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Publication numberUS2440042 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 20, 1948
Filing dateMar 4, 1947
Priority dateMar 4, 1947
Publication numberUS 2440042 A, US 2440042A, US-A-2440042, US2440042 A, US2440042A
InventorsErnest Friedman
Original AssigneeErnest Friedman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Indicating system for baseball games
US 2440042 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1948. E. FRIEDMAN 2,440,042

INDICATING SYSTEM FOR BASEBALL GAMES Filed March 4, 1947 2 Sheets-Sheet l j INVENTOR. .EQNEST F 12 mum/41v April 20, 1948. E. FRIEDMAN 2,440,042

INDICATING SYSTEM FOR BASEBALL GAMES Filed March 4, 1947 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. [SQ/VEST FR/EDMAA/ A 7 mkggr Patented Apr. 20, 1948 fom'rrzo STATES PATENT orricr.

INDICATING SYSAILIiM FOR BASEBALL Ernest Friedman, New York, N. Y.

Application March 4, 1947, Serial No. 732,249

8 Claims. (Cl. 177-384) This invention relates to baseball games and the like.

An object of the invention is to provide a baseball game having bases which are so constructed and arranged as to indicate positively when a player has a foot on the base.

Another object of the invention is to provide a base for use in playing baseball games and the like, which base is electrified in such a manner that contact therewith by a player will be indicated in a positive visible or audible manner.

A further object of the invention is to provide a baseball base associated with electric lights operable by means of switches contained in the base, the switches being differentially arranged so as to be selectively responsive to magnets contained in theshoes of the players in such a manner that when the shoe of the baseman touches the base one light is illuminated, whereas when the shoe of the runner touches the same base another light is illuminated, thus giving a visual and positive indication as to which player is in contact with the base.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a baseball game and the bases thereof, in which the possibility of error by umpires in determining whether a runner is safe or out, is minimized or substantially eliminated.

Another object of the invention is to provide an electrified base for use in playing baseball, which is simple in design, inexpensive to manufacture, operable by magnetic devices carried in the shoes of the players, and which is positive in operation and safe for use.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description of a preferred embodiment thereof as illustrated in the accompanying drawings, and in which,

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a baseball playing field showing the bases and home plate thereof with adjacent indicating lights, according to the invention,

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of one of the bases according to the invention, the view being broken out to show the interior construction thereof,

Fig. 3 is an enlarged sectional view, partly in elevation, taken on line 3-3 of Fig. 2,

Fig. 4 is a schematic wiring diagram of the electric circuits involved in construction and operation of the base and indicating lights,

Fig. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of a portion of the base shown in Figs. 2 and ;3 and illustrating in detail one of the actuating switches thereof,

'Fig. 6 is a bottom plan view of one of the shoes which the player is out;

Fig. 8 is a view of an incident in a game in which the player is indicated as safe; and

Fig. 9 is a view similar to Fig. 8 but illustrating another incident in a game.

In the course of baseball games a frequent source of contention on the part of the spectators and players is the question as to whether the base runner is out or safe. Thus, when a man at bat has hit the ball and runs to first base, if the ball is caught by the first baseman before the runner reaches first base and places his foot thereon, then the runner is out. It is consequently of importance to determine, in a close case, whether the runner has placed his foot on first base before the first baseman has caught the ball and simultaneously put his foot on the base.

Depending upon the rules of the baseball game, it is similarly of importance in other instances to determine the relative timing relationship of when the basemans foot, and the runners foot, touch the base, in order to determine whether the man is safe or out, this also applying to home plate. It is apparent that if the question of whether the runners or the basemans foot touches the base first is visually determined, then the umpires job is rendered that much easier for it is then only necessary for him to visually observe the position of the ball itself, thus limiting the number of variables which must instantaneously be observed by the umpire to one instead of three as heretofore. This renders more certain and less open to dispute the decisions of the umpires in baseball games, It is noted that the relative placing of the runners and basemans feet on the base is clearly visually indicated to all the fans in the ball stadium, thereby permitting them to check on the umpires decisions.

The present invention discloses a proposed solution of this vexing problem. In order to understand clearly the nature of the invention and the means by which it may be carried out. Itference may now be had to the drawings, in which like reference characters denote similar p a r t s throughout the several views. As best shown in Fig. 1, there is a diamond-shaped baseball playing field laid out in the usual fashion as prescribed by the rules of the game therefor, there being a home plate in, first base I2, second base 14, and third base IS, the pitcher being shown at the pitchers box I 8 as he throws the pitched ball substantially along the line 20 toward the batter who stands substantially in front of the home plate 10.

