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Publication numberUS2441812 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 18, 1948
Filing dateAug 12, 1946
Priority dateAug 12, 1946
Publication numberUS 2441812 A, US 2441812A, US-A-2441812, US2441812 A, US2441812A
InventorsHaffner Louis D
Original AssigneeHaffner Louis D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric prodder
US 2441812 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 18, 1948. D. HAFFNER 2,441,812

ELECTRIC PRODDER Filed Aug. 12; 1946 40 FIG. 2.

I J)l 58 23/ 34 (55 FIG.\. 29 22 9 INVENTOR- LOUIS D. HAFFNER ATTORNEYS.

Patented May 18, 1948 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ELECTRIC PRODDER Louis D. Hafiner, St. Louis, Mo.

Application August 12, 1946, Serial No. 689,900

5 Claims. 1

This invention relates to electric prodders of the type employed for prodding livestock.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide an electric prodder having means for impressing a voltage upon an electrode or a plurality of electrodes designed for contact with the .animal, but having means for varying the impressed voltage.

Further objects will appear from the detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view illustrating an embodiment of this invention;

Figure 2 is a View showing the electrical connections; and

Figures 3, 4 and 5 are views similar to Figure 2, illustrating other embodiments of this invention.

Generally stated, and in accordance with an illustrative embodiment of this invention, the electric prodder for livestock comprises a pole, a livestock contacting electrode or electrodes on the pole adapted for connection to a source of electric current, whereby a shock may be impressed upon the livestock, and selective means carried by the pole and in circuit with the electrode or electrodes for controlling the shock delivered to the livestock. The electrode or electrodes and the associated means are as usual mounted on a pole which may be in the form of a casing or housing from which the electrode or electrodes project and in which are housed the associated means. Where the casing or housing is of metal it is preferably grounded by a suitable connection.

Referring now to Figures 1 and 2, I designates a casing which may be of metal, at one end of which is arranged a block 2 of insulating mat. rial, such as fiber, in which are fixed a pair of electrodes 3 of a suitable metal, the end of the block being chamfered, as shown at 4, to project beyond the casing in order to shorten the electrodes. The other end of the casing has a block 5, also of insulating material through which the leads 5 and l pass and in which may also be mounted a fuse receptacle 8 provided with a removable fuse holder 9. The blocks 2 and 5 may be secured in the ends of the casing by screws l passing through the casing and threaded into the blocks. The block is provided with a metal strip H attached to a lead l2 and this strip may be provided with a perforation in order to form a hanger. The leads 6, 1 and I2 may be arranged in a suitable flexible insulating covering l3 of flexible form and of the required length. Leads 6 and 'l are connected to a suitable plug l4 provided with contacts l5, while the lead I2 may be connected to a suitable ground clamp It. It will be understood that the strip H contacts with the casing I when the block 5 is in place.

Arranged within the casing is a base or strip 20 of insulating material, such as fiber. Lead 1 is connected to a switch 2i of the push button type, the button being shown at 22. From the switch a lead 23 is connected to one of the electrodes 3 by a nut 24 engaging a washer 25. The switch is mounted on the base 20 with its push button 22 projecting through the casing, this push button being of the type in which it is depressed against the action of a spring (not shown) to close the circuit so that upon release of the button the circuit will be open.

From the fuse receptacle 8 a lead 25 passes underneath a clamp 21 and then to a central terminal 23 of a voltage selector having a manipulative handle 29 outside of the casing and provided with .a pointer having, as shown in Figure 1, four positions, namely, off, 1, 2 and 3. This selector has a contact member 30 adapted to contact with a series of contacts 3|, 32, 33 and 34 on sub base 35 mounted on the base 20 and corresponding to the position off, 1, 2, and 3 respectively. Contact 32 is connected to a resistance 36 of high value, viz., 25,000 ohms, contact 33 is connected to a resistance 31 of lower value, viz., 5,000 ohms and contact 34 is connected to a lead 38 of substantially zero resistance. The resistances 36 and 31 and the lead 38 connect to a lead 39 passing under a clamp All on the base and connected to the other electrode 3 through a washer 4| and a clamping nut 42.

