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Publication numberUS2450165 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 28, 1948
Filing dateJun 3, 1943
Publication numberUS 2450165 A, US 2450165A, US-A-2450165, US2450165 A, US2450165A
InventorsTotal Charge List
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cash register
US 2450165 A
Abstract  available in
Images(9)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 28, 1948.

Filed June 3, 1943 FIGJ H. O. RANDALL ET AL CASH REGI STER 9 Sheets-Sheet 1 0 Sub 17.97

Q 0 UL 14.77 7102 F00 WW 0 Ch I 2 0 Sub 79.25

. IZIILEHT 40.47

Wm rm m LIB Misc.

Labor Wash T. &T.

5 Grease Df Tax [0 01.0 o. RANDALL AND an a. scans, oecsnsso av JOHN H. MORE AommsmATbn mvENToRs' B aw W3" THEIR ATTQRNEY 9 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 3

CASH REGISTER H. o. RANDALL ETAL Sept. 28, 1948.

Filed June s, 1943 FIG.4

HAROLD O. RANDALL AND JOHN B. GEERS, DECEASED BY JOHN H. MORE,

ADMINISTRATOR INVENTORS BY M THEIR ATTORNEY Sept. 28, 1948. I H. o. RANDALL HAL CASH REGISTER 9 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed June 3, 1943 pt 1948. H. o. RANDALL ETAL 2,450,165

CASH REGISTER Filed June 3, 1943 9 Sheets-Sheet 4 HAROLD O. RANDALL AND JOHN B. GEERS, DECEASED BY JOHN H. MORE, ADMINISTRATOR INVENTORS THEIR ATTORNEY Sept. 28, 1948. H. o. RANDALL ET AL CASH REGISTER Filed 'June 3, 1943 9 Sheets-Sheet 5 HAROLD O. RANDALL AND JOHN B. GEERS, DECEASED BY JOHN H. MORE, ADMINISTRATOR INVENTORS BY 4 W THEIR ATTORNEY Sept. 28, 1948. H. o. RANDALL ET'AL 2,450,165

CASH REGISTER Filed June 3, 1943 9 Sheets-Sheet 6 HAROLD O. RANDALL AND JOHN B. GEERS, DECEASED BY JOHN H. MORE, ADMINISTRATOR INVENTORS THEIR ATTORNEY Sept. 28, 1948. H. o. RANDALL ET AL 2,450,165

CASH REGISTER Filed June 5, 1943 9 Sheeis-Sheet '7 HAROLD 0. RANDALL AND JOHN B. GEERS, DECEASED BY JOHN H. MORE,

2H ADMINISTRATOR INVENTORS THEIR ATTORNEY Sept. 28, 1948. H. o. RANDALL ETAL CASH REGISTER 9 Sheets-Sheet 8 Filed June 3, 1943 HAROLD-O. RANDALL AND JOHN. B. GEERS, DECEASED BY JOHN H. MORE,

ADMINISTRATOR INVENTO R5 z wflfii THEIR ATTORNEY P 28, 1948- H. o. RANDALL ET AL 2,450,165

CASH REGISTER Filed June 3, 1943 9 Sheets-Sheet 9 HAROLD O. RANDALL AND JOHN B. GEERS, DECEASED BY' JOHN H. MORE,

ADMINISTRATOR INVENTORS THEIR ATTO RNEY Patented Sept. 28, 1948 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CASH REGISTER Application June 3, 1943, Serial No. 489,516

24 Claims.

The present invention relates to combined cash registers and adding machines and is particularly directed to novel means for controlling the engagement and disengagement of the totalizers and the actuators and for controlling the shifting of the totali-zers to effect selection thereof.

The machine to which the present invention is herein shown applied is of the type illustrated and described in the application for Letters Patent of the United States, Serial No. 430,214, filed February 10, 1942, by Edward J. Carey et al., for Cash registers (Patent No. 2,443,652 dated June 23, 1948). Such machine also embodies features disclosed in United States Patent No. 2,286,116 for ash registers, which issued on June 9, 1942, to Bernis M. Shipley, and the United States Patent No. 1,693,279, issued on November 27, 1928, to Walter J. Kreider.

It is a primary object of the invention to pro- Vide novel means for controlling the shifting of the totalizers to effect the proper selection thereof when the machine is used either as a cash re ister or an adding machine.

Another object of the invention is to provide novel means for controlling the shifting of the t-otalizers and the selective engagement and disen agement of the totalizers and amount actuators to clear an amount from one totalizer and enter this amount on another totalizer during a single operation of the machine.

