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Publication numberUS2442890 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 8, 1948
Filing dateDec 6, 1944
Priority dateDec 6, 1944
Publication numberUS 2442890 A, US 2442890A, US-A-2442890, US2442890 A, US2442890A
InventorsChristian Gabrielsen, Jules Nisenson
Original AssigneeRowe Mfg Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin selector
US 2442890 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 8, 1948. C, GABR|EL$EN ErAL 2,442,890

COIN SELECTOR Filed DSC. 6, 1944 INVENTORS Patented l.lune 8, 1948 COIN SELECTOR ChristianGabrielsen, Mountain Lakes, N. J., and Jules Nisenson, New York, N. Y., assignorsV to Rowe Manufacturing Co., Inc., New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application-December 6, 1944, Serial No. 566,798.

Claims. 1

This invention relates to improvements in vending machinesand more particularly in coin sorting devices .for such machines.

The general object of the invention is to provide improvedfmeans for sorting coins of diiTerent. denominations.

With .this and still other objects which will appear in the following fulldescription inrnind, the invention consists in the combinations, arrangements of .parts andv details of construction, whichwillnow iirstvbe fully described in connectionwith the accompanying drawing, and thenbe more particularly. pointed. out inthe appended claims.

In the drawing:

Figure 1 is aside elevation of the upper part of a coin selector embodying, the invention in a preferred form,

Figure 2 is a View similar` to Figure 1 but with certainfparts removed toshow. the internal mechanism,

Figure 3 is a section takenlontheline 3-3 of Figure 2,

Figure 4 is a detail view-taken onthe line 4 4 of Figure 1; and

Figure 5 is a detailview taken Omthel'ine 5-5 of liligrure 1.

Inthe drawing, there is shown` only'theupper part of the coin selector, it beingunderstood that the complete coin, selector embodies `additional structure together.` with: suitable coin guiding, testing or registering mechanis-msuch-` for example, as shown inv the previousGabrielsen Patent No..2,28.6,614. The device offthe present invention is intended to provide for'the-rapid sorting of coins of diierent denominations, such as o uarters, nickels'and dimes,.which,are inserted `in the machine through a common slot l, as indicated in Figure 2, and comprises a plate 2 serving as the general supporting structure and on which are carried the various testing, guiding and sorting devices. As best shown in Figure l, cover plate 3 is pivotally supported' on. a shaft 4 which is carriedin bearings at 5 andIrby the support plate 2. Thecoil spring 'I serves tofurge the plate into the position lof Figures l and. 3.. The plate il. also carries the projection. 8 cooperating with vertically slidable member 9 so that upward movement of this member swings the plate 3 outwardly for stripping ycoins or slugs. ture, being similar to that shown` in the previous Gabrielsen Patent No. 2,286,614 and forming in itself no part of the Ipresent invention, requires no further description. The plate 3 is formed with :apertures I0 and II to accommodate two This operating strucmagnets I2 and I3. which are fastened to support plate 2 andwith a further aperture Ill to permit movement of the coins, as later described. and alsocarries the member 'l5 (Figure 2) which denes, together. with the plates 2 and. certain coin passageways, as later described in detail.