In the embodiments shown in Figures 1 and 2, the electric prodder is designed to be connected to a source of alternating current by plugging in a lamp circuit of, say volts. Upon depression of the push button 22, the circuit including the electrodes will be closed to impress a voltage on the electrodes so that when the electrodes contact with the animal it will be shocked by flow of current to the animal. If the voltage selector 28 is in off position no volttage will be impressed; when the selector is in 1 position, the voltage will be impressed through. the resistor 35 of high value, so as to impress a minimum voltage on the electrodes. Likewise, when the selector is in the 2 posi tion, a higher voltage will be impressed on the electrodes because of the lower resistance 31;

while when the selector is in the 3 position, the highest voltage will be impressed on the electrodes. It will be understood, of course, that in this embodiment the voltage which will be impressed will be the voltage applied to the animal upon the flow of current; such voltage when the selector is in the 1 and 2 positions being the resultant voltage due to the existence of voltage drop brought about by the inclusions of the resistances 36or 31, respectively, as distinguished from the voltage of the line, impressed when the selector is in the 3 position. With this construction, therefore, a variable voltage may be impressed upon the electrodes, this voltage being readily varied by the voltage selector for controlling the shock delivered tothe live stock.

In the embodiment shown in Figures 1 and 2, it is not necessary that there be a ground connection for impressing the voltage; however, in order to avoid shock to the manipulator, a ground connection to the casing is provided by a ground clamp 46 adaptable to any suitable ground for that purpose. Ihe circuit, including the electrodes and the source Of current, is normally open when the push button 22 of the switch 22 is not depressed, so that after the voltage selector has been set, the circuit may be closed by depression of a button, in order to apply the voltage determined by the position of the selector. However, the circuit may also be opened by moving the selector 2!! to the off position.

In the embodiment shown in Figure 3 in which similar parts are indicated by the same reference numerals as in Figure 2, the voltage varying means is in the form of a transformer comprising a primary 5i] and-a secondary iii. The primary 59 may have a suitable number of turns compared with that of the secondary, but divided into three sections by taps brought out to the contacts 32, 33 and 3 1-, and the lead 39 may have a resistance 52 on the order of 25,000 ohms. The push button switch 22 may also be of the double pole, instead of the single pole type. when the selector is in'the 1 position by contact of with. 32 the lowest, voltage is impressed upon the electrodes through the resistance 52. In po-- sition 2 by contact of 3D with 33, the voltage impressed is doubled, and in position 3 by contact of 30 with 34, it is tripled, because of the ratio of transformation.

In Figure 4 similar parts are indicated by the same reference numerals as in Figure 2, with the push button switch 22 again of the double pole type. This electric prodder is arranged for connection to a source of direct current, such as a battery. In this embodiment the means for varying the impressed voltage is in the form of an induction coil comprising a primary to and a secondary iii. A vibrator 63 contacting with a contact screw 65 is vibrated by the primary \vhich'may be provided with an iron core (not shown). In this case, the induction coil is made of sufficiently high resistance so that an extra resistance need not be provided in the lead (it, particularly since the voltage applied to the primary may be low, on the order of 6 volts. In this case, as in the Figures 2 and 3, when the voltage selector is in the l, 2 and 3 positions by contact of 36 with 32, 33 and 3d respectively, successively increasing voltages are impressed on the electrodes.

In Figure 5, the embodiment is as in Figure 2, with similar parts indicated by the same reference numbers. In this case, however, there is only a single electrode 3, which is permitted because the lead 1 can be grounded as shown at 10. The voltage applied to the electrode returns through the ground in order to complete the circuit. Likewise, in Figures 3 and 4 a single electrode may be provided by again connecting the lead 23 to a ground a prodder such as shown in Figures 2-4 is, however, advantageous, because it enables more close control of the prodding action.

