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Publication numberUS2443395 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 15, 1948
Filing dateFeb 23, 1946
Priority dateFeb 23, 1946
Publication numberUS 2443395 A, US 2443395A, US-A-2443395, US2443395 A, US2443395A
InventorsLutins Edward S
Original AssigneeHerman Soskin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Whistling toy rocket projectile
US 2443395 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 15, 1948. v s Q ms 2,443,395

WHISTLING TOY ROCKET PROJECTILE Filed Feb. 23, 1946 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTO'R EDWARD S. Lu'rms Patented June 15 1943 UNITED s'r. 'rr.s PATENT OFFICE Edward S. Lutins, Bronx, N. Y., assignorof-onehalf to Herman Soskin, Batersom-N. .L; 7

Application February 23, 1946, SerialNo. 649,659

This invention relates in general to a toy rocket,and in particular toa whistling toy simulating in appearance and sound a rocket projectile.

This invention proposes a toy rocket which is adapted to be projected through the air and which simulates in its flightboth the sound and appearance of a rocket in flight.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a toy rocket having a suction cup tip and having whistles mounted thereon to simulate in flight the sound of aflyingrocket.

Other objects of the invention as well as the construction, use and operation thereof will in part be obvious and will in part become apparent from the following disclosure.

For further comprehension, of the invention,

"and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawing formin a material part of this disclosure:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a toy rocket according to one form of the invention.

Fig. 2 is a perspective, view of the'tip of the rocket shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3,is an exploded perspective view of a whistle member of the rocket shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a side elevati'onal view of a rocketaccording to another embodiment ofthe invention.

Fig. 5 is a sectional view of the article shown in Fig. 4, taken along thelines 5-5.

Fig. 6 is a front elevation of the rocket shown in Fig. 4 with the suction cup tip removed.

Fig. '7 is an exterior View of a modified form of toy structure.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary view ofthe rear portion of the toy illustrated in Fig. 7 showing the use of arrow feathers thereon.

Fig. 9 is a view partly insection of the toy illustrated in Fig. 7.

Fig. 10 is a view in perspective of the tube mounting member.

Referring to the figures in detail, there is shown in Fig. 1 a rocket generally designated l0 comprising a body I I on which is mounted a tail l2, aplurality of whistle members I3, a front guiding member [4, and a suction cup tip [5.

The body II is in general astreamlined, rocket shaped body of light weight. Preferably this body is constructed of a light weight wood such whistle as, balsam or the like, or alternatively of alight metal construction such as a hollow aluminum 12 Claims. (01. awa -ices) shell or the like. Other structural materials and shapes will; ofcourse' be obvious to those skilled in the art.., Due to the lightness of the weight of ,thebody,the toy is adapted for use either out- .doors or indoorsjwithout fear of breaking fragile objects'near which" the rocket is aimed.

The front jguiding member l4 and the tail 12 each comprises a plurality of thin flns which are mounted on the body in a direction to parallel the proposed direction of flight of the toy. These members serve to balance the rocket in its flight,

andto make it easier to aim. On the front end of the body is mounteda suction cup tip "5, which is shown in further detail in Fig. 2. This tip comprises the cup l6 which is in the form of a conventional suction cup, I This pin ll 'is' adapted to be slidably mounted within a recessin the nose of the body; so that the cup isremovably mounted on the front end thereof.

A collar" I8 on the pin prevents the pin from being sunktoo deeply within the body. Optionally' the tip is removable from "the body;

alternatively it is fixed therein by means of glue or the like.

, Mounted along the body, preferably near the front thereof are a plurality of Whistle members l3, which are shown in further'detail in Fig. 3.

These whistle members l3 comprise a whistle body 20 and an air tube 2| mounted on the forward side thereof. The whistle body comprises a' conventional whistle, namely a whistle which is'actiyatedb-y a current of air therethrough. Such whistle bodies are well known to the art,

and-need not be described in detail herein. The

air tube -2l is a soft, very flexible hollow member positioned on the front of the whistle body, and projecting'in front of the tip in an outward direction. Suitably this tube may be a thin walled soft rubber tube.

