Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2446308 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 3, 1948
Filing dateMay 25, 1942
Priority dateMay 25, 1942
Publication numberUS 2446308 A, US 2446308A, US-A-2446308, US2446308 A, US2446308A
InventorsLouis B Smith
Original AssigneeLouis B Smith
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Package
US 2446308 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Au 3, 1948. L B, SMITH 2,446,308

PACKAGE Filed May 25, 1942 I 2 Sheets-Sheet l Patented Aug. 3,1948

UNITED A STATES PATENT OFFICE raoxacn Louis B. Smith, outage, in Application May 25, 1942, Serial No. 444,321 4 Claims. (01. 22944) My invention relates generally to packages, and more particularly to container supported by a. rigid outer carton.

An object of my invention is the provision of a fluid-tight package having a convenient pouring spout and a support therefor.

Another object is to provide a package having an improved closure.

A further object of my invention is the provision of a package which may be fabricated both easily and inexpensively from materials which are readi ly accessible. g g

A further object is to facilitate the handling and storage of fluids, semi-fluids, freely flowing substances, and other materials by providing a package which may be filled and emptied easily,

and which occupies a minimum of space in relation to its cubic capacity.

Another object is to provide an improved package for frozen products.

Other objects and advantages will hereinafter appear.

While my invention is described as embodied in a more or less pliable fluid-tight inner container supported by a rigid outer carton, it is of course to be understood that my invention contemplates also the use of the inner container alone. Fur-' thermore, while the package embodied in my invention is described for use with frozen fluids, it may be used equally well with dairy products, petroleum products, grain and cereal-in fact with any substance that is relatively free flowing.

'In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of my package showing the pouring operation;

Fig. 2 is an exploded view of the various parts of the package, including the inner container, the protective liner, and the outer carton;

Fig, 3 is a side view of the inner container;

Fig. 4 is a. view of the spout of the inner container taken onthe line 4-4 of Fig. 3; V

Fig. 5 is a bottom perspective view of the outer container showing how it is fastened together by means of staples;

Fig. 6 is a plan view of the blank from the outer container is formed;

Fig. 7 is a. detailed view showing the inner and outer containers assembled prior to closing the package;

Fig. 8 is a detailed view similar to Fig. 7, showing the first step in closing the package;

Fig. 9 is a detailed view further depicting the closing of the package;

Fig. 10 is a detailed view likewise showing a subsequentstep in closing the package; and

which packages having an inner,

to permit it to be folded to a .the carton. Fig. 2 shows the Fig. 11 is a detailed view showing the package completely closed.

Referring to the drawings, the package is composed of an inner container or bag i2 preferably made of a relatively thin and pliable fluid-tight material of the type sold under the trademame "Heat Sealing Cellophane." This inner container, which may be formed from flat sheets or from material in tubular form is heat-sealed or crimped at the lower end l4 thereof to form a fluid-tight bag. The upper end of the bag is likewise sealed with the exception of a pouring spout It made integral with the container and having its inner or open side sealed by means of the same continuous heat-sealed welt or seam i8 which closes the top of the bag l2. The spout l 6 extends considerably beyond the upper sealed end of the bag.

Although the inner container may be used alone, my invention preferably contemplates its use with an outer supporting carton 22. This carton is made of a relatively heavy cardboard so that the entire package will be better able to withstand the shocks and strains encountered in ship ping and handling. 4

The outer carton is similar in shape to the conventional packing box, with the exception of the upper closure thereof. As will be explained, the upper flaps of the carton 22 are constructed to form a support for the spout 16 of the inner container [2. Referring to Fig. 6, it may be seen that the carton 22 has two pairs of lower flaps 24, 26, 28 and 3B which form the bottom of the carton.