With these and incidental objects in View, the invention includes certain novel features of construction and combinations of parts, the essential elements of which are set forth in appended claims, and a preferred form or embodiment of which is hereinafter described with reference to the drawings which accompany and form a part of this $D ificati0n.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic view of .the keyboard of the machine embodying the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a facsimile of a fragmentary portion of the multi-column record material used in the present machine, showing the item composing each transaction printed in various ones of the different columns according to the different classifications of the item and the sub-total or total of each transaction printed in a certain one of said columns.

Fig. 3 is a facsimile of another fragmentary portion of the record material, showing a recapitulation of the cash items previously printed in each of the diil'erent columns, and the total of the cash items in each column or different classification printed in a certain one of said columns.

Fig. 4 is a facsimile of still another fragmentary portion of the record material, illustrating the use of the machine as an adding machine for Ohtaining and printing the grand total of the various items.

Fig. 5 is a cross-sectional view of the machine taken just to the right of the ten-cent amount keybank, showing said amount keybank, the differential mechanism associated therewith, and also showing the indicators, the printing mechanism and the totalizer mechanism actuated by said dilierential mechanism.

Fig. 6 is a detail side view of the bank of transaction keys and the differential mechanism associated therewith.

Fig. '7 is a detail side view of the list key in the bank of transaction keys, showing the various detents associated therewith and in particular the special detent for holding said key depressed until the total of a transaction is printed.

Fig. 8 is a detail side elevation of the bank of coulmn selection keys and the differential mechanism associated therewith.

Fig. 9 is a right side elevation of the slide for controlling the different functions of the machine, and the mechanism associated therewith.

Fig. 10 is a detail side elevation of a portion of the totalizer shifting and engaging mechanisms shown in Figs. 14 and 18.

Fig. 11 is a detail side view of a portion of the totalizer framework and a totalizer wheel aliner engaging and disengaging mechanism.

Fig. 12 is a detail side view of a portion of the mechanism for engaging the totalizer wheels with the amount actuators.

Fig. 13 is a detail view of the aliner for the totalizer wheels.

Fig. 14 is a right side elevation of the mechanism for selectively controlling the engaging and disengaging movement of the totalizers, and the mechanism for imparting the engaging and disengaging movement to said totalizers.

Fig. 15 shows a portion of the linkage operated by the transaction difierential by which the indicator and control segments are positioned under control of the transaction keys.

Fig. 16 is a detail view of the cam and lever mechanism for rendering the controlling means efiect'ive to control the selection of the totalizers and to control the engaging and disengaging movement of the totalizers with and from the amount actuators.

Fig. 17 is a detail view of the mechanism for disengaging .the zero stop pawls in reading and resetting operations.

Fig. 18 is a right side elevation of the totalizer shifting mechanism.

Fig. 19 is a view of a portion of the mechanism shown in Fig. 18, looking in the direction of the arrows with certain parts added to show the relation of the shifting mechanism and the engaging mechanism.

Fig. 20 is a detail side elevation of a portion of the totalizer shifting mechanism.

Fig. 21 is a detail side view of a portion of the selecting means for controlling the shifting of the totalizers.

Fig. 22 is a further view of the totalizer selecting mechanism shown in Fig. 18, looking in the direction of the arrows.

Fig. 23 is a front elevation of the list key release mechanism.

Fig. 24 is a detail side view of a portion of the list key release mechanism shown in Fig. 23.

Fig. 25 is a detail side elevation of certain control means to be used when charge items are to be entered into the group totalizer.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION The machine disclosed in the aforesaid Carey et a1. application is provided with a single totalizer which is used when the machine is operated both as a cash register and as an adding machine. When such machine is used as a cash register, a total or sub-total operation can be performed only after a control slide has been manually adjusted to properly condition the machine for performing such operations. n the other hand, when the control slide has been adjusted to condition the machine for use as an adding machine, a subtotal or total operation may be performed by the simple depression of certain control keys provided for that purpose. When the machine of the Carey et al. application is used as a cash register, it is not practical to obtain a total of the items comprised in each multiple item transaction registered, due to the manual adjustment which must be given to the control slide in order to accomplish such results. The machine is therefore more suitably adapted, when used as a cash register, to accumulate all of the items comprising the various transactions registered in the machine, thus maintaining a running total of all the items entered into the machine. However, if it is desired to change the operation of the machine from that of a cash register to that of an adding machine, it is first necessary to reset the totalizer to zero to clear the running total therefrom before the machine can be used as an adding machine.