The air tubes on the various whistle members areaimed in a generally forward direction, but outwardly from'tlie. center line. of the body, so that the front ends of the tubes are substantially outside the air currents set up by the passage of the body through the air. Likewise the front ends of the tubes are cut on an oblique angle with respect to the center line of the tubes, either tomake the frontof the tube at right'angles to the line of flight, or preferably to make the edge further from the center line of the body the leading edge, slightly advanced over the inner edge. ThisanguIar cut ofthe tube is shown clearly in Fig. 1. H

The operation of the toy is clear from the figures and the above description. The toy rocket is caused to fly through the air, for example by being projected from a toy gun or the like, or alternatively by being manually thrown. The fins comprising the tail and front guide keep the toy headed in the direction of flight, and constantly aim the tip forward.

The outwardly extending air tube gathers in a large air flow, and directs it through the whistle bodies, thereby producing a shriek-like whistle which simulates the well-known whistle of a rocket through the air. Optionally the various whistle members are of different pitch so. that the whistle of several tones is created, for example with a discordant sound to make the sound a more fearsome imitation of a realrocket sound;

Upon impact with an external object the airtubes are readily flexed out of the way, permitting the suction cup member to contact the surface ofv the object. The momentum of the toy causes the suction cup to adhere to the external surface.

In addition to, the imitation of the rocket-like noise and appearance, the tip permits the toy to be used in games where the aim of the operator is being tested or recorded, For example, the toy may readily be used in games resembling dart games and the like, adding thereto the interest of both appearance and sound.

In Figs. 4 to 6 is shown another form of the invention, generally similar to the, previously dis.- closed form, comprising a body ll having a. tail l2, a plurality of whistle members 3, a front guide member I l and a tip [5. The body ll is similar in construction and form, and generally resembles the body shown in Fig. 1.

The tail l2 comprises a plurality of fins, at least the ends I9 of which are positioned at an angle to the direction of flight so as to cause the toy to turn in, flight. In the form of the invention specifically set forth in the figures, the ends of the fins are turned all in the same rotary direction, to cause the toy to rotatearound the center line during its flight, thus causing the toy to have a spinning appearance in flight' The front guide member 14 in this form of the invention is optionally mountedparallel with the direction of flight; alternatively the guide member M is turned in the same or opposite direction as the tail, to add tothe elfect of the tail or to modify the efiect.

In the form of the invention shown in the fig,- ure where the tail is curved to give a spinning motion, the whistle members are mounted on the body with the air tubes aimed in the direction of turning so as to pick up a greater flow of air. Thus, the tail is turned to cause the toy to turn in a clockwise direction while flying through the air, and the air tubeslikewise are pointed in a clockwise direction.

In Fig. 4 there is also shown a hook 22 mounted on the body ll by means of rivets or screws 23, the hook serving to receive a member of a pro,- J'ection means (not shown in the fiigure) for example an elastic string or the like. In this way, the toy is further adapted to be projected through the air by means other than simple manual means.

A modified form of toy structure is illustrated in the Figs. 7 to inclusive and consists of a stem 38 having molded or otherwise positioned thereon a body 3! of streamline shape which, in its front portion, has attached thereto, or is formed to provide, radially disposed guide vanes 32 one of which terminates at its rear edge in a beaded portion or pin 33 which is carried in the body 3!. The pin 33 provides a rubber band engaging member when one is used on the hand in the well-known manner to launch the device. The front end of the body 3| abuts a molded tube carrier 34 which may be of rubber or other suitable material and which consists of radially disposed cylindrical base members 35 cast in one unit, strengthened by the webs 38 and providing a central opening 3'! through the latter of which the stem 30 extends.

Each of the cylindrical portions 35 is provided with an integral whistle tube 38 flared from the median line of the stem 39 and symmetrically arranged about the periphery of a suction cup 48 mounted on the front end of the stem 30. The whistleelement 34 is maintained in position on the stem 30 through the medium of a flanged nipple ll. The device is launched by throwing or by the use of a rubber band and if desired the rear end of the stem 36 may be provided with arrow feathers 42. which provide an additional whistling sound and also guide the toy in its flight. The body 3! may be relatively weighted 'if desired so that the device may be thrown by grasping the stem 30 and the action of the tubes 38, in conjunction with the. suction cup 40, is the same as above describedand the tubes 38 likewise extend slightly beyond the front face of the suction cup All).

