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Publication numberUS2448830 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 7, 1948
Filing dateApr 15, 1947
Priority dateApr 15, 1947
Also published asDE974863C
Publication numberUS 2448830 A, US 2448830A, US-A-2448830, US2448830 A, US2448830A
InventorsBlakely Robert T, Robbins Joseph J
Original AssigneeIbm
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Record sensing and comparing means
US 2448830 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 7, 1948. J. J. ROBBINS ET AL 2,443,830

RECORD SENSING AND COMPARING MEANS Filed April 15, 1947 S Sheets-Sheet l 77M/N6 CHART 356 110W ll SHIT/i lf/flfAlv I I27 VI in {an mun n 0 l I u n 2 i i n 3 I? I] 4 H 5 n on 6 ,n I n 7 I v g l 0| no 15. z. 1 l I. I 605.] 5 l0 I5 20 25 INVENTORS Jose/w J Rosa/Ms BY ROBERT 7. BLAKELY ATTORNEY Sept. 7, 1948. J. J. ROBBINS ETAL RECORD SENSING AND COMPARING MEANS 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 15, 1947 5V: ma 8 K 2 0 n mil m HT a Mg CJ 0 B A w w w Y B 0 OJ 5 A Z w 1 c 0 u 5 \Z IUNc I i P 1943- J. J. ROBBINS ET AL 2,448,830

RECORD SENSING AND COMPARING MEANS INVENTORS JOSEPH J Roam/vs BY ROBERT I BLAKELY ATTORNEY Patented Sept. 7, 1948 RECORD SENSING AND COMPARING MEANS Joseph J. Robbins, New York, and Robert T.

Blakely, Amityville, N. Y., assignors to International Business Machines Corporation, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application April 15, 1947, Serial No. 741,644

7 Claims. (Cl. 250-415) This invention relates to record controlled machines and particularly to sensing and comparing means for data designated on the records.

Comparison of data on records serves various functions in record controlled machines. For instance, in tabulators the comparison of group designating data on records controls interruption of record feed and initiation of total-taking. In collators, comparison of data controls sorting of the records. Heretofore, a separate sensing assembly was used for each record to enter into the comparison. Comparison of data on a plurality of records was accomplished by coordinating connections between the separate sensing assemblies. In electrically operated record-controlled machines, such coordinating connections took the form of circuits with relays controlled by the separate sensing assemblies.

The present invention is directed to and has for its general object the simplification of the sensing and comparing means through the provision of a single sensing assembly or unit for the plurality of records to be compared, with such single sensing unit also serving in itself as comparing means.

More specifically, the invention is directed to and has as an object the provision of a single sensing unit of the optical type to sense and compare data on a plurality of record cards.

According to the invention, the single sensing unit for a plurality of record cards provides a single ray of light which directly and by reflection scans the plurality of record cards concurrently for data. For corresponding columns of the plurality of records, a single photocell sufilces to respond to the light scanning such columns concurrently. Agreement or disagreement of data in the corresponding columns is manitested by the selective energization of the photocell, Hence, the single sensing unit not only incorporates provisions for scanning corresponding columns of a plurality of record cards concurrently for data but also incorporates comparison means for such data.

Another object of the invention is to provide a single sensing and comparing unit for a plurality of records to function for sensing and comparin data represented on the records according to a single-point or combinational-point code.

Data are represented in columns of a record by selectively perforating index positions thereof according to a chosen code. Numerals are usuually represented in the single-point code, by selectively perforating so-called 0, 1,2, 9 index positions of a column. Alphabetic data are usually represented in the combinational-point code, by selective combinations of perforations in la dex positions 1, 2, 9 and index positions 0, 11, and 12.

In the simplest form of the invention, the circuits are arranged for the sensing and comparing of single-point codally represented data on the records. In each machine cycle, records to be sensed and compared will be fed to spaced sensing stations. A single sensing and comparing unit including a photo-sensitive element and an optical system will sense and compare the data on the records at the spaced stations. The optical system which includes projecting and refleeting elements will direct a single ray of light successively upon corresponding index positions of the records at the spaced stations. The ray of light will be directed through perforations in the corresponding index positions upon the photosensitive element, activating it as a manifestation of data agreement. If any of the corresponding index positionsis blank. it will divert the light ray from the photo-sensitive element, so it will remain unactivated upon a disagreement of data. In this application, the records of the same run all will bear single-point or numerical data to be sensed and compared.

