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Publication numberUS2444471 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 6, 1948
Filing dateSep 29, 1943
Priority dateSep 29, 1943
Publication numberUS 2444471 A, US 2444471A, US-A-2444471, US2444471 A, US2444471A
InventorsDavid Samiran, Replogle George W
Original AssigneeDavid Samiran, Replogle George W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Switch
US 2444471 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 6, 1948. D. SAMIRAN ET AL 2,444,471

SWITCH Filed Sept. 29, 1943 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 July 6, 1948'.v D. sAMlRAN ET AL 2,444,471

SWITCH Filed Sept. 29. 1945 l 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIGA- INVENTORS Dau/D JAM/@HN 6.50955 ./PpLasLg-f 'mama Jui, s, 194e i SWITCH David Samiran, Osborn, and George W. lteplogle, Dayton, Ohio Application September 29, 1943, Serial No. 504,264

(Cl. 20o-6) (Granted under the act of March 3,1883, as amended April 30, 1928; 370l O. G. 757) 3, Claims.

The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for Government for governmental purposes, without the payment to us of any royalty thereon.

'I'his invention relates to a control switch for a series of solenoid-operated valves and may have a variety of uses, such, for example, as controlling the flow from a series of fuel tanks on an aircraft. s A

An object of the invention is to-provide, in a device of this character, electrically energized valve-opening means which lfirst utilizes ample .electrical energy for operating the valve `to its open position, then reduces the applied energy to the minimum required for holding the valve open. Another object is to provide, in combination with a series of electrically operated valves of the kind mentioned. a selective switch mechanism particularly-applicable to their operation in the manner indicated. I

Other objects and advantages will become evident as the invention is described in greater detail, reference being had to the diagrams and drawings wherein:

Fig. 1 is an axial section through one of the solenoid valves showing the double winding Fig. 2 is an axial section vthrough lthe multiple switch used in connection with a series of the solenoid valves shown in Fig. l, the section being taken through the rotating and several of the movable contact members at 2--2 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 3 is a transverse section through the switch taken at 3-3 of Fig. 2, showing a snap action means of novel construction.

Fig. 4 is a schematic illustration of the switch arranged for connection to a series of the solenoid valves to be operated, the wiring diagram, showing the connections, being included.

Fig. 5 shows a simplified, though somewhat less effective, arrangement` of the switch and valves.

Like reference characters have reference to like parts throughout the several drawings and diagrams.

Referring more particularly to Fig. 1, a valve body 'l0 has a hub I2 for a fluid inlet opening I4, and a hub I6 for a fluid outlet opening I8. A valve disk 2li is concentric with the outlet opening I8 and rests on a valve seat member 22 which is preferably press-fitted into a recessed portion of .the hub I6.

Attached to the upper side of the valve body I0 by screws 24 is a solenoid spool which comprises a lower head 26, an upper head 2l, and a connecting tube 30. these three main parts of the spool 'being preferably press-fitted together, the upper 2 head into the tube and the lower head over it. The tube 30 should preferably be made of nonmagnetic material to break the continuity of the magnetic circui-t.

Attached vto the upper side of the valve disk 26 by a screw 32 is a solenoid core 34. Core 34 lls freely slidable in the tube 30 of the solenoid spool. A diaphragm gasket 36 is held clamped at its outer edge between the body I6 and the spool head 26, and at its inner edge between the solenoid core 34 and the valve disk 20. An annular bead 38 around the outer edge of the gasket is held under compression in a suitably shaped groove in the top surface of the body I0, while another annular bead 40 is held under compression in a suitable groove in the lower face of the core 34.

A spring 42 has its lower end nested in an opening in the core 34 and its upper end resting against the lower end of a pipe plug 44 which is screwed pressure-tight into the upper head 28 of the solenoid spool. A small hole 46 extends upwardly through the screw 32 and through the core 34, so that the suction pressure in the outlet opening I8 and in the space 48 above the core is equalized. In this way the pump suction will not materially augment the valve closing eiort of the spring 42.