The present machine is provided with two totalizers, namely, an item totalizer and a group totalizer, with novel selecting means for controlling the shifting of the different totalizers preparatory to engaging them with the amount actuators, and with novel means for controlling the engagement and disengagement of the totalizers and the actuators. The present arrangement provides a plurality of depressible control keys, certain of which control the operation of the item totalizer when the machine is used as a cash register, so that the various items comprised in each transaction may be entered thereon, a sub-total printed therefrom, the amount of taxes or other amounts then added thereon, and the total cleared therefrom printed on the record material, and transferred to the group totalizer. If the transaction to be entered into the machine involves only a single item, then the group totalizer will be selected by other of said control keys to receive said item. Before the machine can be used as an adding machine, it is necessary to operate the machine under control of one of the control keys in order to remove any amount standing on the item totalizer, which amount is automatically transferred to the group totalizer to insure that a running total of all the items will be retained in the machine. A manually adjustable control slide is provided for conditioning the machine to perform various functions, such as, for example, those of an adding machine, when only the item totalizer is utilized. When the machine is being used as as an adding machine, a sub-total or grand total may be printed of the amount standing on said item totalizer at any time by simply depressing either the subtotal or total control key, just as is done when the machine is being operated as a cash register; however, under these conditions the amount cleared from the item totalizer is not transferred to the group totalizer. It will be evident from the above that when changing the use of the machine from a cash register to an adding machine, the total of the amounts registered therein during its use as a cash register remains on the group totalizer. When it is desired to again use the machine as a cash register it is relatively simple to clear the item totalizer and adjust the control slide to condition the machine for use as a cash register.

The machine of this invention is arranged to be normally operated by electrical means; however, manual means is provided for operating the machine when necessary or desirable.

As presently constructed, the machine embodying this invention has five rows of adding or amount keys, four rows of ledger or number printing keys, one row of transaction keys, and one row of column selection keys.

The functioning of the machine either as a cash register or as an adding machine is controlled by a control slide conveniently located on the lefthand side of the keyboard. The control slide has five positions of adjustment; namely, Register, Lock Register, Read Total, Adding, and Reset Total and is provided with a lock which may be operated by two types of keys, either of which may be used to lock the control slide in either Register position or Lock Register position. One type of key permits the control slide to be moved to the Reset Total position and is known as the Reset key. The other type of key, which is known as the Read key, does not permit the control slide to be moved beyond the Read Total position. When the control slide is in Register position, the machine is conditioned to function as a cash register, and when said control slide is in Adding position the machine is conditioned to function as an adding machine.

In the art, a total recording operation is often referred to as a reset total operation and a sub-total recording operation is often referred to as a read total operation. Therefore the terms total and reset total as used herein refer to an operation in which the totalizer is cleared of the amount standing thereon and the terms subtotal or read total refer to operations in which the amount remains on the totalizer.

When the machine is used as a cash register, the fifth or highest order row of amount keys is locked against depression, and only the four lower order rows of amount keys may be used for registering amounts, thus providing a maximum registering capacity of $99.99. When the machine is used as an adding machine, the fifth row of amount keys is unlocked," thus giving the keyboard a capacity of $999.99. This change in keyboard capacity is controlled by the control slide, and when said slide is in any other position except Adding position, the fifth row of amount keys is locked against depression.

The control slide, in addition to controlling the functions of the machine as a cash register or adding machine, also controls the engaging and disengaging of the group totalizer and the item totalizer with and from the actuators, each of which totalizers has a wheel for each of the five denominational orders of the amount banks and a sixth order wheel which is used to receive overflow amounts from the wheel in the highest or fifth denominational order. When the control slide is in Register position, the bank of transaction keys functions in' conjunction therewith to control the selection of the totalizers for engagement with or disengagement from the amount actuators. For example when the machine is conditioned for operation as a cash register, the Cash key and the Received-on-Account key, each controls the selection of the group totalizer. If a multiple-item cash transaction is to be entered into the machine, the List key is utilized to select the item totalizer. When the List key is depressed, means is provided for maintaining it in depressed position until either the Total Cash List or the Total Charge List key is depressed. The Total Cash List key controls the selection, together with the selective engagement and disengagement of both totalizers and the actuators, in such a manner that the amount on the item totalizer will be removed therefrom and transferred to the group totalizer during a single operation of the machine. If it is desired to print and indicate the sub-total of said multiple-item transaction, then the Sub-Total key is depressed, which controls the selection of the item totalizer in order to read the same. Any additional amounts such as the amount of tax involved in said transaction may then be set up on the amount keys and added into the item totalizer. The Total Cash List key is then depressed to clear the total from the item totalizer and transfer the same to the group totalizer, and at the same time this key controls means for printing this total on the record material.

The Paid-0ut and No-Sale keys do not effect selection of any of the totalizers and merely serve to control the adjustment of means for indicating and printing the amounts, together with identifying symbols.

