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Publication numberUS2440362 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 27, 1948
Filing dateJul 25, 1944
Priority dateJul 25, 1944
Publication numberUS 2440362 A, US 2440362A, US-A-2440362, US2440362 A, US2440362A
InventorsWalter Braun
Original AssigneeWalter Braun
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Slip lasted shoe with tucked in heel cover, and method
US 2440362 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

prilZ', 1948. r w, BRAUN 2,440,362

SLIP LASTED SHOE wITH TUCKED IN HEEL COVER AND METHOD Filed July 25, 1944 2 shets-sheet 1 INVENTOR v ATTORNEY.

Aprl- 27, 1948.

W. BRAUN SLIP LASTED SHOE WITH TUCKED IN HEEL COVER AND METHOD Filed July 25, 1944 2 Sheets-Sheet. 2

Wmrge QQ/10N,

INVENTOR ATTORN EY.

Patented Apr. 27, 1948 UNITED ks'rn'rlzs PAT-ENT 'foFfFl-CE sur `'LAs'rED SHOE WITH'frUoKED 1N t covert, AND METHOD Walter Braun, `Los Angeles, Calif. Aimplication July 25, 1944, 'Serial No. 546,455

s claims. (o1. 3e-'34,.)

This invention relates to the manufacture ofA heel which is covered.

The prior art discloses shoe construction and methods in which an upper is stitched to a `sock lining insole, to which sock lining a Aplatform cover is stitched all the Vway around. The shoe is then put on the last, and a platform usually comprising a cushioning Vpad and a heel raise are laid over the bottom of the sock lining, the platform cover is then pulled over and cemented down against the lower surface of the platform, and an outsole is then attached to the bottom of the platform. This process is satisfactory with most low heel shoes or with certain high heel shoes in which the heels are not beveled.

In higher heel shoes of this general design wherein the heels arebeveled, the process has had to be altered and the shoe construction 'consequently different. The reason for this is that when sewing a platform cover to the insole on a high heel or even a medium high heel shoe this cover must be full enough around to take in the last before turning back over the edge of the platform, whereupon after the turning there is too much material in the heel portion of the cover to allow lasting it over the heel Without Wrinkles. On the other hand, if the 'platform cover, considering the platform as combined heel raise and pad, is cut small enough to make a neat fit over the heel by avoiding fullness of material, such a platform cover when turned up around the upper prior to lasting will not permit the last to enter the shoe.

Consequently, manufacturers have heretofore used on beveled higher heel shoes a separate narrow pad cover stitched to the sock lining but only wide enough to fold over the edge of the pad itself and be secured to the lower surface of the pad. The heel raise was covered separately in a conventional manner and attached by cement to the covered felt pad.

Such a method'and construction suffers the disadvantages of: (l) added cost consisting of the regular cost of lasting the pad cover under the felt pad plus the cost of covering the heel raise; (2) an interrupted line which is unfiattering to the heel; (3) the bond between the heel raise and the cover pad is unreliable as it can be done with cement only and quite often the rolling movements of the foot tear open the bond between the heel raise and the pad. It is obvious that inthe type of shoe under discussion the heel cannot be nailed to the upper, because the upper Y -2 Acontains nothing to nail to except the sock lining, only the V,cushioning -pad being interposed 'between the sock lining and ftheheel raise, which pad 4is not suflciently stable to furnish a good 4nail seat. It is an object of .my 4inventionto produce a slip "lasted shoegwith `a platform `cover for Athe .combined pad andheel raise similar to the construction employed 4on 'aloWer or unbeveled heel shoe, but improved for adaptation to a beveled `higher heel shoe, by; forming aslit or .slits inthe 'back portion of lthe heel lift, utilizing a platform cover full lenoug'haround the heel Ato `enable the shoe to bereadily slipped. on the last when ethe cover is turned back Laround the upper, and after wiping the `cover over the ,platform rdisposing of the excess leather or fabric which cannot be lasted :because of its fullness by drawing it 'into the slit ,in the sheel lift.

By this method vand construction I have achieved: (1.) the sa'me Vdurable and reliablebond between insole or sock lining and heel raise as on A'alow heelshoe of the prior construction, as both pad and heel raise are coveredas a single unit by asingle combined pad and heel cover joined `at the upper vedgeto the 'sock lining and lasted down over the `side of the combined .pad and heel and attached to the lower surface Aof the combined Apad and heel platform unit; (2) an uninterrupted Vfrom the pad, Yor it maybe the heel portion of a platform having an integralpad and heel platform construction, 'or a laminated construction.