A baseman is stationed at each base, and the catcher is similarly stationed at the home plate, other players such as the short stop, infield and outfield players being disposed about on the playing field to intercept the batted ball.

The bases and the home plate according to my fine a hollow base housing having an interior 5 s'witch ll e111,

chamber 28, The housing platform 30 and side walls 26 are made of a relatively rigid material which may be cast, moldedfor otherwise conveniently formed of non-magnetic material. The walls so and 26 of the said housing are pro 1 vided with a relatively large numben ofspac'ed bores 32 as best shown inFigI-fi'; th bores extending from the outer surface 34 ofthe house to its inner surface 36, each bore being' redu'ed whwards therefrom fas'fshown ntheview, the plunger {42 is in its lowermost position.

upper end portion a t t oflthellower redu e-wbor' 'sagfis securely *iastened to the lower' end or the'pidnger'snank "i 14: the" "disc' being -e1ectric'a'11y' 6onneetea to-the "*"lead wire 48.

u'rBD to 'reeei'veamagnet '62 which is secured at? 'lowe' end 'poition in a recess? formed. in -t1 e' upper end 'si i rtaee 'ofthe" movable plunger-42.

The Walls :o f'the housing thus'have a large numagnet,'ahd' eachhaving stationaryhontactsi52 and movable contacts idfoiining' a switch" .64

hic maybe closed wheh'the'plungeriselevated irlleviatienjjof the" plun er to *clo'se the switch is"5 -ae gcmpiished "by applying a" magnetic force to tHefifiaQn et'BZ 'to draw it upwards into" the bore 50 Ineis'inliclfi s' theifillustrati on"in'Figj5 shows the fibs itive pole of theifiaen'et uppermost'; it is arent bringing" the h'e'gaitive' pole of 'a'n'-"" 5 iflaf'gi-iet into ziroxinei-ty"tothe'positive pole tern magnet 62 wm'eause it to 'be attracted thertdafid henceelevated-closin the switch.

The diitEr SurfaCe-"M of 'the housingimaybe metere with; sheet "material .66 "in" the nature of 6 "waterprooffcanvasf or"le'a2ther' to' form aisealing Sheet to"ke'e'p outrain'and moisture, andithis is iiove'iedby'alfdlimf fabric sheet 68 of soft hoclijabsorbing material suc'li as' felt, in order p protect "theplayers from fany injuries which 6 ifght result from 'sudden c'ollisio'n "therewith.

I heWi'reS48"and'54l are" connectedi ina circuit including "an' indicator lamp "'1' ll and: a source' of electrical power such as a batter at 12, orany fother suitable source offel'ectric'alsenergyfsd that 7 etest-rig "of the"sw'itc'h $45 will al ght the" lam "m *whichmayb'e coloredred; The nexvbore 32, in {the housing may have its, magnet inverted with its negative fpole uppei'miistfim orderfioiclosefits x' plungei :"actuatedswitch' 14" ivhen'th positive 7 d "with its re-i; 2

' adiai nete'r greater than The; bi c it? is breviaedfyvitn electrical con-T1 springs; has'its' lower endb'earing r iaree be 40; The plug-BB'hasah axiaiapere 4 pole of an outside magnet is brought near it, the plunger and switch contacts being otherwise igi nidcal ..w it h the arr angement shown in Fig. 5. j lfdweyeij'litiwilll be notedlj frfc'mi Fig.1}, that the when closdfausefthe other lamp 16 to be illuminated, the latter lamp being otherwise colored, such as, for example, reen to disffoiiflainp 10.

