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Publication numberUS2439545 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 13, 1948
Filing dateNov 29, 1945
Priority dateNov 29, 1945
Publication numberUS 2439545 A, US 2439545A, US-A-2439545, US2439545 A, US2439545A
InventorsMatlas Jean
Original AssigneeMatlas Jean
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Arch support device
US 2439545 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

'April 13, 194 8. J. MATLAS 2,439,545

ARCH SUPPORT DEVICE Filed Nov. 29, 1945 INVENTOR 24 M4714:

ATTORNEY Patented Apr. 13, 1948 UNITED STATESPATENT OFFICE ARCH SUPPORT DEVICE Jean Matlas, New York, N. Y.

Application November 29, 1945, Serial No. 631,517

The present invention relates to shoe structures, more particularly to a device in the nature of a support which may be fixed in a shoe or may be inserted therein, the purpose thereof being to correct certain defects in the feet of the wearer.

It often occurs that the feet of an individual become pronated or evertedby treading on the same while wearing shoes. Flat feet are occasioned by a partial or full deformation or sagging of one or both of the arches of the foot. As a result of such deformity, the individual suffers considerable pain in walking. It is, therefore, highly desirable to provide means for building up such flattened arches in order to again restore the proper position of the bones and insure normalmuscle play, thereby avoiding the aforementioned disturbances.

When an individual walks barefooted or without the modern, relatively stifi shoe, and upon a natural surface, such as sand, sod or the like, the muscles of the feet have full play and are properly exercised. Therefore, such an individual does not usually suffer from fiat feet as the feet of primitive races prove. The introduction of the modern shoe was of considerable advantage in that it protected the feet from injury, due to outside sources, such as stepping on stones, or being hit by missiles. However, at the same time, the shoe caused internal difficulties to arise, partly because it does not consider the physiologically and anatomically adequate It is among the objects of the present invention to overcome such disadvantages and difficulties and to provide a structure which may be introduced into a shoe which will correct deformities and eliminate the pain of flat feet.

It is also among the objects of the present invention to provide a structure of this type which is simple and compact and which may be removable so that some or all of its parts might be cleaned or replaced.

The main principle of the invention consists of the combination of a rigid corrective rudderlike structure for the heel and an elastic automatically correcting functional middleand forefoot support.

In practicing the present invention, there is provided a base which may be in the form of the usual inner sole, and having perforations therein, and which constitutes the basis of the present device. On the inner sole there is formed low the scaphoid bone. This gradually slopes 4 Claims. (Cl. 36-71) i 2 down to the outer portion of the heel, said heel portion being relatively low compared to the scaphoid portion. There is also provided an outer border wedge along the side of the inner sole and a cross bar extending from the forward edge thereof across the inner sole just below the metatarsal arch. This cross .bar has a metatarsal excavation therein.

A pad is provided, usually consisting of a Water proof, flexible material filled with a deformable or fiowable pressure displaceable substance. The pad is of such size and shape that it covers the cross bar and the outer wedge and contacts with the scaphoid portion and raised heel.

In use, the act of walking causes a corrective shift of the contents of the pad and because of the relative rigidity of the cross bar and outer border, the material is forced inwardly under the longitudinal arch of the feet, thus gradually the arch is built up and the muscles supporting the game have full play because they now have a physiological function to perform. The inner edge of the cross bar also has an extension reaching toward the medial side of the big toe joint. This further accentuates the effect of forcing the soft material under the longitudinal arch to perform its intended function.

In the accompanying drawings constituting a part hereof, in which like reference characters indicate like parts, and in which:

Fig. l is a top plan view of an inner sole having the elements of the present invention formed thereon;

Fig. 2 is a similar View of the pad of deformable or fiowable material which fits on the inner sole;

Fig. 8 is a vertical cross-sectional view taken through the assembled device, and along 3-3 of Fig. 1, and Fig; 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3, taken along the line 4-4 of Fig. 1.