[The objects and advantages indicated and others will more fully appear from a considera tion of the description which follows taken in conjunction with the drawings.

4In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of a shoe embodying Vour construction wit-h'parts in cross section.

Figure 2 is a fragmentary horizontal cross section at the heel taken on the line 2-2 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a bottom plan View of our shoe with vpart of the outsole cut away.

Figure 4 is a side elevation of the shoe on the last prior to turning the platform cover over the platform.

Figure is a view similar to figure 4 showing the platform Vcover turned over the platform and partially wiped over the heel Wedge.

Figure 6 is a rear end elevation of the comtion.

Figure 7 is a view similar to figure 6 of a modified construction embodying two slits in the heel.

Figure 8 is a view similar to figures 5 and 6' embodying a modified construction employing two slits in the heel.

Figure 8 is a view similar to figures 5 and 6 embodying a modified construction employing three slits in the heel.

Figure 9 is a view similar to figure 1 embodying our invention in a scoop wedge type of heel construction.

Figure 10 is a similar view illustrating the invention in a Dutch heel construction.

Referring to Figures 1 to 8, the completed shoe I embodying my invention comprises an upper I I and a sock lining insole I2 both stitched to a platform cover I3, the sock lining being stitched to the cover all the way around. The upper illustrated is by way of example only, as any other form or pattern of upper may be employed, and if it is a closedtoe type of upper the upper itself would be stitched to the sock lining all the way around. The platform cover I3 encloses a platform I4 which includes a cushioning pad I and a wedge heel raise I 6. The shoe is completed by an outsole I1.

The upper, sock lining, and platform cover are cut and stitched together prior to lasting, and in a manner so that when the cover is turned over the platform the stitching is concealed. The parts thus assembled are then put on the last I8 and the platform spotted to the bottom of the sock lining, `preferably cemented thereto.

The platform preferably includes the cushioning pad I5 overlying the wedge heel raise I6, the twoelem-ents being cemented together or stapled'together or secured in any other convement manner, either before assembly in the shoe, Vor as separate steps in assembling the platform elements in the shoe. As an alternative construction, the wedgeheel raise may be superimposed above the cushioning pad, or the pad and wedge heel raise may be made in an integral form, either solid or laminated, or the heel may be a separate element meeting the pad at about the break of the shoe.

The heel portion of the platform is relatively high and is beveled from the top down to impart a narrowing effect. The toe portion of the platform is preferably of a cushioning material, such as felt, sisal, cork, etc., and the heel portion may be the same in whole or in part, but the wedge heel raise will normally be wood, cork, composition rubber, etc. The choice of material is not part of the present invention.

The heel raise I6 is formed with a substantially vertical slit 20 extending from a point 2l near the upper surface of the heel raise inwardly to a point 22 a substantial distance forward at the lower surface of the heel raise, such points being joined by a diagonal cut 23. In the form illustrated theslit is quite narrow, being intended only to accommodate with a frictional engagement a double thickness of the platform cover I3. However, the width and design of the slit 20 may vary according to the design of the shoe, so long as it provides a recess for the reception of a folded-in portion 24 of the platform cover in the heel area. The form of slit illustrated offers complementary spaced surfaces 25 a-nd 26. The depth of the slit may vary according to the quantity of platform cover to be tucked in which in turn is controlled by the form of the last and the shape of the heel.

The platform cover may be made in one piece of fabric, leather, or other sheet material all the way around, as illustrated, or it may be made in two or more pieces. In any event it will normally have at least one overlapping joint as at 21. It must be deep enough to provide for a marginal turned in portion 28 under the toe and a portion 29 to be turned in under the heel. Around the heel it must be full enough to be folded back over the lasted upper, as'illustrated in Figure 4, during certain stages of manufacture. When the assembled upper, sock lining and platform cover are first mounted on the last the cover will be turned in the position illustrated in Figure 4 to facilitate placement of the platform on the shoe.

Assuming that the platform has been located on the bottom face of the sock lining and preferably secured thereto by cement in the relationship illustrated in Figure 4, the platform cover is'then turned over the edge of the platform and the toe portion of the cover pulled in and cemented to the bottom surface of the cushioning pad I5.