A fine wire coil 50 is rst wound on the solenoid spool, then a coarse wire coil 52 is wound upon the coil 50. A flexible cable 54 extends from the coil 50, and a cable 56 from the coil 52. A housing 58 enshrouds the coil, its lower open end being held to the lower spool head 26 by screws '60, and 'its upper end being closed in to form the hub 62 to which a flanged member 64 is fastened by small screws 66. The member 64 is threaded as at 68 at the upper end for connection to an electric cable conduit, the cables 54 and 66 being brought out through the member 64 into the conduit (not shown). The inner ends of both coils may be grounded to a single screw lll in thelower spool head 26. The complete solenoid valve may be broadly designated by the numeral l5.

From a consideration of the above description of the solenoid valve 'I5 shown in Fig. 1, it will be obvious that, by application of sufficient electrical energy to the solenoid coils, the solenoid core I4 will rise and lift the valve disk 20 with it. It should be observed, however, that when the valve disk 20 is on the seat 22, it is v'being held thereon not only by the spring 42 but additionally by whatever vpressure may be present in Ithe inlet opening I4. Since the sum of these two'pressures is considerable, a solenoid coil of relatively large 68 lifting capacity is required to raise the valve disk 3 from the seat. but after it is so raised a .solenoid coil of relatively small lifting capacity will hold the valve disk in the open position.

It is for this reason that the two coils 62 and 6l are provided. the coil 52 being of sutiicient capacity to lift the valve -to open position. and the coil l being of that capacity only which is required for maintaining the valve in open position once it has been opened. For convenience in further description, the coarse wire coil l2 may hereinafter be referred to as the lifting coil, while the fine wire coil 58 may be called the holding coil. Such an arrangement in a solenoid valve is. of course, fully effective only when used in combination with some sort of electric switch which will direct the large volume of current ,to the lifting coil 62 of the solenoid for that fraction of a second only which is required to open the valve, then will cut off the current flowing through the lifting coll 52 and direct it through the holding coil 50 to hold the valve open.

Such an arrangement contributes largely to the success of the device, since the valve, once opened, must be held open for an extended period of time, and if the lifting coil were maintained in operation for such extended period it would not only result in excessive heating but would consume an excessive amount oi current.

The valve structure shown has, as one of its important applications. the remote control of the contents of a series of fuel tanks of an aircraft by providing each tank with one of the valves, then successively connecting first one, then another, of the tank-s to the fuel line by selectively operating the valves electrically. Accordingly, the embodiment shown to illustrate the invention may conveniently comprise six tanks, each having, at its outlet, one of the valves 15 illustrated and described with reference to Fig. l, the six valves being used in combination with asextuple switch for directing current, one at a time, to the selectedY one of the six valves, with means in the switch for momentarily energizing the lifting coil,

ieri permanently energizing the holding coil of the valve selected,

The sextuple switch, shown in Figs. 2 and 3, has a frame which comprises a front member 12 and a rear member 14, both of insulating material held axially spaced apart by a series of posts l, 33, Bil and 82. The front member 12 (see also en its forward face, carries the indicia ai switch positions 1 to 6, while the "is carries the series of terminals,

Fig. e), et 'the se .rear rn one termi into the o, and the remainder for directing current 'to e twelve coils which operate the six valves, terminals iL to 6L being employed for directing current to the lifting coils, and to 6 for directing current to the holding coils. For

convenience, the member-s 12 and 14 may respectively'be called the dial and the terminal board.

Supported on the posts 16 through 82, intermediate the dial and terminal board, are two dielectric contact-carrying disks 84 and 86. Disk 84 is located immediately in back of the dial 12, while disk 86 is spaced somewhat'forward of the terminal board 14. Disks 84 and 86, respectively, carry .centrally disposed power-supply contact disks S each encircled by a, concentric row of vtwelve insulatedly spaced contacts which are connected to the terminals, which in turn are connected to the solenoid coils of the switches. The lifting coil contacts are numbered IL, 2L, 3L, etc., and the holding coil contacts 2, 3, etc.

A shaft 88 has its front and -rear bearings at S for bringing the power-supply line the centers respectively of the dial 12 and disk 88 and is rotatable to its several positions by a pointer knob 90. A dielectric hub 81 is fastened to the shaft between the disks 84 and 86. At' its forward end, this hub carries the brush I4 which bridges electrically from the power-supply contact disk S to any one of the contacts of the circular row on the dielectric disk 84 to which it may be turned when the shaft is rotated by the pointer knob 90. At its rearward end, the hub carries a brush 86 which is angularly spaced 180 from the brush 84. This second brush 86 bridges from the central power-supply contact disk S to one after the other of the contacts of the circular row on the dielectric disk 86 as the shaft is rotated.