Elements are provided which may be placed in the circuit for controlling the machine according to sensing and comparing of combinational codal data. Repeat activations of the photo-sensitive element will be effected in a cycle as a manifestation of data agreement. In this application,. the records of the same run all bear combinational codal or alphabetic data to be sensed and compared.

The invention also provides an alternately effective optical system for activating a photo-sensitive element only upon the sensing of a disagreement of data. This form of the. invention is applicable to the sensing and comparison oi both single and combinational-point codal data and records bearing either type of data may be included in the same run. When this form of the invention is used, the index points of the record columns to be sensed and compared should.

referably not be printed on or otherwise ob scured. Further, the surfaces of the records should be white and glossy since these surfaces themselves will serve as light reflecting means.

The records may take the form of individual cards or of sections of a tape or film. Since a perforation in a record is a light-pervious poini, it may be referred to assuch in the specification and claims. Obviously, in place of perforations.

3 equivalent light-pervious points may be applied to index positions to designate data. we

Other objects of the invention will be pointed out in the following description and .claims and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, which disclose, by way of examples, the principle cgi the invention and the best mode, which has "been contemplated, of applying that principle.

The invention will be disclosed as applied, for example, to the card-controlled machine which is the subject matter of Patent No. 2,364,188. Only as much of this machine as is necessary to understand the invention will be referred to herein.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a partly diagrammatic section through the card handling portion of the machine, showing the sensing and the comparing means which is the subject matter of the present invention.

Fig. 2 shows a fragment of a record card.

Fig. 3 is a timing chart of pertinent contacts.

Fig. 4 is a circuit diagram.

Figs. 5 to 8 are diagrammatic views pertaining to different conditions of agreement and disagreement of data on a pair of record cards.

Referring to Fig. l, the cards to be operated on are stacked in hopper 3|. A conventional picker feeds one card each card cycle out of the hopper. Successive pairs of feed rolls 33 and 34 then advance the card during successive card cycles to the delivery hopper 32. The picker and feed rolls are driven only during card cycles through a one-revolution clutch (not shown) which is engaged by energization of a. clutch magnet 28 (Fig. 4) and disengaged by deenergization of the magnet. During a card cycle, the picker 35 feeds the bottom card out of hopper 3i to the first set of feed rolls 33 and 34. By the end of the cycle, the card is advanced to a position in which its leading edge just reaches a first sensing station, defined hereby the neck or constricted portion of an aperture A. In the next cycle, the card is fed across the aperture A to a, position in which its leading edge just reaches a second sensing station, defined hereby the neck of an aperture B. Meanwhile the following card is advanced to aperture A. In the succeeding cycle, the leading card is fed across aperture B and delivered to hopper 32 while the following card is fed across the aperture A. The cards are fed in synchronism so that as the index positions 9 to 0, 11 and 12 of the leading card successively traverse the aperture B, the same index positions of the trailing card traverse the aperture A, with corresponding positions concurrently crossing the respective apertures. It may be mentioned that the first card fed out of hopper 3| to the aperture A closes card lever contacts 4| (Fig. 4) near the end of the first card cycle, and at a similar time in the next card cycle, the card closes card lever contacts 42 (Fig. 4) as it is fed to aperture B.

In machines of this type, card feed and initiation of total taking are controlled by comparison of group data on the record cards. When the card traversing aperture A has group data different than the group data on the card traversing aperture B, the sensing and comparing means detects the disagreement of group data and brings auto-control means into operation for interrupting card feed and initiating total-taking. One or more card columns may be assigned to the group designating function.

The sensing and comparing means includes a single light ray projector L which throws a concentrated band of parallel rays of light upon the constricted center of aperture B. Assuming no cards are present at apertures A and B, then, as indicated in Fig. 1, the light band passes to a mirror M which reflects the light to a mirror Mi. Mirror Ml re-directs the light through aperture A.