The next step in the present process is to pull the heel portion of the platform cover close in and wipe the platform cover to the sides of the heel division of the platform, leaving the marginal portion 29 to be cemented to the bottom of the heel region of the platform, and leaving the extreme rear with the fullness 30 gathered, as in Figure 5.

The next step is to tuck the fullness 35 of the heel platform cover into the slit 25 by any suitable thin instrument or blade, not illustrated. The slit is deep enough so that the fullness may be tucked in to the required degree in order to snugly wipe the cover in against the heel, and the loose marginal edge material 29 of the cover may be pressed down and cemented to the bottom surface of the heel, resulting in the construction illustrated in Figure 3, wherein a cover crease 3l appears externally of the heel.

The shoe is then completed by cementing or otherwise securing the outsole I'I to the bottom surface of the covered platform.

Instead of a single slit at the heel I may employ a plurality of slits with cover creases Sla, as illustrated in Figures 7 and 8. Other variations within the scope of the invention will be obvious. For example, the slits may be modified by widening the spacing and converging the walls forwardly providing either a V shaped or curved horizontal cross section.

In the modified form illustrated in Figure 9, a scoop wedge heel 50 comprises a wedge raise 5I extending forward to the break of the shoe as in Figure l, but formed with a scooped arch 52. The arch is treated as part of the bottom of the platform in wiping the cover over the platform, and the outsole follows the arch. Otherwise, the construction and method are the same as already described.

Figure 10 illustrates the invention in a Dutch heel type of shoe, wherein a heel @El comprises a raise 6I terminating at about the waist 52 of the shoe, leaving an arch 63 to be supported by a shank 54 under the pad 65, which shank may seat in a recess 55 in the top of the heel lift, and be feathered at the ball as at 6l. The outsole 68 follows the contour of the arch as illustrated, Vcontacting the forward portion of the pad, the forward portion of the shank, and

the forward edge and the bottom of the heel raise.

Although I have herein shown and described my invention in what I have conceived to be the most practical and preferred embodiment, it is recognized that departures may be made therefrom within the scope of my invention, which is not to be limited to the details disclosed herein but is to be accorded the full scope of the claims so as to embrace any and all equivalent structures and methods. The invention is not usually necessary to, but can be employed in, the manufacture of low heel shoes, or non-beveled high heel shoes. It is applicable to any slip lasted shoe, whether the platform cover is a separate piece stitched to the upper or is integral with either the upper or insole.

Having described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. In the art of producing a slip lasted shoe wherein an upper and a sock lining insole are stitched together and a heel cover of sheet material is also stitched to the sock lining and upper before lasting, the improvement which comprises utilizing a heel cover fuller around than the side contour of the heel to enable the cover when turned over the upper to accommodate the last and thereby facilitate placement of the heel against the lower surface of the sock lining, providing a heel having a substantially vertical slit in its rear position, and fitting the cover snugly over the heel by wiping the cover around the sides of the heel and tucking surplus heel cover material into said slit.

2. In the art of producing shoes wherein a heel is covered with sheet material, the improvement which comprises utilizing a heel cover fuller around than the side contour of the heel, providing a heel having a substantially vertical slit in its rear portion, and fitting the cover snugly over the heel by wiping the cover around the sides of the heel and tucking surplus heel cover material into said slit.

v3. In the art of producing shoes wherein a heel is covered with sheet material, the improvement which comprises utilizing a heel cover fuller around than the side contour of the heel, providing a heel having a substantially vertical slit in an exterior vertical portion thereof, and iltting the cover snugly over the heel by wiping the cover around the sides of the heel and tucking surplus heel cover material into said slit, the inside surface of said cover being coated with adhesive prior to tucking whereby the coated surface of said cover is caused to adhere to the walls of said slit.

4. In the art of producing a slip lasted shoe wherein an upper and a sock lining insole are stitched together and a heel cover of sheet material is also stitched to the sock lining and upper before lasting, the improvement which comprises utilizing a heel cover fuller around than the side contour of the heel to enable the cover when turned over the upper to accommodate the last to facilitate placement of the heel against the lower surface of the sock lining, providing a heel having a substantially vertical slit in its rear portion, and fitting the cover snugly over the heel by wiping the cover around the sides of the heel and tucking surplus heel cover material into said slit, the inside surface of said cover being coated with adhesive prior to tucking whereby the coated surface of said cover is caused to adhere to the walls of said slit.