The upper surface i6 ofv memberr l5 forms the bottom of apassageway. down which coins insertedin the slot I rollby gravity. In so rolling. the vcoins pass through the iield of magnet I2 which serves` to stop paramagneti-c` slugs. Such slugs are removed from the device by the stripping arm Il Ipivotally carriedat I8 on the supportfplate 2 and1 actuated by the member (l. .as will bev understood, as the-member 9 is moved. upwardly, plate 3 swings .outwardly carrying with it the member I5 and..leaving yany slug held by the magnet I2 unsupported. The arm. I Tl swinge ing downwardly, pushes the slug outofthe field of magnet I2 so that it falls upon the beveled upper surface of deflector member I5 and is directed into a passageway for returns or rejects. Coins which pass themagnet l2 continue to roll down the incline IB and are sorted according to size. To accomplish this purpose, the support plate 2 carries a .pair of deilecting members. 2l? and 2I and each of `which comprises an inclined forward portion Zlla, or 2Ia and rearward stops 2Ilb or 2lb. Adjacent the membersv 20. and 2i. the plate 2. is formed with apertures 22 and 23 having upper edges 24 and 25 which are beveled or slanted away from the support plate 3 and lower edges 2B and 21 which are slanted toward the plate 3. As will be observed, the upper edges of both of these apertures, which form the entrances for the coin passages 22, 32 and 23. 33, arey positioned above the incline lSby less than the diameter of the smallest coin. used` which, in this case, is a dime. On the opposite side from plate 3, there is affixed to support plate 2 a member 28 comprisingan upper portion forming a coin receiving hopper 29 for the apertures. 22 and 23, the hopperv serving toreceive any coin deflected out from the incline I6 and.. to guide 'Y' the same into the opening 22 or 23.as the case maybe. Coins sodeilectedwillbe carried from .openings 22 and 23 onto the 4respective inclines 30- and 3| from. whence they proceed into the quarter passage 32, or nickelpassage 33; Adime, being of insuiiicientdiameter to engage either memberll :or 20, will roll .down the incline into the dime passageway 34 as indicated.

As just stated, a dime, since it engages neither of the members 20 and 2l, will roll all the way down the incline I6 into the dime passageway.

A nickel will be of insufficient diameter to engage the member 20 but will engage the member 2|. When it so engages, it will be deflected outwardly, causing it to fall oi the incline I6, whereupon it enters the opening 23 and is guided onto the incline 3| so that it rpasses into the nickel passageway 33. A quarter will similarly be deflected into the passageway 32 by the member 20?.

Within the limits of the coin passageway above the incline I6, the members 20 and 2| are beveled, as best shown in Figure 4 and the stops 20h and 2lb extend outwardly into the space for accommodating tilted coins Iwhich is created by the bent portion 35 of the plate 3. Accordingly, the action of each of the members 2U and 2i is to urge the rupper part of the coin outwardly and the Aportion 35 serves as a fulcrum, so that the result is to urge the lower part of the coin in the opposite direction and positively deflect it into the opening 22 or 23, as the case may be. The portions 20a, and 2|a of the members 20 and 2|, in addition to being slanted in a direction parallel to the surface I6, are also beveled downwardly as shown in Figure 5. In this way, the turning movement of the coin is effected smoothly and continuously without any possibility of binding. Slugs of diameters other than the coins referred to may, however, be stopped and held in the machine by the members 261 and 2|, due to their inability to pass into the openings 22 or 23. Where this occurs, they will be dropped off when the member 9 is actuated to open the plate 3 and will be rejected.

As will be observed, a means has been provided by means of which the coins are sorted into their proper -passages without any slowing down and with the full velocity of the coins being preserved and utilized to eiect the sorting. In this way, the sorting of coins from a common slot is accomplished by very simple mechanism without slowing the operation of the machine.

What is claimed is:

1. Coin sorting mechanism comprising, in combination, a runway for coins to be sorted, a coinV deflector in said runway, spaced from the bottom thereof to engage coins of given diameter but not coins f lesser diameter and having a coin engaging portion slanting outwardly from one wall of said runway in the direction of travel of coins therealong, the said wall having an opening below said deflector for discharging a coin laterally from said runway, a fulcrum opposite said coin deflector and below said coin engaging portion for cooperating therewith to tilt coins so that their lower portions are forced laterally under said deiiector, and into said opening and a coin receiving passageway alongside said runway and communicating with said opening below said deiiector for receiving coins deected thereby.