In the case of a charge transaction, the Charge key is depressed to enter a single-item transaction, and said key merely controls means for indicating and printing the amounts, without selecting any totalizers. On the other hand, if a multiple-item charge transaction is to be entered into the machine, the List key is depressed and the various items constituting such transaction are entered into the machine. The List key will control the selection of the item totalizer for adding such items thereon. The Total Charge List key is then depressed to cause the total to be cleared from the item totalizer without transferring such amount to the group totalizer and to control means for indicating and printing said total charge amount, together with an identifying symbol.

If it is desired to have the machine accumulate charge items on the group totalizer in the same manner as is done with respect to cash items. a single member may be provided which can be easily placed in the machine to enable the machine to accomplish this result.

When the control slide is in Look Register position, all of the keys on the keyboard are locked against depression and the machine is locked against release for ope When the control slide is in Read Total position, operation of the machine causes the up totalizer to be read automatically.

If the control slide is in the Adding position, the machine functions as an adding machine, and in this case the item totalizer is engaged with and disengaged from the actuators. The fifth or highest order row of adding or amount keys is released for depression. When it is desired to read or take a sub-total from the item totalizer, the Sub-Total key is depressed. The Total Cash List key is depressed to clear the total amount from the item totalizer, but in this case such amount is not transferred to the group totalizer as is done when the machine is operated as a cash register, as previously described.

When the control slide is moved to the Reset Total position, operation of the machine causes the group totalizer to be cleared and the amount removed therefrom, such amount being set up on the indicators and printed on the record material.

It will be seen from the above that the control exercised by the Total Cash List key over the engagement and disengagement of the item and group totalizers varies according to the position of the control slide.

The differential mechanisms for the five rows of adding or amount keys, in addition to controlling the positioning the corresponding totalizer wheels, also control the positioning of corresponding type wheels for printing records upon record material. Also, the differential mechanisms for the four lower order rows of amount keys control the positioning of corresponding indicator wheels, which are visible through apertures in the front and back of the upper portion of the machine cabinet, for indicating amounts when the machine is used as a cash register. The type wheels for the four lower order rows of amount keys are mounted in a framework which is shiftable laterally from normal printing position to any one of eight columnar printing positions for the classifying of items when the machine is used as a cash register. The columnar positioning of the framework for the four lower order amount type wheels is controlled by the row of column selecting keys, which row is located on the righthand side of the keyboard. The transaction keys control the positioning of corresponding indicators and corresponding type wheels for indicating and recording the type of transaction being performed.

The record material, a fragmentary portion of which is shown in Fig. 2, is comparatively wide, and is divided into nine vertical columns, the extreme lefthand column being considerably wider than the other eight columns, and is used for the printing of the ledger numbers and all other identifying data, amounts. and is also used for the autographic entering of additional information opposite the printed entries. When the machine is used as a cash register, all subtotals and totals are printed in this wide lefthand column, and when the machine is used as an adding machine, all amounts, sub-totals and totals are printed in this lefthand column.

When the machine is used as a cash register,

no-sale items are invariably printed in the lefthand column, but cash and charge items cannot be printed in the lefthand column, and therefore must be printed in one of the other eight columnar positions, located to the right thereof. When the machine is used as a cash register, received-on-account and paid-out item may be printed in the lefthand column, or in any desired one of the other eight columns of the record materlal.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Machine framework The mechanism of the machine is supported by two main frames 60 and 6| (Figs. 5, 6, 8,and 22) secured to a machine base 62. The indicator mechanism and a part of the printer positioning mechanism are supported by auxiliary frames 63 and 64 (Figs. 5, 14, 18 and 22) secured, respec- .tively, to the main frames 69 and 6|. The machine base 62 i supported by a drawer cabinet (not shown here but illustrated in the above Carey et a1. application) which encloses a cash drawer. The mechanism of the machine is enclosed in a suitable cabinet 65.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 9, a control slide 1'2 is slidably mounted on the left main frame 60 in a manner to be described later, and said control slide 12 supports a lock having a rotary locking bolt 13 with a locking lug thereon adapted to engage notche in a locking plate, when said bolt is rotated by a key which may be inserted into said lock. The locking plate just referred to is not shown herein, but is illustrated and described in Fig. 29 of the above mentioned Carey et a1. application. The notches in the locking plate are so arranged as to correspond to the Register position and the Lock Register position of the slide 12, so that aid slide may be locked in either of these positions by the possessor of the key to the lock in said slide.