5. In the art of producing a slip lasted shoe wherein the heel is a relatively high beveled wedge type and an upper and a sock lining insole are stitched together and a heel wedge cover of sheet material is also secured to the sock lining and upper before lasting, the improvement which comprises utilizing a heel cover fuller around than the side contour of the heel to enable the cover when turned over the upper to accommodate the last to facilitate placement of the heel against the lower surface of the sock lining, providing a heel having a substantially vertical slit in its rear portion, and fitting the cover snugly over the heel by wiping the cover around the sides of the heel and tucking surplus heel cover material into said slit.

6. A heel for a shoe comprising a generally wedge type heel raise, said heel raise being formed with a substantially vertical slit commencing at a point spaced from the top of said heel raise cut in from the surface thereof which is on the outside of the shoe said slit being of increasing depth towards the bottom of said heel raise, and a single, continuous cover of sheet material over the outside surface of said heel raise fitted snugly thereto, said cover having an original fullness around its lower portion greater than the surface to be covered, and a tuck of the unbroken area of said cover forced into said slit to remove surplus and improve the fit of said cover on said heel raise.

'1. A covered heel for a shoe comprising a beveled type heel raise formed with a substantially vertical fiat walled recess extending in from the outside and of uniformly increasing depth towards its lower end, and a unitary cover of sheet material having an original excess fullness around and a marginal excess at the lower edge, said cover being snugly adhered to said heel raise and the fit of said cover completed by drawing the excess material forced into said recess and the forced in material cemented uncut to the walls of said recess, and the marginal excess of the lower edge cemented to the bottom surface of the heel raise.

8. A covered heel for a shoe comprising a tapered heel raise formed with a substantially vertical flat walled recess extending in from the outside and diagonally from the rear of the heel raise of increasing depth forwardly and downwardly, and a cover of sheet material having an original excess fullness around definable in a substantially triangular pattern foldable on a vertical center line from the apex of the triangle, said cover fitted tightly over said heel raise with a snug adhesion thereto and the fit of said cover improved by having the excess material forced into said recess.

WALTER BRAUN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date D. 94,046 Nutt Dec, 11, 1934 D. 125,895 Keyes Mar. 18, 1941 1,713,177 Nutt June 18, 1929 1,738,715 Marshall Dec. 10, 1929 1,761,359 Nutt June 3, 1930 1,849,247 Nutt Mar. 15, 1932 2,314,205 rorscnner Mar. 16, 1943 2,341,676 Walsh Feb. 15, 1944 2,348,952 Braun May 16, 1944 24,362,639 .Knight Nov. 14, 1944

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1718177 *Aug 31, 1927Jun 18, 1929United Shoe Machinery CorpHeel covering
US1738715 *Aug 29, 1928Dec 10, 1929Mound City Wood Heel & Mfg CoShoe heel
US1761359 *Oct 16, 1929Jun 3, 1930United Shoe Machinery CorpHeel and method of covering the same
US1849247 *Oct 1, 1929Mar 15, 1932United Shoe Machinery CorpHeel
US2314205 *Feb 13, 1942Mar 16, 1943Vilem ForschnerShoe
US2341676 *Apr 6, 1942Feb 15, 1944Penaljo IncShoe and process of making the same
US2348952 *Jul 21, 1941May 16, 1944Walter BraunShoe or similar article
US2362639 *Dec 12, 1942Nov 14, 1944United Shoe Machinery CorpShoe
USD94046 *Oct 16, 1934Dec 11, 1934 Design for a shoe heel
USD125895 *Dec 7, 1940Mar 18, 1941 Wedge heel for shoes and slippers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2748405 *Dec 29, 1953Jun 5, 1956United Shoe Machinery CorpMethods of making slip-lasted shoes
US2946140 *Oct 24, 1957Jul 26, 1960Craddock Terry Shoe CorpShoe
US4048732 *Mar 11, 1976Sep 20, 1977The United States Shoe CorporationShoe and method of making the same
US4073024 *Mar 4, 1977Feb 14, 1978The United States Shoe CorporationMethod of making a shoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/34.00B, 12/146.00B, 12/147.00B, 12/142.00F, 36/19.5, 12/147.00R
International ClassificationA43B23/00, A43B23/08, A43B9/00, A43B9/14, A43B21/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B23/08, A43B9/14, A43B21/00
European ClassificationA43B9/14, A43B21/00, A43B23/08