At the upper end or closure of the carton are two flaps 34, 36, having reentrant portions 31, 38 respectively cut therein. The closure includes in addition an tinuation of the sides 40, 4| of the carton. It is this angular flap which serves as a support for the pouring spout 16 (see Fig. 1). It is to be noted that the corner or apex 42 of the flap 39 is not severed, as is the case with the other flaps 34, 36. Ifdesired, the corner 42 may be reinforced to prevent its splitting or tearing as the result of frequent folding of the flap 39. A diagonal crease 45 is made in the flap in order closed position. flap to a oin sides 40, 4| of carton completely This crease extends across the 46 at the upper junction of the assembled.

As has heretofore been mentioned, my package may be used with fiuids which are to befrozen therein. In such instances, because of the likelihood of condensation of moisture on the outangular flap 39 which is a conside of the bag l2, it is advisable to use a linin ill (see Fig. 2) within the outer carton. This lining may be made of corrugated paper or other absorbent material. It is further advisable where condensation of moisture within the carton is likely to occur, to employ staples 52 rather than lue in assembling or fastening the carton.

Inasmuch as the inner container or bag l2 must of necessity belly outwardly when it is filled, it is desirable to make the bag l2 almost twice the length and width of the outer carton 22 with which it is to be used. An ideal relationship in the size of the bag and carton is shown in a comparison of Fig. 3 with the carton in Fig. 2.

Referring now to Fig. 2, the complete package when ready for use is composed of the outer carton 22, the linin 50 and the bag l2. When the bag is placed within the carton, as shownin Fig. '7, it is contemplated that the spout IE will be placed adjacent the corner 42 of the flap 39. It is advisable to make the spout of such a length that it will extend slightly beyond the edge of the flap 39 when the bag I2 is entirely filled.

The operation and use of my package is as follows: After the bag i2 is placed within the carton 22, the bag is filled with whatever substance it is intended to hold. The filling of the bag may be easily and quickly accomplished simply by inserting a filling nozzle or hose (not shown) into the spout l6. After the bag l2 has been filled, the flap 34 of the outer carton is folded to the position shown in Fig. 8 where it will bear against the upper end of the lining 50. Next the flap 36 is folded over the flap 34 and the two are stapled together, by means of a staple 53 as illustrated in Fig. 9. It is to be noted that the corner 54 formed by the reentrant portions of the overlapping flaps 34, 36, is rounded. The package thus formed, and shown in Fig. 1, provides a novel and useful container from which material can be easily poured. Inasmuch as the flaps 34, 3B are stapled together, the bag I2 is thereby held securely within the carton 22 wthout danger of becoming displaced during the pouring operation. It will be seen that the corner 42 of the flaps 39 serves as a support upon which the flexible spout l6 rests while the contents of the package are being poured. In the same manner, the corner 42 likewise serves as a support for the spout during a filling operation. It is possible, although not necessary, to attach the spout IE to the flap 39 more permanently by means of glue.

A further feature of my invention is found in the closure wherein the outer carton 22 acts upon and cooperates with the spout iii to seal the contents of the bag l2 when the carton is closed and sealed. It may be seen in Fig. 10 that when the flap 39 is folded downward and inward along the diagonal crease 45, the inner side of the flap 39 is brought to bear against the spout l6 whereby the spout is folded over and compressed tightly against the flap 36, and is thereby sealed. When the bag 12 is used with fluids, it may be advisable to heat-seal the end i of the spout l6 before compressing it against the flap 36. On the other hand, when the package is used with freely flowing solids, such as grain and the like, it will not be necessary to heat-seal the spout. The closure is completed by bending the remaining part of the flap 39 to the position shown in Fig: 11, whereupon the entire package may be finally sealed with 4 gummed tape or by any other conventional means.

when my package is used with frozen fluids, it may be assembled and filled at the point of origin with the fluid contents, then frozen, and shipped in a refrigeratedcondition. Upon reaching the consumer, the contents are permitted to thaw, after which they may be easily poured. Should the consumer not wish to use the entire contents at one time, the package may be quickly sealed merely by closing the flaps over the spout, as described.

Because my package is rectangular in shape, it consumes a minimum of space in proportion to its cubic capacity. It has the additional advantage of being easily disposable, or it may be re-used, if desired. An additional advantage lies in the fact that the package can be shipped in great quantities in a knocked down condition and assembled at the point of use.