Operating mechanism Under normal conditions, a conventional type of electric motor drives a main shaft 19 one clockwise revolution during each machine operation. However, a hand crank, such as that shown in the above mentioned Carey et al. application, is provided for driving said main shaft when necessary or desirable.

Keyboard Referring to Fig. 1, the keyboard of the present machine comprises four rows of amount keys 80, giving a maximum registering capacity of $99.99; an additional row of amount keys 8|, used in conjunction with the amount keys 80 to increase the keyboard capacity to $999.99 when the machine is used as an adding machine; four rows of number printing control keys 8!, for controlling the printing of identifying numbers; and one row of transaction keys 83 for controlling the positioning of the corresponding printing wheels to record the type of transaction being performed and also for controlling the engagement and disengagement of the totalizer with and from the actuators and also for controlling the shifting of the totalizers to effect the proper selection thereof. The keyboard also comprises a row of column selecting keys 84 for selectively controlling the shifting of the four amount type wheels corresponding to the four rows of amount keys 80, to cause various items to be printed in corresponding columns of the record material; a space key 85 for manually linen e an) spacing the record material; and a drawer release key 86 for manually releasing the cash drawer. A motor bar 81 is provided for initiating machine operation; while the control slide I2 is used to control the functions of the machine.

The keys to 86 inclusive, are not assembled in individual banks, as is the usual custom, but instead, all of said keys are assembled in a single unit keyboard framework comprising front and back frame 88 and 89, one at each end of the framework (Figs. 5, 6 and 8), a partition plate 90 for each row of keys, an upper support plate 9|, and a lower support plate 92. All of the above plates are secured together by means of tenon and slot connections, not shown herein. Small rods 93 pass through holes in the partition plates 90 and slots in the keys 88 to retain the latter in the machine. The keyboard assembly is retained in place in the machine by means of four screws 94, only one of which is shown herein, which pass through clearance holes in bent-over ears on the front and back frames 88 and 89, and are threaded into holes in the main frames 60 and 6|. All that is necessary to remove the entire keyboard assembly from the machine is to remove the four screws 94.

A keyboard top plate (Figs. 1, 5, 6 and 8) is provided for covering the keyboard framework and for giving a finished appearance to the keyboard assembly. The keyboard top plate 95 has provided therein clearance openings for clearing the tips of all of the keys of the keyboard and, in addition, has openings for the control slide 12 and the motor bar 81.

Amount keys Inasmuch as the mechanism associated with the keys is substantially duplicated for each row of amount keys, it is believed that a description of the ten-cent denominational amount keys, shown in Fig. 5, will sufiice for all.

The keys 80 (Figs. 1 and 5) for the ten-cent amount bank are depressibly supported in slots in the plates 9| and 92 and are retained against removal by means of slots therein, through which slots extend corresponding ones of the tie rods 93. Each of the amount keys 89 is normally retained in undepressed position by coil spring IBI, which extends horizontally through the entire keyboard assembly, there being one such spring for all keys of like numerical value, each spring being engageable by notches in the keys of like value in all the different banks of keys. The springs |ll| rest on the top surface of the upper support plate 9|; when a key is depressed, said spring is ten sioned by being forced downwardly through an opening in said plate, adjacent the key stem; and, when said key is released, the spring ||l| returns it upwardly to its undepressed position, as here shown.

This type of keyboard spring construction is fully disclosed in the above mentioned Carey et a1. application and is similar to the construction shown in United States Patent No. 2,210,099, issued August 6, 1940, to B. M. Shipley, to which reference may be had for a more detailed description of the keyboard spring construction.

Each of the rows of amount keys has a detent I92 (Fig. 5) for locking the keys in depressed position, and a control plate I93 for releasing .the zero stop pawls so that the differential mechanism may be moved away from zero position and be arrested by the depressed amount keys. The detent IBZ and control plate I03 are substantially 75 like and operate in the same manner as the detent 206 and plate 201 illustrated in Fig. 31 of the before mentioned Carey et a1. application. The deten-t and control plate and their operation are fully described in the Carey et al. application and reference may be had thereto for a full understanding thereof. The amount keybanks are of flexible construction, wherein the depression of a key in the keybank releases a previously depressed key in the same keybank.

Amount 'diflerential mechanism Since the construction and operation of the differential mechanism associated with each bank of amount keys is substantiallyithe same @as that illustrated anddescribedin the above mentioned Careyret alapplication, it is felt that a very .brief descriptionthereoi will sufiice herein.

