, 1904 973,428 Grabs Oct. 18, 1910 1,060,928 Mills May 6, 1913 1,300,748 Lombard Apr. 15, 1919 1,337,396 Stadig Apr. 20, 1920 1,639,856 Nelson A118.23, 1927 1,894,049 Monson et a1. Jan. 10, 1933 2,100,115 Ward Nov. 23, 1937

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US559192 *Nov 6, 1895Apr 28, 1896 Steam log loader and turner
US593897 *Jan 28, 1897Nov 16, 1897 Bark-peeling machine
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US702974 *Aug 8, 1900Jun 24, 1902William Lester LelandLog-turner.
US778522 *Apr 27, 1904Dec 27, 1904William M WilkinLog-turning mechanism.
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5538056 *Dec 16, 1994Jul 23, 1996Beloit Technologies, Inc.Log conditioning before mechanical debarking
Classifications
U.S. Classification144/208.3, 414/781, 144/208.6, 83/704
International ClassificationB27L1/14, B27L1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB27L1/14
European ClassificationB27L1/14