While I have described my invention in connectlon with a preferred embodiment thereof, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that numerous variations and modifications may be made from the structure disclosed without departing from the underlying principles of my invention. I therefore wish to include within the scope of the following claims all constructions by which substantially the results of my invention may be obtained by substantially the same or equivalent means.

Having illustrated and explained typical embodiments of my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is as follows:

1. A package comprising a flexible inner container having a spout thereon, an outer reinforcing carton having a plurality of sides, a closure for said package comprising a plurality of flaps hinged to the top edge of adjacent sides of said carton, at least one of said flaps having a reentrant portion therein through which said spout is adapted to protrude, another of said flaps comprising an extension of at least two of the side walls of said carton and forming an angular flap for supporting said spout, said angular flap having a diagonal crease therein extending from an edge thereof to an upper junction of two of said side walls, said diagonal crease being adapted to permit inward folding of said angular flap, said angular flap being adapted to compress said spout against one of said first mentioned flaps, thereby sealing said inner container.

2. A package comprising a flexible inner container having a spout thereon, an outer reinforcing carton having a plurality of sides, a closure for said package comprising a plurality of flaps hinged to the top edges of adjacent sides of the carton, one of said flaps comprising an extension of two adjacent side walls of the carton and forming a unitary angular fiap when in open position for supporting said spout in the trough formed at the junction of the two walls of the flap. another flap of the closure having a notch which is disposed adjacent said junction of the angular flap walls when said other flap is in closed position, said notch being dimensioned to accommodate the spout and serving to retain it adjacent the trough of the angular flap, and said angular flap being creased for collapse into closed position over said other flap in a plane substantially perpendicular to the side walls of the carton.

3. A package comprising a flexible inner container having a spout thereon, an outer reinforcing carton having a plurality of sides, a closure for said package comprising a plurality of flaps hinged to the top edges of adjacent sides of the carton, one of said flaps comprising an extension of two adjacent side walls of the carton andof the angular flap walls, said opening being dimensioned to accommodate the spout while dimensioned to accommodate the spout while said second flaps retain the main body of the inner container in the carton, said angular flap having said other flaps retain the main body of the inner container in the carton, and said angular flap being creased for collapse into closed position over said other flaps in a plane substantially perpendicular to the side walls of the carton.

4. A package comprising a flexible inner container having a spout thereon, an outer reinforcing carton having a plurality of sides, a closure for said package comprising a plurality of flaps hinged to the top edges of adjacent sides of the carton, one of said flaps comprising an extension of two adjacent side walls of the carton and forming a unitary angular flap when in open position for supporting said spout in the trough formed at the junction of the two walls of the flap, the closure including at least two other flaps extending respectively from different sides of the carton, folded one over the other in closed position and secured together, the outlines of said flaps forming an opening adjacent said junction of the angular flap walls, said opening being a diagonal crease therein extending from an edge thereof to an upper junction of two of said side walls, said diagonal crease being adapted to permit inward folding of said other flaps with the spout compressed between said other flaps and the angular flap, thus sealing the inner container. 7

LOUIS B. SMITH.

. REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 717,674 Hafer Jan. 7, 1903 925,535 Tyson June 22, 1909 1,092,148 Jones Apr. 7, 1914 1,833,675 Geimer Nov. 24, 1931 2,089,483 Jaenicke Aug. 10, 1937 2,151,202 Guyer Mar. 21, 1939 2,162,258 Hultin June 13, 1939 2,171,717 Vogt Sept. 5, 19.39 2,189,174 Hohl Feb, 6, 1940 2,192,722 Vogt Mar. 5, 1940 2,216,527 Weiss et a1.- Oct. 1, 1940 2,292,658 Palmer Aug, 11, 1942 2,293,182 Vogt Aug. 18, 1942 FOREIGN PATENTS I Number Country Date 462,928 Great Britain Mar. 18, 1937 605,183