There is provided an inner sole I of soft flexible material, having a series of perforations 2 therein. At the scaphoid area 3 there is a builtup apex portion of considerable height, and adapted to press on the scaphoid .bone. A raised heel portion 4 has its front edge 5 extending diagonally rearwardly from its junction at 6 with scaphoid portion 3 and terminates at the outer edge l of the inner sole.

' An outer border wedge 8 relatively narrow at 9 where it joins heel 4 gradually increases in width to a maximum at the forward portion 10 thereof. A cross bar is formed by a raised part device placed in a, shoe.

ll having an arcuate central portion l2 defining a metatarsal excavation I3. The inner portion M of said cross bar is extended rearwardly a substantial distance to a point near the big toe bone.

A pad l5 has its edge [6 so formed that it rests upon wedge 8. The edge is curved upwardly as shown at H so as to partially embrace the outer edge of the foot. The inner edge l8 of pad l5 conforms with the inner edge of the inner sole and has a raised portion l9 to partially embrace the inner part of the foot. This prevents accidental displacement of the pad. The forward part 28 thereof rests on the cross bar and the rear portion has a recess 2| adapted to fit around scaphoid portion 3.

As shown in Fig. 3, the pad consists tainer made of a suitable flexible material 22, such as duck. It is filled with a suitable mixture, which in one aspect of the invention may be of a clay base suitably compounded to make a deformable or flowable mixture which can be displaced under the pressure of the foot. The pad is usually held in place by suitable means such as snap fasteners, adhesives or any other means.

A cover 24 similar to inner sole I is provided with perforations 25 and is placed at the top of the pad to cover the same. The front and rear ends of cover 24 may be suitably secured to the inner sole as by adhesive, snap fasteners, or any other means which will allow the removal of the cover for replacement of the pad.

In actual use a pad with sufficie t filling material to build up the necessary support is introduced and the device placed in the shoe. But sensitive. feet often cannot stand such drastic change of the position of the foot muscles and bones. To alleviate the pains, a pad of relatively small content-s may be first introduced and the After the wearer has used the same for some time, most of the material in the pad is forced into the region of the longitudinal arch. Therefore it raises the arch and at the same time gives the muscles thereof exercise, so that they become strengthened. Then the pad maybe removed and replaced by a thicker pad, and the use thereof still further increases the height of the longitudinal arch and further strengthens the muscles. This may be repeated until the foot is fully corrected.

Although the invention hasbeen described setting forth a single specific embodiment thereof, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes in the details of construction may be made within the spirit of the invention. For instance, the material used in the pad need not be a soft deformable solid material, but may beair or other gas, or it may be a liquid, such as glycerine or -it may even be made of synthetic or other plastic materials. It is necessary that the material flow under foot pressure. The covering for the material need not be duck, but may be of various other materials, such as Waterproofed cloth orthe like. The scaphoid and heel portions 5 ould be of relatively stiff material, as also the cros bar and outer wedge. Many materials are suitable for the purpose, such as cork, leather, :felt and hard rubber. It is desirable that such .materials have some elasticity, but they should retain their form under the pressure of the feet.

These and other changes in the details of construction may be made within the spirit of the inventionand the invention is to be broadly construed and not to be limited except by the char- 1 ,cter of the claims appended hereto.

I claim:

1. An arch support comprising a flat base having the outline of a foot, a raised portion thereon in the scaphoid area extending rearwardly along the inner edge of the heel to the rear thereof, said base having a relatively narrow and fiat outer border wedge, the outer edge of said heel being lower than the inner edge, a flat metatarsal crossbar on said base having a central metatarsal excavation, a pad of displaceable deformable material on the central part of said base and resting on said outer wedge, said pad having a recess in the scaphoid area adjacent to said raised portion, said pad extending to the inner edge of said support, said pad being thickest at said inner edge and tapering to the Outer edge of said support, the thick portion of said pad overlying said crossbar at said metatarsal excavation.