Each bank'of amount keys '80 or BI has assodated-therewithone of .a plurality of differential slides I04 (Fig. 5) shiftably supported in a framework comprising front and back members 405 and i'flfirfififllld, respectively, to ,-inve1 ted-U-shaped bars ';:I'01 and lflil, in turn secured to partition plates 1-09 {or each order (only one here shown) saidplatedn tum being vmounted'on rods H and Hi :snpperted bythe -main frames 60 and. BI. Each difierential slide M'has formed thereon four. upward projections having ears I I2 bent towardcthe lei -t, SQldBBJSEbBiHg adapted to cooperate-with the odd numbered keys 1, 3, 5 and 7, and :saidslide likewise has fcursirnilar projectionschaving ears H3 thereon bent toward the right :and arrarnged 'to cooperate with the even numbered keys 2, 4, 6 and 8. The stems of the amount key-s inneach bank are arranged in staggeredxformaticn. so that the stems of the odd .numbered keys are arranged toward the left while the stems of the even .numberedkeys are to the rights:

' Depression of anyone of the. a-mount'keys excent the 9= key moves thestem thereof into the pa'tl'isof the corresponding ear H2 or I I3 and simultaneously 'movesthe zero stop mawl'out of the .path.-'of-another: car (not shown herein) on'said I13 to'engage the lower end of the stem of the I depressed amount-key to arrest the slide I04 and the corresponding 'Jdifierential mechanism after diiferen-tial movement corresponding to the value of:the-depressed amount key. When the 9 key "inrany amountubank is. depressed,'the slide I04 travels. the full. distance rearwardly to the position; which determined by a projection II4 thereoncoming into contact with a 7 square stud H5 in the lefthand partition plate I09 for that particular denomination.

The slide I04 (Fig. 5) is connected to and controls thezextent of movement of a correspondin differential mechanism rtodifferent positions in accordance with the control-exerted by the keys during-the rearward movement of the slide. In adding operations the corresponding wheel of the selected totalizeris engaged withisaid differential mechanism after the difierentialmechanism has beendifierentially positioned, and return movement of the differential mechanism to its home position adjusts said totalizer wheel in accordance with the value of the depressedzamount key.

The amountdilferential mechanism which is shown 'in Fig. '5, includes a difi'erentially movable actuator I23,-free ona rod H4, and having a stud I22 engaging a slot in an arm I2I secured to the differential slide I04, whereby the actuator can drive the slide I04 in unison therewith and the slide can control the extent of movement of the actuator I23.

During each cycle of operation of the machine, the actuator I23 is driven first in a clockwise direction and then in a counter-clockwise direction by a driving segment I34, also loosely mounted on rod I 24, which driving segment is given its clockwise and counter-clockwise movement during each operation of the machine, by means hereinafter to be described.

The actuator I23 is connected to the driving segment I34 by means of a latch I21 pivotally mounted on stud I28 on a latch plate I29 also loose on rod I24. A stud I26 on the latch I21 works in an inclined slot I25 formed in the actuator I23 and also in a slot I30 formed in a latch control plate I3I, and provides the means whereby these parts are connected for joint movement. A spring I32 urges the actuator I2'3cl0ckwise and the latch control plate I3I counterclockwise, creating ascissors action between the slots I25 and I30 and the stud I26 to retain the latch I21 normally in clockwise position as shown in Fig. 5, in which position the latch engages a shoulder I33 on the driving segment I34. As long as the latch I21 remains engaged with the shoulder I33, the driving segment I34, during its clockwise movement, can move the actuator 123, the latch control plate I3I and the differential slide I04.

As explained earlier herein, the differential slide I04 may be arrested undercontrol of the amount keys after difierent extents of movement have been imparted to the slide. When the slide I04 is thus arrested, it is effective, through the arm I2I and's'tud I22, to arrest further movement of the actuator I23. However, at this time the latch {21 will continue to move, and this further movement will enable the stud I26 on the latch I21 to coact 'with the slot I25 in the actuator I23 to cam the latch I21 out of engagement with the shoulder I33 On'the driving segment I34 and release the actuator I23 fromits driving means. In this manner, the differential slide I04 is effective to'control the differential movement of the actuator I23 according to the amount set up on the amount keys.

During the counter-clockwise movement of the driving segment I34, a stud I13 thereon engages an extension on the latch plate I29, which eX- tension is not shown in Fig. 5, but is similar to the extension 252 shown in Fig. 6, and drives the latch plate I29, the latch I21, and, through the stud I26, drives the differential actuator I23, the latch control plate I3I, and the differential slide I04 back to normal or starting position.

The means for imparting the above mentioned clockwise and counter-clockwise movements to the driving segment I34 during each operation of the machine will now be described.