angular flap over said France Feb. 13, 1926

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US717674 *Feb 24, 1902Jan 6, 1903Edward HaferTobacco-pouch.
US925535 *Aug 13, 1908Jun 22, 1909Otis R TysonPackage.
US1092148 *Dec 7, 1912Apr 7, 1914American Can CoPaper-walled container vessel or package.
US1833675 *Apr 6, 1931Nov 24, 1931Bemis Bro Bag CoContainer
US2089483 *Jan 17, 1936Aug 10, 1937Jaenicke William HPackage and method of making the same
US2151202 *Sep 2, 1937Mar 21, 1939Waldorf Paper Prod CoReclosing carton
US2162258 *Nov 17, 1936Jun 13, 1939Pneumatic Scale CorpPaper bag
US2171717 *Oct 8, 1935Sep 5, 1939Owens Illinois Glass CoCollapsible container
US2189174 *Dec 30, 1936Feb 6, 1940Owens Illinois Glass CoContainer
US2192722 *Mar 25, 1936Mar 5, 1940Owens Illinois Glass CoCollapsible container
US2216527 *Aug 23, 1938Oct 1, 1940Robert Gair Co IncPaperboard container and method of making same
US2292653 *Jul 1, 1940Aug 11, 1942Sealtest IncPackage
US2293182 *Feb 23, 1939Aug 18, 1942Clarence W VogtShipping and dispensing container
FR605183A * Title not available
GB462928A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2646044 *Nov 16, 1948Jul 21, 1953Samuel L DiackCollapsible bottle
US2663461 *Jun 30, 1949Dec 22, 1953Frederick M TurnbullContainer for pharmaceuticals and the like
US2665033 *Sep 14, 1950Jan 5, 1954Edwin J RobertsonCollapsible dispensing tube and closure therefor
US2801577 *May 3, 1954Aug 6, 1957Ingham Charles WMoisture resistant carton
US2861718 *Apr 6, 1956Nov 25, 1958Winzen Res IncDispensing container
US2898027 *Dec 4, 1956Aug 4, 1959Scholle Chemical CorpContainer for fluent materials
US2933229 *May 28, 1958Apr 19, 1960Monte BriceMilk, oil and fruit container
US2950037 *Aug 9, 1957Aug 23, 1960Plastus SaPackages for liquid, pasty and pulverulent materials
US2954901 *Oct 29, 1956Oct 4, 1960Hedwin CorpComposite package
US2998340 *Apr 4, 1957Aug 29, 1961Bemis Bro Bag CoBags
US3003681 *Sep 8, 1958Oct 10, 1961Orsini ReneContainers constructed of deformable material
US3007608 *Jul 25, 1956Nov 7, 1961Jr Herbert F CoxLiquid dispensing containers
US3051304 *Feb 29, 1960Aug 28, 1962Dolgorukov Gregory SPackage or similar article
US3051605 *Nov 20, 1958Aug 28, 1962Forrest B StannardMethod of making valved bags from extruded thermoplastic materials
US3063614 *Jul 25, 1961Nov 13, 1962Orsini ReneVolumetrically deformed flat sachet having at least one flat face
US3081003 *Jun 2, 1959Mar 12, 1963Continental Can CoContainer for liquid
US3089622 *Jan 7, 1959May 14, 1963Westlake Jr Edward BContainer for liquids
US3117695 *May 19, 1960Jan 14, 1964Inland Container CorpFluid dispensing container
US3137419 *Jul 24, 1961Jun 16, 1964Robert E DavyCollapsible liquid container with retractable spout
US3138293 *Mar 15, 1961Jun 23, 1964Scholle Container CorpPaperboard dispensing container
US3139227 *Apr 17, 1961Jun 30, 1964Dorfman Jerome JContainer
US3184117 *Sep 26, 1962May 18, 1965Container CorpBag-in-box arrangement for packaging and dispensing of liquids
US3198390 *Apr 30, 1962Aug 3, 1965John H BeckmanInsulated container having a disposable bag therein anchored to its discharge tube
US3208661 *Oct 26, 1962Sep 28, 1965Union Carbide CorpFlexible bag
US3240416 *Jan 12, 1961Mar 15, 1966Dow Chemical CoLined dispensing carton