The thin rectangle of light projected upon the neck 01 aperture B has a width; i. e., dimension across the machine, suflicient to scan all the card columns and a length; i. e., dimension in the direction of card feed, equal to or slightly less than the length of a perforation in an index position of the card. The apertures A and B each have a width substantially equal to that of the light beam and a length slightly less than that of an index position of the card. The width of the reflecting surfaces oi mirrors M and Ml is at least equal to that of the aperture. Two other sets of mirrors, MN and MK are provided. Each of mirrors MN and MK has a reflecting surface equal to or slightly less in width than the transverse dimension of a data designating perforation. There is one mirror MN and one mirror MK for each pair of corresponding card columns of the pair of records to be sensed and compared for group data. A suitable arrangement 01 mirrors MN and MK is indicated in Fig. 1. The mirrors MKa and MNa are positioned respectively to receive a light ray reflected from a column of the card at station A or passing through a perioration in this card column and to re-direct the light tophotocell Ka or Na, respectively. A light ray passing through a, perforation in the adjacent card column or reflectedirom a blank index position of this column will go directly to photocell Nb 0r Kb, respectively. 'A light ray reflected from or passing through an index position of the next column will strike and be reflected by mirrors MKc and We to photocells Kc and Ne, respectively. This arrangement may be repeated for every three card columns. The optical system further includes a pair of mirrors M2 and M3, each of the same eil'ective width as mirror M or Ml. For a reason explained later, mirror M2 is hinged so that it may be swung into operative position against a stop I0 or into inactive position against a stop H.

An analysis will be given below of the working of the optical system with respect to four possible conditions and, for the sake of discussion, it will be assumed mirror M2 is in operative position and that the card columns under consideration are those to which the mirrors MNa and MKa are related.

Case 1-A perforation in the card traversing the second sensing station is crossing aperture B while a like data perforation is traversing aperture A, a condition denoted in Fig. 5. The perforation at aperture B passes a ray of light from projector L to mirror M which reflects it to morror Mi, in turn directing the light ray through the perforation at aperture A to the mirror MNa. The mirror MNa directs the light ray to photocell Na. Thus, energization of a photocell N is a manifestation of agreement of data designating points in corresponding columns of the leading and trailing cards.

Case 2A perforation in the leading card is crossing aperture B while the trailing card does not have a corresponding perforation at aperture A, a condition denoted in Fig. 6. The ray of light passed by the perforation at aperture B to mirror M is reflected to mirror Mi from which it is refiected to the aperture A. The unperforated index position at the aperture A reflects the light, in

the manner of a mirror, to the mirror MKa' which directs the light to photocell Ka.

Case 3A perforation in the trailing card is crossing aperture A but there is no corresponding perforation-in the leading card, a case denoted in Fig. '7. A light ray from proiector L is reflected, as from a mirror, by the unperforated index-positlon at aperture B, to mirror M2. Mirror M2 reflects the light my tomirror Ml which directs the light through the card perforation at aperture A to'the mirror MKa which, in turn, reflects the light to photocell Ka.

Thus, in cases 2 and 3, a photocell K is'en'ergized as a manifestation of disagreement'of group towards aperture A. The unperforated index po-.

sition-at aperture A reflects the light ray to mir-T ror MNa which directs the light-upon photo cell Na.

Thus, in cases 1 and 4,, a photocell N is energlzed and the corresponding photocell K is not energized, as a result of agreement of perforations or of blank index positions in the leading and trailing cards. In cases 2 and 3, photocellv K is energized while photocell N is not energized, as a result of disagreement of designations in the leading and trailing cards.

Further explanation of the sensing and comparing means will be given in the description of the circuits shown in Fig. 4. These circuits have eleinents common to circuits shown in the aforementioned patent but thecircuits here are revised to flt the requirements of the present sensing and comparing means and to omit elements unnecessary to an understanding of the present invention.