All of the magnetic switch units shown in Figs. 0 2 ll. 3,--.and .5; are preferably alternately oppositely polari'zedfTherefore, in accordance with my invention, the saidfswitch units may be selectively actuated by providing the baseman 18 with shoes "having "negatively oriented magnetic buttons 80 on the soles and heels and alsoalongtheedges 82 of the sole's and heels, "whereby as' the baseman places his shoe in contact with any pa rt of the has'e'fat least one ofth' positively oriented magnlets-shown in Fig. e 'w n hell attracted --thereby 6 and'erawrriipwareg to close a switch" GfL thereby illuminating the fed indicator-lamp 10, alongside ftheh'ase. v Similarly, in "accordance With my: invention,- it 11's 'r'ifit ed v that if i the' opposing' team runher 8 4' is providedwithTshoes "-theiiragnetm buttons" 80' of are positively"oliehted-toattract the nega- "tive'ly oriented? mag-net's "i the recesses "of the 'pluhg ers; tl'leriucontact of his .shoevwiththe base will actuate at least "one iof the switches :14 to i nmmmatthe greenlampffli. Referring now to "the-situations" depicted-in FigSj-..'Z-, 8. and;9,;;itlwi1l 'beseen -that in Fig; flf'the :baseman .:I8f.-has this i foot on the base;' iHhminatingLtheJampJB afirst, viihereas the ,other lamp J0. remains unlighted since the runner 84' has note/yet touched; the base I with his 'fQ01;.. I' 'Sinc'e the la'mpi'l 6,, is; already. 11- 'luminate-di and the. ball isshown. .asijustv being caught by the baseman, it is alclearfindication to v I the .--un'ip'ire and spectators" that the runner is "'bub 'f QM i.- a"; e n-41m. w

In FigflgS; both lampsilo aiidljfiag'eplighted, indicating that both thezfirst baseman andthe runner have Itheirffee't. on". the bas'e'aandth eumpire must :rule "thatethe runner is safe osiucie'ithe, ball has notiyet' reached the glove ;of ,thebaseman. 153F113; 9 illustratesa situationiwhere therunner 84is' slidin'gfeet' first into;- the base. jByjjthe fact that the lam T0; is; lighted; the umpire ;can'i see that the runners foot has touchedv'thec-basevde- 0 "spi'tethe cloud; ofudustvl Itis. obvious to: the umipire andto"the" 'spectatdrs-that the runner is safe. r l o. It is. thus seen that use :of :my i'rnpr'oved indicator device at each base and the homeIplate, e asdescrihed simplifies the. work of .theumpires enabliiigthm and'th'e audienceitoisee instantrly which player:touches the? base. first "and 'allows them to give more attention to the positionof the balllitselfw l. l ,l a. a 0 """Although Ihavei'describedi-a preferredlembodinientoffmy invention in'specifidtermsdt: iszto: be "understoodithat rvai'iouschariges may. be made in size, shape, lliiatierials"and arrangement; without .departingjrom'thespirit and scope of the inven- 5"-'tionias"claimed..

Having id'es cribed" iinventiomiw'hat I i claim and desire toz'secur'e by Letters; Patent is; y t 11. A'baseball; game device. comprising Fa pair of :Vindicatorfnembers, the first oiwhichi's' different 0 from the second, a base housing, a fi'rstplurality of normally openswitch'es tdi'sp'osed inisai'd'. base 7 housing andoperati'v'ely connected; ;to; said first indicator memberfandsto aisou'rce of. powerxlfor T actuatingesaidefii'stiiindicators memberi aQSecond 5 plurality of nonnally'fopenswitchesdisposed in said base housing and connected to said second indicator member and to a source of power for actuating said second indicator member, and magnetic means carried jointly by said housing and by a baseman for actuating said first indicator member upon contact with the base by the baseman, and magnetic means carried jointly by said housing and by a base runner for actuating said second indicator member upon contact with the base by the base runner.

2. A baseball game device comprising a pair of lights the first of which is of one color and the second of which is of a difierent color, a base housing, a first plurality of normally open switches carried by said base housing and connected to a source of power and to said first light, a second plurality of normally open switches carried by said base housing and connected to a source of power and to said second light, said first plurality of switches being magnetically polarized in one direction, oppositely polarized magnets carried on the shoes of the baseman for actuating at least one of said first plurality of switches to illuminate said first light upon contact of the basemans shoe with the base housing, said second plurality of switches being magnetically polarized in a direction opposite to that of the first plurality of switches, magnets carried on the shoes of the base runner which are polarized oppositely to said second plurality of switches for actuating at least one of said second plurality of switches to illuminate said second light upon contact of the base runners shoe with the base housing.

3. A baseball game device comprising a pair of lights the first of which is of one color and the second of which is of a difierent color, a, base housing including an inner casing, a first plurality of positively polarized normally open magnetic switches in said casing and connected to the first of said lights and to a source of electric power, a second plurality of negatively polarized normally open magnetic switches in said casing and connected to the second of said lights and to a source of electric power, shoes wearable by the base man and having negatively polarized magnetic bodies on the soles and heels thereof for actuating at least one of said second plurality of switches to illuminate the second light upon con tact of said shoe with the base housing.