Midway between the dielectric disks 84 and 86 is 9, snap-action ,mechanism for quickly shifting the brushes 96 and 68 from the contact points upon which they rest to the next, as indicated by the spaces on thedial 12. This snap-action mechanism comprises a cam |00 which, in the instant case, is an integral part of the hub l! and is formed midway of the length of the hub, having six lobes |02 separated by notches |04.

A frame |06 comprises two side plates |88 spaced by shoulder rivets ||0 and has a roller Il! between the plates rotatable on a pin ||4. One end of the frame |06 is hinged to the post 16, the free end being swingable about the hinge to seat the roller in any one of the notches |04. An extension spring H6 has one end fastened to a rivet ||0 at the free end of the frame, and the other end anchored to the post 80, whereby the roller is yieldably held in the notch in which it is seated. The sextuple switch may be broadly designated by the numeral |15.

Fig. 4 is a schematic illustration of the switch shown in Figs. 2 and 3, the parts shown being the pointer knob S0, shaft 88, dial 12 with indicia 1 to 6 for the several tanks controlled, terminal board 14 with terminals to 6 and |L to 6L to which the coils of the solenoids are connected. and dielectric disks 84 and 86 with power-supply Contact disks S and contacts to 6 and IL to 6L for selectively directing current to the several terminals. Brushes 94 and 96 are shown in that position in which they connect contact disks S to contacts i. 'It should be noted (l) that terminal on disk 84 is diametrically opposite terminal i on disk 86; (2) that corresponding terminals on disk 84, disk 86, and board 14 are joined by electrical conductors; and (3) that the terminals on the disk 84 progress in the order i-2L-2-3L-3, etc., while those on the disk Il progress in the order |-|L 2-2L--3, etc. This arrangement accomplishes a particular purpose and constitutes one of the important features of the invention, the operation of which Ls as follows:

When the pointer knob 90 points to l, as seen in Fig. 4, current will flow from the power supply S of terminal board 14 through the conductor running to S of disk 86, across the brush 86 to the contact I and through a conductor to l on the terminal board 14 to which the coil 60 of the valve 15 of tank (not shown), is connected, whereby valve 15 of tank is open.

If now, with the pointer knob 90, the switch ||5 is snapped to the position 2, current will flow from the power supply S of terminal board 14 through the conductor running to S of disk 88. across the brush 86 to the contact 2 and through a conductor to 2 on the terminal board 14 to which the coil 50 of the valve .16 of tank 2 (not shown) is connected.

But while the brushes 94 and 96 moved from the contacts I to the contacts 2 on disks 84 and 86, they crossed and momentarily rested on intermediate contacts 2L on disk 84 and IL on disk 86. Electriflcation of the Contact IL on the disk 86 which energizes the lifting coil 52 for valve I, in this case was neither useful nor harmful, since valve I Was already open, but electrication of the contact 2L on disk 84, which energized the lifting coil 52 for valve 2, raised the valve 2 to open position so that the holding coil 50 which is energized through contact 2 may keep it open.

.The operation of the device in turning the pointer knob 90 from 1 to 2 is repeated in turning it from 2 to 3, 3v to 4, etc., and in all these cases `the electrication of the intermediate contacts 2L, 3L,etc., on disk 86 is neither useful nor harmful, since they, in each case, energize lifting coils 52 for valves which are already open, but electrication of the intermediate contacts on disk 84 in each case energizes the lifting coils 52 of valves which it is desired to open, and these coils lift the valves so that the corresponding holding coils 50 may maintain them in the open position.

The foregoing described the operation of the device in turning the pointer knob 90 clockwise, but it sometimes becomes desirable to turn this knob counterclockwise, as when turning from 1 to 6. In such case the brush 94 `on disk 84 will move on the contacts I-IL-S whereby electrification of the contact IL was neither useful nor harmful, but the brush 96 on the disk 86 moved on the contacts I-GL-G whereby the lifting magnet 52 of valve 6 was energized momentarily through the contact 6L before the holding magnet 50 was permanently energized to hold the valve 6 open. From this it will be seen that the disk 84 has its contacts arranged to perform a necessary function when the knob 90 is turned clockwise, while the disk 86 has its contacts arranged to perform the same function wher the knob is turned counterclockwise.