- Switch I00 is closed to place power, from a D. C.

source, upon opposite circuit lines In and I02 To start operations, the operator depresses a start keyto close start key contacts 240, establishing a circuit from line Isl through auto-control relay contacts Pl, the start key contacts 240 and total cycle cam contacts T8, through card teed clutch magnet 28 and a relay Q, in parallel with magnet 2|, and thence to line I92. The first card feed cycle follows. During this cycle, the first card is fed to the aperture A, meanwhile closing card lever contacts 4|. Closure of contacts 4! completes a circuit through a relay coil F. A stick circuit for c'oil F is made, when contacts ll open between cards, via contacts Fl and CF3. Coil F also closes contacts F2 which establish a shunt circuit around start key contacts 240, as follows: Line .i 9 l, normally-closed contacts Pi, now-closed contacts F2, stop key contacts 2"] and nowclosed contacts Ql, thence through magnet 28 and coil Q, in parallel, to line I92. During the next cycle, the first card traverses the first sensing station. Near the end of this cycle, card lever contacts 42 are closed to complete the circuit of relay N. Contacts Ni close and together with cam contacts CF! which close during the period between cards when card lever contacts 42 open, provide a stick circuit for coil N. Coil N also closes contacts N2 which are in parallel with contacts F2 to provide an additional stick circuit for clutch magnet 28 and coil Q. In the later portion of the cycle in which the last card traverses the second open during a total-taking cycle to and of coil Q'breaks. Card feed operation will then be stopped at the end of the cycle.

-It may be mentioned that c'am contacts '1! h prevent the start-key circuit from being eflective. I 4 Auto-control operation may be placed under control of photocells K or photocells N. The

photocells K and N relating to a'single pair of corresponding card columns are both connected at one-side to an amplifier AMP; If photocell K is to be utilized, then the opposite side of-tli-ls photocell is connected via a switch 8 to the ainplifier, but if photocell N-is to be utilized, the switch 3 is reversed to connect the opposite side or the photocellN to the amplifier. For the=sake of simplicity, only the photocells Ka, Na, K!) and Nb-and related amplifiers 1 and 2 for two pairs (at-corresponding. columns to be sensed and comparedare's'hown' in Fig. 4, but it will be under- 7 stood that duplicate arrangements are provided tively placing the auto-control operation under control of-photocells N according to the sensing "and comparing of single-point, numerical data, or under control of photocells N according-to the considered first. Assume that the columns to be of a duo-wound relay IU and similar plug connection is made between amplifier 2 and coil p of relay 2U. Other plugging is between sockets I51 and sockets I"; also between sockets NS and socket 1. Prior to starting operations, the

tive position for a reason made clear soon. In the manner explained before, operations are started to feedthe records.

During the third card cycle from the start, one card is traversing the-second sensing station while the next card is traversing the first sensing station.- "At this time, the card lever relays F and N are bothenergized and have closed contacts F3 and N3. The amplifiers will thereby be'conditioned for operation by a circuit from line ISI, via cam contacts CFIO, and relay contacts F3 and N3, through the amplifiers in parallel, and to line I82. "Activation of a photocell No by light will then be effective to cause the amplifier i to apply energizing potential via sockets 550 and I, thence via plugwires (not shown) and sockets I54 and II! to the coil p of relay, IU. Contacts iUa close to complete a circuit through the hold coil 11. of relay IU, this circuit being from line Iii via cam contacts CFI, contacts iUa, through cqii h, to line "2. Coil IU shifts its contacts'b to prevent a circuit being established through auto-control auaeso 7 relay coil P via the lower side of these contacts. Similarly, activation of photocellNb during the cycle causes relay 2U to -.be effective to shift its b contacts. Thus, as long as agreeing perforations occur in corresponding columns of the leading and trailing cards respectively crossing apertures 13 and A, photocells N for these columns are activated. Clearly, then, if there is no change in group designations, all the plugged-in b contacts of relays U will have been shifted to prevent energization of auto-start coil P. It becomes clear now why, with the plugging for this first case, photocells N are utilized only for single-point,

numerical group designation sensing and com-W" paring and why mirror M2 is in'inactive position. If lvf2 were inoperative position, the photocells'N' would be energized by corresponding blank index positions of the cards at some time during the cycle. As a result, contacts b of relays U would be shifted to prevent pick-up of coil P regardless of whether or not agreeing perforations were subsequently sensed. Also, with the circuits plugged as described above, it is not intended to compare combinational-point, alphabetic data because the agreement of the first pair of perforations in corresponding columns will cause the relay U relating to these columns to be picked up and held, and a possible disagreement in subsequent index positions will have no eil'ect.