4. The construction of claim 3 in which said inner casing has a plurality of spaced apertures formed therein for the reception of one of said magnetic switches in each aperture.

5. The construction of claim 3 in which said inner casing has a plurality of spaced apertures formed therein for the reception of one of said magnetic switches in each aperture, said positively and negatively polarized switches being intermingled in their disposition about the area of said inner casing.

6. The construction of claim 3 in which said inner casing has a plurality of spaced apertures formed therein for the reception of one of said magnetic switches in each aperture, said positively and negatively polarized switches being intermingled in their disposition about the area of the said inner casing, a weather protective Coating layer disposed upon the outer surface of said inner casing, and a yielding relatively soft outer layer disposed upon the outer surface of said weather protective coating layer to protect said players against injuries due to sudden collision therewith. I

'7. The construction of claim 1 in which said base housing comprises an inner casing of relatively stiff material, a weatherproof sealing sheet layer disposed over said inner casing, and an outer layer disposed over said sealing sheet layer and formed of relatively soft yielding material.

8. A baseball game device comprising a pair of lights, the first of which is of one color and the second of which is of a difierent color, a base housing formed of an inner casing made of relatively stifi material, a weatherproof intermediate coating layer disposed over said inner casing, and a relatively soft yielding outer layer of material disposed over said intermediate coating layer, said inner casing having a plurality of bores formed therein, a plurality of downwardly spring biased plungers movably disposed in some of said bores and carrying movable electrical contacts thereon, magnets securely carried on the upper end portions of said plungers, stationary contacts carried by and insulated from said inner casing for forming with said movable contacts a, normally open switch, a first pluralit of said magnets being positively polarized and having their switches connected to a source of power and'to the first of said lights, a second plurality of said magnets being negatively polarized and having their switches connected to a source of power and to the second of said lights, basemens shoes having negatively polarized magnetic bodies for actuating at least one of said positively polarized first plurality of switches to illuminate said first light upon contact of. the shoe with the base housing, and base runners shoes having positively polarized magnetic bodies for actuating at least one of said negatively polarized second plurality of switches to illuminate said second light upon contact of the shoe with the base housing.

ERNEST FRIEDMAN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,458,180 Hammond June 12, 1923 2,427,213 Jewell Sept. 9, 1947

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1458180 *Jun 1, 1916Jun 12, 1923Hammond Jr John HaysAdvertising device
US2427213 *Oct 12, 1945Sep 9, 1947Gen ElectricLinear motion transmitter or receiver
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2595769 *Jul 5, 1947May 6, 1952Maurice J NoregaardMagnet operated switch
US2804518 *Oct 25, 1954Aug 27, 1957Thompson Wendell LMagnetic switch
US3091454 *Mar 29, 1962May 28, 1963Joney SamSounding game mat
US3191935 *Jul 2, 1962Jun 29, 1965Brunswick CorpPin detection means including electrically conductive and magnetically responsive circuit closing particles
US4723779 *Apr 5, 1982Feb 9, 1988Hauser Michael ABase with tapered sides
US5401016 *May 18, 1993Mar 28, 1995Heglund; Kenneth W.Automatic baseball ball and strike indicator
US6179734Jul 14, 1999Jan 30, 2001Bryan J. BravardBall game method of play and base
US6688996 *Dec 18, 2002Feb 10, 2004Shigeto MitaniBaseball home plate with laser beams arrangement
US7270616 *Jan 14, 2003Sep 18, 2007Snyder Arthur CBatter monitoring system
US7476165 *Oct 10, 2006Jan 13, 2009Gb Sports, LlcGame base system
US8702099 *Aug 1, 2011Apr 22, 2014M & C Innovations, LlcLight-up shuffleboard equipment
US8764592Jul 29, 2011Jul 1, 2014M & C Innovations, LlcLight-up shuffleboard equipment
US20120025459 *Aug 1, 2011Feb 2, 2012Matthew Alexander VanderbergLight-up shuffleboard equipment
Classifications
U.S. Classification315/76, 473/101, 340/323.00R, 273/455, 200/16.00R, 473/500
International ClassificationA63B69/00, A63B71/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/0013, A63B71/0605
European ClassificationA63B71/06B, A63B69/00B2