As previously explained, the main shaft 19 makes one complete clockwise revolution during a machine operation. The driving segment I34 has therein a slot I4I (Fig. 5) which engages a stud (not shown herein but corresponding to the stud 245 in Fig. 8 of the above mentioned Carey et al. application) in a differential drive arm I42 free on a rod I43 supported by the frames and SI. An eccentric I44 adjustably connects the arm I42 to a companion arm I45, also free on the rod I43, and said arm I45, and similar arms for the other dilierential mechanism are connected together by a rod I46 which is carried by a differential cam lever I41 also free on the rod I43. The cam lever I41 carries rollers I48 and I49 which cooperate, respectively, with the peripheries of companion plate cams I50 and II secured to the main shaft 19. The lever I41 is located on the lefthand end of the rod I43 and supports the lefthand end of the rod I46, while a similar cam lever (not shown) is located near the righthand end of said rod I43 and supports the righthand end of said rod I48, and carries rollers which cooperate with a pair of companion plate cams, not shown but like the cams I50 and I5I, also secured to the main drive shaft I9. The rod I46, therefore, forms an operating connection between the cam levers, as I41, and the arms I45 for the amount differential mechanism and the differential mechanism associated with the number printing control keys 82.

As previously explained, the main shaft 19 (Fig. 5) makes one clockwise revolution during a machine operation. When the machine is in home position, the slide I04 and the actuator I23 have been moved one position beyond zero, as here shown, for the purpose of enabling transfers to be effected, as fully explained in the above mentioned Carey et a1. application. At the beginning of a machine operation, the cams I 50 and I5 I, as well as the other pair of cams (not shown) corresponding thereto, through the connections here shown, rock the arm I42 and driving segment I34 a short distance clockwise to move the actuator I23 and slide I04 to zero position where ;they remain during a period in which the restoration of any tripped transfer mechanism takes place in a manner fully explained in the Carey et al. application. After the transfer mechanism has been restored, the cams I50 and I5I impart further clockwise motion to the driving segment I34 which tends to drive the actuator I23 and differential slide I04 further. If noamount key in the bank has been depressed, further movement of the slide and the actuator will be prevented by the zero stop pawl, but if an amount key has been depressed, the slide I04 and the actuator can continue their movement until one of the bent-over ears H2 or II3 on the slide I04 comes into contact with the lower end of the stem of the depressed amount key. This obstructs further movement rearwardly of the slide I04 and the actuator I23 in accordance with the value of the depressed amount key. Stopping the actuator I23 causes the stud I26 to ride up the inclined surface of the slot I25, against the action of the slot I30 and the spring I32, to disengage the latch I21 from the shoulder I33 of the driving segment I34 in a position corresponding to the amount key 80 which has been depressed.

After the latch I21 has been disengaged from the driving segment I34, the segment I34 is free to complete its clockwise movement.

Since the operation of the transfer mechanism to effect a transfer and the manner in which it is restored form no part of the present invention and are fully illustrated and described in the before mentioned Carey et al. application, refer ence may be had to that application for a full understanding thereof.

One end of a beam I51 (Fig. 5) is pivotally connected to the latch plate I29, and, when the arm I42 nears the terminus of its initial clockwise movement, a roller I58, carried thereby, engages an arcuate surface on the forward edge of said beam and forces a curved surface on the inside edge thereof into engagement with the periphery of a hub I59, free on the rod I24, to position said beam I51 in accordance with the value of the depressed amount key 80. The differential positioning of the :beam I5! is transmitted through a link I50 to the indicator mechanism and the printing mechanism by means fully illustrated and described in the above mentioned Carey et al. application, and reference is hereby made thereto for a full understanding thereof.

After the differential actuator I23 (Fig. 5) has been positioned under the influence of the depressed key during amount entering operations, either one of two totalizer wheels I10 and Ill, (Figs. 5, 19 and 22) for this particular denomination, depending upon which one of two totalizers is selected, is engaged with a plurality of gear teeth I12 in said actuator I23. Return movement counter-clockwise of the differential drive arm I 42 under the influence of the cams I50 and I'5I, turns the driving segment I34 in a counter-clockwise direction, causing the stud I13 thereon to engage the extension of the latch plate- I29, not shown but similar to extension 252 shown in Fig. 6, at the same time that the shoulder I33 or undercut portion of the periphery of the segment I34 is moved past the latch portion of the latch I21. When the undercut portion of the periphery of the segment I34 moves opposite the latch I21, the camming action of the angular slots I25 and I30 in the actuator I23 and the plate 13 I, under the influence of the spring I32, immediately reengages said latch with the shoulder I33 on the segment I34. The latch plate I29 and the latch I21 are now free to return counterclockwise in unison with the segment I34 and, through the stud I26, carry the latch control plate I3I and the actuator I23 counter-clockwise in unison therewith from set position to home position. The return counter-clockwise movement of the actuator I 23 causes the teeth I12 to rotate the totalizer wheel engaged therewith for this particular denomination in a clockwise direction, in accordance with the value of the depressed amount key 80, to add in said wheel said value. After the actuator I23 has been returned to home position, the totalizer wheel is disengaged therefrom.