If a disagreement in numeric group designating perforations occurs in any pair of corresponding card columns at the first and second sensing stations, then the related photocell N is not activated during the cycle. Accordingly, the contacts b of one of the relays U will not be shifted. A circuit will then be established upon closure of cam contacts CFI3 at "13 of the cycle, from line I92 through coil P, a socket I51. the socket I56 plugged thereto, the normally closed side of contacts b of a deenergized relay U, the connected socket 566, the socket 561 plugged thereto, thence via cam contacts CFI3, the card lever relay contacts N5 (now closed), and via cam contacts CFI to line ISI. Coil P, being energized, closes contacts P2 to complete a stick circuit for the coil from line I9I via cam contacts TII, relay contacts P2 and coil P to line I92. The cam contacts TII will open, in the ensuing total cycle,.to drop relay P.

Coil P, being energized, opens contacts PI, breaking the circuit of clutch magnet 28 and relay Q. With magnet 28 deenergized,'the card feed clutch (not shown) will be disengaged at the end of the cycle in which the disagreement of group designations occurred. A total taking cycle may then be initiated in the manner described in the aforementioned patent.

Application of the invention to the sensing and comparing of numerical group data only on a run of records has been explained. The application of the. invention to the sensing and comparing of alphabetic data only will next be described. In this application, photocells N are again switched into circuit with their amplifiers. The alphabetic code considered here as an example, is the twohole code (see Fig. 2) wherein a perforation in one of index positions 1 to 9 and a perforation in one of index positions 0, 11, and 12 combine to designate a character. Agreement of such alphabetic data will be manifested by repeat activations of the photocells N during a record cycle.- -The first activation will pick up a relay U. The second activation will pick up a companion relay UN. The plugging for this case is as follows: From outlet socket 55I of amplifier I to socket I55 which 8 leads to one side of relay IU and also is wired to one side of companion relay IUN; from outlet socket B" of amplifier I to a socket 514 which connects to one of the brushes S" of a distributor CD2. The other brush of the distributor is wired to a plug socket 516 which, for this case, is plugged to socket I". Socket 814 also is connected via a distributor EMI to the coil p of relay IUN. The distributors CD2 and EMI are similar to the like designated elements disclosed in the aforementioned Patent 2,364,188. Distributors CD2 make at the 9, 8, 7 1 times of a cycle.

Distributors EMI make at 0, 11, and 12 cyclic times. The arrangement described above enables the amplifier I, upon activation of photocell No, to pick up relay IU at the 9, 8 1 cyclic times and to pick up relay IUN at the 0, 11 or 12 cyclic time. A similar arrangement, including plugging and distributors, associates amplifier 2 with relays 2U and 2UN. The remaining plugging for the case under discussion is from a socket I" to a socket 518, from a socket 518 to a socket I", from a socket III to a socket 522, and finally from a socket mx to a socket I")! which is wired via relay contacts "lie to the cam contacts CFII. As in the previous case, the mirror M2 (Fig. 1) is set in its inactive position.

The agreement of perforations in index posisltlons 1 to 9 of corresponding columns of the records traversing stations A and B (Fig. 1) results in activation of photocells Na and Nb. Amplifiers I and '2 thereupon operate via distributors CD2 to pick up relays IU and 2U which are held via their a contacts and cam contacts CFI until "15" of the cycle (see Fig. 3). Relays IU and 2U respectively close their contacts lUcand 2Uc. The agreement of perforations in positions 0, 11, and 12 of the records results in repeat activations oi photocells Na an Nb. Ampllflers I and 2 thereupon act via distributors EM] to pick up relays IUN and 2UN which are held via their contacts a and cam contacts CFI until 15" of the cycle. Relays IUN and 2UN close their respective contacts IUNc and 2UNc.