US3249283 *Jul 6, 1964May 3, 1966Riegel Paper CorpCondensable carton
US3309008 *Jun 23, 1964Mar 14, 1967Charles M HuckBedside and portable drainage collector
US3506180 *Oct 31, 1967Apr 14, 1970Universal Container U K LtdStorage and transport containers
US4382538 *Sep 26, 1980May 10, 1983St. Regis Paper CompanyValved lined container
US4911562 *Mar 14, 1988Mar 27, 1990Adriano MazzeschiCollapsible can with a handle arrangement for pouring the liquid held therein
US4998646 *Mar 23, 1989Mar 12, 1991Colgate-Palmolive Co.Flexible pouch contoured to facilitate pouring
US5005734 *Mar 23, 1989Apr 9, 1991Colgate-Palmolive CompanyFlexible pouch with reinforcement to facillitate pouring
US5096306 *Sep 5, 1989Mar 17, 1992Tetra Pak AbPackage
US5165801 *Oct 28, 1991Nov 24, 1992Ab Akerlund & RausingPackage
US5505305 *Jan 24, 1994Apr 9, 1996Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMoisture-proof resealable pouch and container
US5687848 *Jun 5, 1995Nov 18, 1997Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMoisture-proof resealable pouch and container
US5704480 *Jun 7, 1995Jan 6, 1998Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMoisture-proof resealable pouch and container
US6120181 *Jan 27, 1999Sep 19, 2000A. R. Arena Products, Inc.Pillow bag with integral filling conduit
US6340088 *Jul 1, 1999Jan 22, 2002Murata Manufacturing Co., Ltd.Storage container for electronic components
US6427873Jan 18, 2001Aug 6, 2002A. R. Arena Products, Inc.Method and apparatus for enhancing evacuation of bulk material shipper bags
US7097092 *Aug 2, 2002Aug 29, 2006Ralcorp Holding, Inc.Package for food products
US7565987 *Aug 31, 2005Jul 28, 2009Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Pull tab activated sealed packet
US7798711Jul 27, 2004Sep 21, 2010Cdf CorporationFlexible liner for FIBC or bag-in-box container systems
US8075188Feb 24, 2006Dec 13, 2011Cdf CorporationFlexible liner for FIBC or bag-in-box container systems with improved flex crack resistance
US8182152Mar 28, 2006May 22, 2012Cdf CorporationFlexible liner for FIBC or bag-in-box container systems with improved tensile strength
US8567660Nov 17, 2009Oct 29, 2013Cdf CorporationSustainable packaging system for shipping liquid or viscous products
US9016555Apr 2, 2008Apr 28, 2015Cdf CorporationFlexible liner and bag-in-box container systems
US9120608Apr 27, 2010Sep 1, 2015Cdf CorporationSustainable packaging system for shipping liquid or viscous products
US9346612Sep 15, 2010May 24, 2016Cdf CorporationFlexible liner for FIBC or bag-in-box container systems
US20050269388 *Sep 8, 2003Dec 8, 2005Arsuaga Eguizabal Juan JBag for storing and dispensing granular, powdery or liquid products and production method thereof
US20060023973 *Jul 27, 2004Feb 2, 2006James PlunkettFlexible liner for FIBC or bag-in-box container systems
US20070045341 *Aug 31, 2005Mar 1, 2007Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Pull tab activated sealed packet
DE8807593U1 *Jun 10, 1988Sep 8, 1988Indag Gesellschaft Fuer Industriebedarf Mbh, 6900 Heidelberg, DeTitle not available
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/117.34, 229/138, 222/107, 229/117.28, 229/117.3, 222/529, 383/906
International ClassificationB65D5/60
Cooperative ClassificationY10S383/906, B65D5/60
European ClassificationB65D5/60