2. An arch support comprising a flat base having the outline of a foot, a raised portion thereon in the scaphoid area extending rearwardly along the inner edge of the heel to the rear thereof, said base having a relatively narrow and flat outer border wedge, the outer edge of said heel being lower than the inner edge, a flat metatarsal crossbar on said base having a central metatarsal excavation, a .pad of displaceable deformable material on the central part of said base and resting on said outer wedge, said pad having a recess in the scaphoid area adjacent to said raised portion, said pad extending to the inner edge of said support, said pad being thickest at said inner edge and tapering to theouter edge of said support, the thick .portion of said pad overlying said crossbar at said metatarsal excavation, the inner and outer edges of said pad extending 'upwardly to partially embrace the foot of the wearer. V V

3. An arch support comprising a fiat base having the outline of a foot and extending along the :rear, outer edge and front only .of said support but not along the inner edge, a raised portion thereon in the scaphoid area extending rearwardly along the inner edge of the heel to the rear thereof, said base having a relatively narrow and flat outer border wedge, the outer edge of said heel being lower than the inner edge, a

fiat metatarsal crossbar on said base having a central metatarsal excavation, a padof displaceable deformable material on the central part of said base and resting on said outer wedge, said pad having a recess in the scaphoid area adjacent to said raised portion, said pad extending toi he inner edge of said support, said pad being thickest at said inner edgeand tapering to the outer edge of saidsupport, .the thick portion of said pad overlying said crossbar at said metatarsal excavation.

l. An arch support comprising a fiat base having the outline of a foot, a raised portion thereon in the scaphoid area extending rearwardly along said support, said had being thickest at said inner edge and tapering to the outer edg of s i support, the thick portion .of said pad overlying said crossbar at said metatarsal excavation, said Number pad being detachable from said base, and a cover 1,757,904 on said pad and base. 1,986,646 JEAN MATLAS. 2,074,286 a 5 2,081,474 REFERENCES CITED 2 3 5 11 The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS m Egg Number Name Date 497,744

1,717,968 Gartner June 18, 1929 Name Date Free May 6, 1930 Schade Jan. 1, 1935 Sullivan Mar. 16, 1937 Burns May 25, 1937 Ledermann Dec. 26, 1944 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date Australia Sept. 13, 1935 Great Britain Dec. 28, 1938

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1717968 *Aug 17, 1927Jun 18, 1929Robert J Campbell JrArch-supporting footwear
US1757904 *Sep 17, 1928May 6, 1930Free Chester ASelf-adjusting arch support
US1986646 *Feb 17, 1933Jan 1, 1935Schade AlfredFoot support
US2074286 *Dec 24, 1934Mar 16, 1937Charles SullivanAir cushion arch builder
US2081474 *Oct 23, 1935May 25, 1937William C BurnsCuboid-metatarsal arch support
US2366116 *Nov 17, 1943Dec 26, 1944Erwin S LedermanCorrective means for the human foot
AU2444035A * Title not available
GB497744A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2518033 *May 1, 1947Aug 8, 1950Wilbert LucasFoot corrective appliance
US3099267 *Jul 6, 1961Jul 30, 1963Earl L CherniakFoot balancing device
US3135265 *Jun 11, 1962Jun 2, 1964Universal Stay Company IncFoot cushioning device
US3407406 *Jun 14, 1965Oct 29, 1968Rosemount Eng Co LtdConformable pad and material for use therein
US5253435 *Aug 19, 1991Oct 19, 1993Nike, Inc.Pressure-adjustable shoe bladder assembly
US5257470 *Feb 19, 1991Nov 2, 1993Nike, Inc.Shoe bladder system
US5416988 *Apr 23, 1993May 23, 1995Nike, Inc.Customized fit shoe and bladder therefor
US5430960 *Oct 25, 1993Jul 11, 1995Richardson; Willie C.Lightweight athletic shoe with foot and ankle support systems
US5765298 *Mar 12, 1993Jun 16, 1998Nike, Inc.Athletic shoe with pressurized ankle collar
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/153
International ClassificationA43B7/14
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/1435, A43B7/1445, A43B7/141, A43B7/14, A43B7/142, A43B7/1425
European ClassificationA43B7/14A10, A43B7/14A20A, A43B7/14A20B, A43B7/14A20M, A43B7/14A20F, A43B7/14