Conditions may, of course, arise where it is desirable to provide for clockwise rotation only in the switch which controls the valves. In such case the disk 84 and its contacts are retained and the disk 86 and its contacts are eliminated, the connection then being made as in Fig. 5. With this arrangement the lifting coil of any valve will be energized momentarily before the holding coil of the same valve as long as the switch is rotated clockwise.

Having thus described our invention, We claim:

1. In an electric switch, a. common contact adapted for connection to a source of current supply, a series of insulatedly spaced contacts each adapted for connection to a separate current receiving device, a brush member adapted for bridging from the common contact to the series of contacts one at a time, and a snap action means associated with said brush member operable to cause said brush member to move of! one contact member of the series. make instantaneous contact with a second of the series and stop on a third.

2. In a rotary electric switch, a common contact centrally disposed in said switch and adapted for connection to a source of current supply, a circular row of insulated contacts concentrically spaced around said common contact each adapted forconnecticn to a separate current receiving device, a manually rotatable member concentrically positioned in said switch, a brush member carried by said manually rotatable member adapted for bridging from the common contact to the circular row of contacts one at a time, and a snap action means associated with said manually rotatable member operable to cause said brush member to be rotated from engagement with one contact of the circular row, make instantaneous contact With the next contact of the circular row and stop on a third contact.

3. In a rotary electric switch, a terminal board, a contact supporting disc adjacent said terminal board, a common contact centrally disposed on said disc, a terminal on said terminal board in electrical communication with said common contact, a concentric row of insulated contacts carried by said contact supporting disc, a, terminal 0n said terminal board for each contact of said circular row, each contact of said circular row being in electrical communication with its respective terminal, and each terminal being adapted for connection to a separate current receiving device, a manually rotatable member carried by said switch, a brush member rotatable by said manually rotatable member adapted for bridging from the common contact to the circular row of contacts one at a time, and a snap action means associated with said manually rotatable member, operable to cause said brush member to be rotated from engagement with a selected contact of the circular row, make instantaneous contact with the next contact of the circular row and stop on a third contact,

DAVID SAMIRAN. GEORGE W. REPLOGLE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent;

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 709,135 Brown Sept. 16, 1902 1,038,598 Kellum Sept. 17, 1912 1,252,312 Warren Jan. 1, 1918 1,767,058 Eiseman June 24, 1930 1,888,684 Middleton Nov. 22, 1932 1,978,737 Bower Oct. 30, 1934 2,012,492 Arnold Aug. 27, 1935 2,089,279 Loeler Aug. 10, 1937 2,106,054 Leighton Jan. 18, 1938 2,292,478 Ray Aug. 11, 1942 2,303,382 Newhouse Dec 1, 1942 2,332,909 Fuscaldo Oct. 30, 1943 OTHER REFERENCES Ser. No. 303,854, Peterreins (A. P. 0.), published May 18, 1943.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2503885 *Apr 10, 1948Apr 11, 1950Globe Union IncSelector switch
US2644664 *Dec 22, 1947Jul 7, 1953Crane CoValve
US2661022 *Jul 23, 1947Dec 1, 1953Merlin GerinFluid control device
US2900629 *Mar 23, 1955Aug 18, 1959Sperry Rand CorpIndexing apparatus
US2920649 *Jul 28, 1953Jan 12, 1960Cochrane CorpLiquid flow control valve assembly
US2961001 *Jul 25, 1956Nov 22, 1960Double A Products CompanyPilot controlled valve
US3034761 *Dec 31, 1957May 15, 1962Dole Valve CoAnti-caking dispenser valve
US3504869 *May 17, 1960Apr 7, 1970Gen Dynamics CorpElectric missile control system
US4200122 *Sep 7, 1978Apr 29, 1980Miskin David MThermostat control solenoid for lawn watering
US5546987 *Sep 8, 1994Aug 20, 1996Sule; AkosSolenoid valve
USRE34261 *Apr 15, 1991May 25, 1993 Solenoid valve
Classifications
U.S. Classification200/6.00R, 137/870, 335/188, 137/628, 251/335.2
International ClassificationH01H19/58, H01H19/11, H01H19/00
Cooperative ClassificationH01H19/11, H01H19/58
European ClassificationH01H19/58, H01H19/11