While I have illustrated and described the preferredembodiments of my invention, it, is to be understood that I do, not limit myself to the precise construction herein disclosed and. theright is reserved to all changes and modifications coming within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Havingv thus. described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is:

1. A toy rocket comprising a body, a tail mounted on the body and a front guide member mounted on the body, said tail and guide members coacting to direct the motion of the body, through the air, at least one whistle member mounted on the body to whistle as the body moves through the air, and a suction cup tip, on the iront of the body to adhere to a surface of an external object which the toy rocket strikes in flight, and a flexible air tube extending forward from said whistle member and terminating forward from said suction cupto direct a current of air through said whistle member.

2. A toy rocket comprising a body, a tailmounted on the-body and a front guide member mounted. on the body, said tailand guide members 00- acting to direct the motion of'the body through the air, a plurality of whistle members; mounted on the body to whistle as the body moves through the air, and-a suction cup tip on thefrontoizthe bod to adh r v to a ur ace, Q v a x e n l b c which the toy rocket strikes in flight, and a flex ible air tube extending forward from each of said whistle members and terminatingforward from said suction cup to direct a current of air throu h said whistle members.

3, A toy rocket comprising a body, a tailmounted on the body and a front guide member mounted on the, body. said tail and guide memberscoacting to direct themotion of the body through the air, a plurality of whistle members mounted on the body. to whistleas the body moves through the air, and a suction cuptip on the front. of the body toadhere. to a surface of an external object which the toy'rocket strikes in flight, and aflex- .ibleairtube extending. forward. fromeach oi said whistle members and terminating forward from said suction cup to direct a current of air through said whistle members, said tail member being turned at least at its end to cause the rocket to rotate in its flight.

4. A toy rocket comprising a body, a tail mounted on the body and a front guide member mounted on the body, said tail and guide members coacting to direct the motion of the body through the air, a plurality of whistle members mounted on the body to whistle as the body moves through the air, and a suction cup tip on the front of the body to adhere to a surface of an external object which the toy rocket strikes in flight, and a flexible air tube extending forward from each of said whistle members and terminating forward from said suction cup to direct a current of air through said Whistle members, said tail member being turned at least at its end to cause the rocket to rotate in its flight, and the air tubes mounted on the whistle members being turned in the direction of rotation of the rocket.

5. A toy rocket comprising a body, a tail mounted on the body and a front guide member mounted on the body, said tail and guide members coacting to direct the motion of the body through the air, a plurality of Whistle members mounted on the body to whistle as the body moves through the air, and a suction cup tip removably mounted on the front of the body to adhere to a surface of an external object which the toy rocket strikes in flight, and a flexible air tube extending forward from each of said whistle members and terminating forward from said suction cup to direct a current of air through said whistle members.

6. A toy rocket comprising a body, a tail mounted on the body and a front guide member mounted on the body, said tail and guide members coacting to direct the motion of the body through the air, a plurality of Whistle members mounted on the body to whistle as the body moves through the air, and a suction cup tip removably mounted on the front of the body to adhere to a surface of an external object which the toy rocket strikes in flight, and a flexible air tube extending forward from each of said whistle members and terminating forward from said suction cup to direct a current of air through said whistle members, said tail member being turned at least at its end to cause the rocket to rotate in its flight, and the air tubes mounted on the whistle members being turned in the direction of rotation of the rocket.

7. A toy rocket comprising a body, a tail mounted on the body and a front guide member mounteed on the body, said tail and guide members coacting to direct the motion of the body through the air, a plurality of whistle members mounted on the body to whistle as the body moves through the air, and a suction cup tip removably mounted on the front of the body to adhere to a surface of an external object which the toy rocket strikes in flight, and a flexible air tube extending forward from each of said whistle members and terminating forward from said suction cup to direct a current of air through said whistle members, said whistles being adapted to emit sounds of different pitches from one another.

8. A toy rocket comprising a body, a tail mounted on the body and a front guide member mounted on the body, said tail and guide members coacting to direct the motion of the body through the air, a plurality of whistle members mounted on the body to whistle as the body moves through the air, and a suction cup tip removably mounted on the front of the body to adhere to a surface of an external object which the toy rocket strikes in flight, and a flexible air tube extending forward from each of said whistle members and terminating forward from said suction cup to direct a current of air through said whistle members, said tail member being turned at least at its end to cause the rocket to rotate in its flight, and the air tubes mounted on the whistle members being turned in the direction of rotation of the rocket, said whistles being adapted to emit sounds of different pitches from one another.