' Cam contacts CF make shortly after 12 of a cycle and stay closed until 15. If agreement of the alphabetic group designations has been sensed in a cycle, the contacts 0 of relays U and UN are all closed. A circuit will then make from line ISI -via CFH, plugging between 511 and 51!, thence via contacts IUc and IUNc to socket l'l9,'plugwire (not shown) to socket 580,

thence via contacts 2Uc and 2UNc to socket "I. The circuitis completed via the plugging between sockets ill and 582, through relay 590, to line I82. Relay 590 opens its contacts 590a to prevent auto-control relay P from being energized when cam contacts CFI 3 close. If there has been a disagreement in alphabetic group designations, at least one of the contacts IUc, 2Uc, IUNc and 2UNc will not be in closed status. Relay 580 will not be energized and contacts 590a will remain closed to allow coil P to be energized. As in the preceding case, energization of coil P causes the card feed to be interrupted.

The invention provides for the sensing and comparing of alphabetic and numeric group data on the same run of cards. For this third case, the photocells K are utilized. The plugging is from sockets 550 and I to sockets I54 and I, respectively. As in the first described case, the sockets I51 are plugged to sockets Ill. Further plugging is from sockets 585 to socket 561. For this third case, the mirror M2 (Fig. 1) is set in active position.

As described before, a photocell K will be actlvated only if a pair of corresponding columns of cards traversing the first and second sensing station do not present perforations concurrently at apertures A and B. Whenever such disagreement occurs in any of the index positions 9 to 0, 11 and 12, photocell K is activated. In the manner previously explained, the connected amplifier then will apply energizing potential to the coil p of a relay U. The coil )1. of the relay U will then be energized. The relay U will shift its contacts b, closing the upper side of these contacts. During the closed interval of cam contacts CFI3, coil P will be energized by a circuit such as previously traced except that the circuit this time extends through the upper, now-closed side of the relay contacts I) and through a plugwire (not shown) between socket 565 and socket 561.

While there have been shown and described and pointed out the fundamental novel features of the invention as applied to a preferred embodiment, it will be understood that various omisslons and substitutions and changes in the form and details of the device illustrated and in its operation may be made by those skilled in the art, without departing from the spirit of the invention. It is the intention, therefore, to be limited only as indicated by the scope of the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a machine having means to feed a plurallty of records concurrently to spaced sensing stations, respectively, where the records are to be sensed and compared for agreeing and disagreeing relations of data designating light-pervious points in index positions of the records; a single sensing and comparing unit for the records at the spaced stations, said unit including an optical system of light projecting and reflecting elements to direct a single ray of light successively upon corresponding index positions of the records at the spaced stations to pass through any of the latter index positions which bears a light-pervious point or to be deflected by any blank one of these index points, so that the op tical system in conjunction with the records at the spaced stations directs the ray of light into selective paths depending on agreeing or disagreeing relation of said corresponding index positions with respect to data designating lightpervious points, said unit further including a photo-sensitive element in one of said paths to be activated by the ray of light as a manifestation of one of asid relations, and a machine-controlling circuit selectively governed by the photosensitive eiement according to whether or not the photo-sensitive element has been activated.

2. In a machine having means to feed a pair of records concurrently to spaced sensing stations, respectively, where the records are to be sensed and compared for agreeing and disagreeing relations of data designating light-previous points in index positions of the records; a single sensing and comparing unit for the pair of records at the spaced stations, said unit including an optical system with means for directing a ray of light upon an index position of the record at one of said stations and through said index position if it bears a light-pervious point, said optical system including reflecting means to intercept the light my passed through said index position and to redirect the light ray upon the corresponding index position of the record at the other sensing station and through the latter index position if it bears a light-pervious point, said unit further including a photo-sensitive element to receive and be activated by the light ray after passing through the corresponding index positions of the pair of records,and a machine-controlling circuit selectively governed by the photo-sensitive element according to whether or not it has been activated and, hence, according to whether or not the data-designating light-pervious points are in agreement or in disagreement.

3. In a machine having means to feed a pair of records concurrently to a pair of spaced stations, respectively, to be sensed for agreement or disagreement of data designating light-pervious points in index positions of the records; a single sensing and comparing unit for the records at the pair of spaced stations, said unit including an optical system of light-projecting and reflecting parts arranged for directing a single ray of light successively upon corresponding index positions of the records at the spaced stations and into one ultimate path if said corresponding index positions both bear light-pervious points and into a diii'erent ultimate path upon deflection of the light ray by either of said index positions lacking a light-pervious point, said unit further including a lightsensitive element in the latter path to be activated by the light ray as a manifestation of disagreement of the data designating lightpervious points in the records at the spaced stations, and a machine-controlling circuit selectively governed by said photo-sensitive element according to whether or not it has been activated.