2. Coin sorting mechanism comprising, in combination, a runway for coins to be sorted comprising a floor and members defining side walls, a coin deflector in said runway, spaced from the floor thereof to engage coins of` given diameter but not coins of lesser diameter and having a coin engaging portion slanting across said runwayin the direction of coin travel, a passageway alongside said runway and extending through one of the said side wall members adjacent said deflector to form in said wall an opening below said deflector for receiving coins deected thereby, and the other said side wall member having a fulcrum for urging the lower portion of a coin engaged by said deector oft' the said oor and into said opening below said deector for deflecting the coin into said passageway.

3. Coin sorting mechanism comprising, in combination, a runway=for coins to be sorted, a coin deector in said runway, spaced from the bottom thereof to engage coins of given diameter but not coins of lesser diameter and having a coin engaging :portion slanting outwardly from one wall of said runway in the direction of travel of coins therealong, the said wall having an opening below said deector for discharging a coin laterally from said runway and a stop beyond said slanting portion, a ulcrum opposite said coin deector and below said coin engaging portion for tilting coins under said deector and into said opening, and a coin receiving passageway alongside said runway and communicating with said opening below said delector for receiving coins deflected into said opening,

4. Coin sorting mechanism comprising in combination, a runway for coins to be sorted, means for tilting coins laterally out of said runway comprising a coin deiector in said runway and spaced from the bottom thereof to engage coins of given diameter but not coins of lesser diameter and means cooperating with said deector for tilting the lower part of the coin laterally, and a passageway alongside said runway having an entrance from said runway through the runway wall below said deiiector for receiving coins deflected thereby and the top of the said entrance being spaced from the bottom of the said runway by a distance less than the diameter of coins of said lesser diameter.

5. Coin sorting mechanism comprising, in combination, a runway for coins to be sorted, a coin deflector in said runway, spaced from the bottom thereof to engage coins of given diameter but not coins of lesser diameter and having a coin engaging portion slanting outwardly from one wall of said runway in the direction of travel of coins therealong, a fulcrum in the other wall of the runway opposite said coin def-lector and below said coin engaging portion for tilting coins under said deflector, and a coin receiving passageway alongside said runway having an entrance from said runway through the first mentioned wall below said deflector for receiving coins deflected thereby and the top of the said entrance being spaced from the bottom of the said runway by a distance less than the diameter of coins of said lesser diameter.

CHRISTIAN GABRIELSEN. JULES NISENSON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 229,712 Junkin July 6, 1880 574,528 Elder Jan. 5,1897

2,215,673 Tratsch et al Sept. 24, 1940 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 246,074 England Jan. 21, 1926

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US229712 *Mar 12, 1880Jul 6, 1880FJames h
US574528 *Jan 5, 1897 Coin separator and distributer
US2215673 *Nov 18, 1938Sep 24, 1940Walter A TratschCoin chute
GB246074A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2768727 *Jun 15, 1951Oct 30, 1956Nat Rejectors GmbhCoin separators
US2823783 *Jan 25, 1954Feb 18, 1958Walter P AttenburgCoin testing device
US3059748 *Feb 10, 1959Oct 23, 1962Zygmut S KrysiakMultiple coin separator
US3096864 *Nov 7, 1957Jul 9, 1963Reed Electromech CorpCoin selector device
US4911280 *Mar 16, 1988Mar 27, 1990Bruner Philemon LMethod and apparatus for deflecting coins while maintaining an on-edge orientation
US5988349 *May 22, 1992Nov 23, 1999Imonex Services, Inc.Apparatus and method for separating and rejecting coins
US6155399 *Jan 28, 1999Dec 5, 2000Imonex, Inc.Coin acceptance system including anti-fraud feature
US7635059Feb 2, 2000Dec 22, 2009Imonex Services, Inc.Apparatus and method for rejecting jammed coins
Classifications
U.S. Classification194/338, 453/5, 194/321
International ClassificationG07D3/00, G07D3/12
Cooperative ClassificationG07D3/123
European ClassificationG07D3/12B2