9. A toy rocket comprising a stem, a body of streamlined contour on said stem, guide vanes radiating from said body, a tube carrier mounted on said stem and abutting said body, whistle tubes extending forwardly from the body in circular arrangement relatively thereto, said tubes being flared with respect to the median line of said stem, and a suction cup on the forward end of said stern disposed centrally of said tube arrangement.

10. A toy rocket comprising a stem, a body of streamlined contour on said stem, guide vanes radiating from said body, a tube carrier mounted on said stem and abutting said body, whistle tubes extending forwardly from the body in circular arrangement relatively thereto, said tubes being flared with respect to the median line of said stem, a suction cup on the forward end of said stem disposed centrally of said tube arrangement, and a launching pin associated with one of said guide vanes.

11. .A toy rocket comprising a stem, a loody of streamlined contour on said stem, guide vanes radiating from said body, a tube carrier mounted on said stem and abutting said body, Whistle tubes extending forwardly from the body in circular arrangement relatively thereto, said tubes being flared with respect to the median line of said stem, a suction cup on the forward end of said stem disposed centrally of said tube arrangement, a launching pin associated with one of said guide vanes and arrow feathers at the rear end of said stem constituting whistle means for guiding said toy in flight.

12. A toy rocket comprising a stem, a body of streamlined contour on said stern, guide vanes radiating from said body, a tube carrier mounted on said stem and abutting said body, whistle tubes extending forwardly from the body in circular arrangement relatively thereto, said tu'bes being flared with respect to the median line of said stein, a suction cup on the forward end of said stem disposed centrally of said tube arrangement, a launching pin associated with one of said guide vanes, arrow feathers at the rear end of said stem constituting whistle means for guiding said toy in flight and said tubes extending forwardly of said suction cup.

EDWARD S. LUTINS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,328,967 Reaben Jan. 27, 1920 1,774,765 Schoen Sept. 2, 1930 2,274,208 Mull Feb. 24, 1942 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 44,848 Switzerland Dec. 1, 1908

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2621441 *Dec 1, 1948Dec 16, 1952Worden Floyd OWhistling toy aerial projectile
US2757932 *Sep 11, 1953Aug 7, 1956Shaw Horace EAudible shuttlecocks
US2836930 *Jan 9, 1956Jun 3, 1958Wintriss IncMissile with ram jet sounding device
US2899773 *Feb 25, 1957Aug 18, 1959 Aerial toy
US3077876 *Aug 12, 1960Feb 19, 1963Richter Gunther MLaunching devices
US3106400 *Aug 29, 1960Oct 8, 1963Zwickey Clifford JArchery arrows
US3225488 *Jan 13, 1964Dec 28, 1965Goldfarb Adolph EInflatable aerial toy
US4946172 *Feb 16, 1989Aug 7, 1990Franklin Sports Industries, Inc.Safety dart
US4958617 *Mar 23, 1989Sep 25, 1990Anderson Jeffrey RArchery arrow and sabot
US5119797 *Jul 18, 1990Jun 9, 1992Anderson Jeffrey RArchery device and arrow
US5306191 *Apr 19, 1993Apr 26, 1994Phillips Charles BCylindrical aerodynamic toy with ballast rings
US5613688 *Nov 13, 1995Mar 25, 1997Carella; Richard F.Arrow vane
US6083127 *Dec 11, 1998Jul 4, 2000Hasbro, Inc.Energy absorbing sound emitting toy dart
US6123599 *Jul 8, 1998Sep 26, 2000Chiang; John H.Multi-axis sound toys
US20130037012 *Aug 10, 2011Feb 14, 2013Douglas M. GausToy for flinging missile or other projectile
EP0911602A2 *Oct 23, 1998Apr 28, 1999Gerhard GabrielNoise generating device on an arrow for use in archery.
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/571, 473/572, 446/216
International ClassificationF42B12/36, F42B8/00, F42B12/02, F42B8/06
Cooperative ClassificationF42B8/06, F42B12/362
European ClassificationF42B8/06, F42B12/36B