It will, therefore, be seen that this invention accomplishes its objects. An electric prodder is provided in which the voltage impressed on one or more electrodes designed for contact with the animal may be varied. The prodder is simple in construction and the parts can all be assembled on a pole so as to make a compact and readily manipulated instrument.

The conditions under which an electric prodder for live stock is used are unique. The purpose of a prodder is not to drive the animal, but to guide it by applying the electric current to the body at such part of the animal as will cause it to move away from the prodder; thus, if it is desired that the animal move forward, the prodder is applied to its rear end; if it is desired that the animal move backward, the prodder is applied at its front end; while, if it is desired that the animal be moved sidewisc, the prodder is applied at the side. Throughout, the purpose is to only apply current of such value as is necessary to effect the purpose in mind; for the purpose is not to scare or torture-the animal or to make it wild, but to simply cause it to obey the driver as was frequently done by tap of a stick or a whip handle.

Difierent animals are susceptible to different current intensities and the difference in this respect is particularly true of different classes of live-stock, such as cattle, sheep, horses hogs. Moreover, in each of the classes, the young are more susceptible than the old. Moreover, pregnant animals must be handled very carefully so as not to frighten them. By providing; selective means on the pole for varying the current delivered by the electrode or electrodes to the animal upon contact therewith, the driver can quickly and selectively at that, apply the prodder to the animal at such a current may be required to cause it to obey.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed and desired to be secured by Leters Patent is:

1. An electric prodder for live-stock, compris ing, a pole, a live-stock contacting electrode on the pole adapted for connection to a source of electric current whereby a shock may be ii pressed upon the live-stock, and selective means carried by the pole and in circuit with said electrode for controllin the shock delivered to the live-stock.

2. An electric prodder for live-stock, comprising, a pole, a live-stock contacting electrode on the pole adapted for connection to a source of electric current whereby a shock may be impressed upon the live-stock, and selective means including a high resistance and carried by the pole and in circuit with said electrode for controlling the shock delivered to the live-stock,

3. An electric prodder for live-stock, comprising, a pole, a live-stock contacting electrode on the pole adapted for connection to a source of electric current whereby a shock may be im pressed upon the live-stock, a series of resistances carried by the pole, and means carried by the pole for selectively including the resistances in .5 circuit with said electrode in order to control the shock delivered to the live-stock.

4. An electric prodder for live-stock, comprising, a pole, a live-stock contacting electrode on the ole adapted for connection to a. source of electric current whereby a shock may be impressed upon the live-stock, a transformer carried by the pole and having its secondary in circuit with said electrode, and means carried by the pole for selectively varying the primary oi the transformer in order to control the shock delivered to the live-stock.

5. An electric prodder for live-stock, comprising, a pole, a live-stock contacting electrode on the pole adapted for connection to a source of electric current whereby a shock may be impressed upon the live-stock, selective means carried by the pole and in circuit with said electrode for controlling the shack delivered to the livestock, and a switch on the pole for opening and closing the circuit.

LOUIS D. HAI'T'NER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

Patent Citations
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US1193168 *Oct 5, 1915Aug 1, 1916 Electbxc pbod-poxie
US1553135 *Feb 7, 1921Sep 8, 1925Byrnes Thomas JElectrocuting apparatus
US2199058 *Oct 30, 1937Apr 30, 1940Prime Mfg CoElectric fence
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3509693 *Jul 26, 1967May 5, 1970French Herbert CEquestrian electric spur
US5471954 *Jul 25, 1994Dec 5, 1995Tri-Tronics, Inc.Animal training electrode structure including integral resistive element
US5605116 *Sep 1, 1994Feb 25, 1997D.T. Systems, Inc.Electronic animal training system
Classifications
U.S. Classification231/7, 361/232
International ClassificationF41B15/04, F41B15/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41B15/04
European ClassificationF41B15/04