4. In a machine such as defined in claim 3, the light-projecting structure including a source of light and means for focusing a light ray from said source upon an index position of one of the records to pass through a light-pervious point in said index position and the reflecting structure including means to intercept the light ray passing through said point and to re-direct th light ray upon the corresponding index position of the other record to be deflected by the latter index position, if lacking a light-pervious point, into the path intercepted b said photo-sensitive element for activating the latter element.

5. In a machine such as defined in claim 3, the light-projecting structure including a source oi. light and means focusing a ray of light from said source upon an index position of the record at one of said stations to be deflected by said index position, if lacking a light-pervious point, and the reflecting structure including a reflecting element to intercept the light ray deflected by said index point and re-direct it to the corresponding index position of the record at the other station to pass through the latter index position, if bearing a light-pervious point, and into the path intercepted by the light-sensitive element for activating the latter element.

6. In a machine having means to feed successive records synchronously across successive sensing stations where the records are to be sensed and compared for agreement or disagreement of record group-designating light-pervious points in index positions of the successive records; a single sensing and comparing unit for the records at the successive stations and including a photo-sensitive element, a source of light, a projecting element for projecting light from said source through a light-pervious point in an index position of the record at one said station, reflecting means for intercepting the light passing through and re-directing the light upon the corresponding index position of the record at the other sensing station and thence, via a lightpervious point in the latter index position, upon said photo-sensitive element, so as to activate the photo-sensitive element upon agreement of group designating points in the corresponding index positions, the light being diverted from the photo-sensitive element by either of said corresponding index positions lacking a light-pervious point, and an autocontrol circuit selectively governed by the photo-sensitive element according to whether or not the photo-sensitive element has been activated. o

7. In a cyclically operating machine having means to ieed'a pair or records, durin a cycle, synchronously across spaced stations where the records are to be sensed and compared for agreement or disagreement oi combinations or data designating light-pervious points in index positions of corresponding columns of the records; a single sensing and comparing unit for the pair of records respectively traversing the spaced stations. said unit including a photo-sensitive element, a source or light, a projecting element for projecting a ray of iight'irom said source upon one of the stations to scan the index positions of 12 a column of the record successively as the record is fed across the latter station. reflecting means for intercepting the light my upon passing through a light-pervious point in an index position in the latter column and re-directing the light ray upon the corresponding index position. of the corresponding column of the record moving across the other station, and thence upon said photo-sensitive element via a light-pervious point in the latter index position, whereby the photo-sensitive element is activated upon each concurrence, during a cycle, of light-pervious points in corresponding index positions of corresponding columns of the pair of scanned records, the light being diverted from the photo-sensitive element by either .of said corresponding index positions, lacking a light-pervious point, and machine-controlling circuit means selectively controlled by said photo-sensitive element according to whether the photo-sensitive element has been operated once or a plurality of times during the cycle.

JOSEPH J. ROBBINS. ROBERT '1. BLAKELY.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
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US2482242 *Jun 9, 1948Sep 20, 1949Remington Rand IncCode selector
US2603151 *Nov 3, 1947Jul 15, 1952IbmRecord card sensing and analyzing means
US2605965 *May 15, 1950Aug 5, 1952O'd Shepherd JudsonData translator employing displaceable data cards
US2615626 *May 20, 1950Oct 28, 1952IbmRecord feeding and analyzing apparatus
US2617483 *Oct 8, 1947Nov 11, 1952Porter Donald CAutomatic electronic control mechanism
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Classifications
U.S. Classification250/555, 250/223.00R, 101/2, 235/458, 250/569, 250/208.4
International ClassificationB07C3/10, B07C3/14, G06K7/015, G06K7/01
Cooperative ClassificationB07C3/14, G06K7/015
European ClassificationB07C3/14, G06K7/015