In total and sub-total recording operations the selected totalizer wheel I10 or I1I is engaged with the teeth I12 before the actuator I23 moves clock- I wise from its home position. The clockwise movement of the actuator I23 rotates the engaged wheel counter-clockwise to its zero position where the wheel will be effective to prevent further movement of the actuator in a Well known manner fully explained in the above mentioned Carey et al. application. After the actuator has completed its clockwise movement, the totalizer wheel is disengaged therefrom.

In sub-total recording operations, the totalizer wheel is reengaged with the actuator before it begins its return movement counter-clockwise and enables the amount removed from the wheel to be restored. After the actuator has been restored to its home position the totalizer wheel is disengaged therefrom.

The mechanism for engaging and disengaging the wheel with and from the actuator in these different kinds of operations will be described more fully hereinafter.

Transaction keys The transaction keys 83 (Figs. 1, 6 and 7) are depressibly supported in the keyboard framework i th same manner as the amount keys previously described. The transaction key bank contains the following keys (Fig. 1) Total Charge List, Total Cash List, Sub Total, List, No Sale, Paid Out, Received on Account, Charge and Cash, which keys have been numbered respectively from 1 through 9 according to their position in the bank, in order that the controls exerted by the different keys may be more readily explained.

Depression of any one of the transaction keys 83 causes a projection 231 on the forward or left side of the key stem to cooperate in the forward edge of a corresponding slot in a locking detent 225 to shift the detent forwardly, or toward the left, as here viewed, against the action of a spring (not shown) until the projection passes beneath the detent. When this occurs, the detent 225 is returned by the spring to a position over the projection 231 to lock the key in depressed position. This keybank is of the flexible type and any key, except the List key, may be released by the depression of another key in the bank.

The machine is provided with the usual keylock shaft 286 which is released for clockwise movement to initiate an operation of the machine, and is given a counter-clockwise movement near the end of each machine operation. As is well known, and is shown fully in the above mentioned Carey et a1. application, a series of key releasing members are loosely mounted on the keylock shaft and are operated counter-clockwise by a bail 2311 of a yoke loose on shaft 286 but driven by the shaft near the end of each machine operation to shift the locking detents for the various keybanks to the left to release any depressed keys. One of these releasing members, shown at 229 in Figs. 6, 23 and 24, is provided to shift the detent 225 forwardly or to the left to release any depressed key in this bank except the List key.

A further locking detent 226, Figs. 6 and '7, has

an extension 312 on its right end carrying a stud 311 which engages a notch in a member 353 loose on keylock shaft 286, and is urged toward the left by a spring 354 which engages the member 353. This detent 226 has slots arranged therein so that it is only operated by the List key. A projection 232 on the rear or right hand side of the key stem of the List key cooperates with the associated slot in detent 226 to shift the detent rearwardly against the action of the spring 354, and when the key has been depressed the detent will return forwardly to engage over the projection 232 and retain the List key in depressed position until the detent 2215 is shifted under control of the Total Cash List key or Total Charge List key in a manner to be described. The detent 226 therefore serves to retain the List key in depressed position throughout the entry of the several items which make up a multiple-item transaction even though the locking detent 225 will be operated near the end of each item-entering operation.

As fully explained in the above mentioned Carey et al. application, the various total and sub-total keys and the No Sale key operate a control plate 233 to lock the amount keys against depression and all keys except the Charge and Cash keys are effective, through extensions 234 of a control plate 235 in the bank of column selecting keys 84, to withdraw the hook 236 (Fig. 8), from a member 231 secured to the keylock shaft 286. The instant machine is provided with a further hook 221 (Fig. 6), which cooperates with another member 228 secured to the keylock shaft 286. A control plate 259 in the transaction keybank is shifted to the left by the depression of any transaction key and is effective to remove this hook 221 and also re- 14 move the zero stop pawl 251 from the differential slide for this bank.

The control over the removal of the hooks 221 and 236 is such that the depression of an key in the transaction bank except the Charge and Cash key will remove both hooks to allow the keylock line to be released by the Motor Bar, but when the Charge and Cash keys are depressed, they will only be effective to remove hook 221, and will require the depression of a key 84 in the column selecting bank to remove hook 236 so that the keylock line can be released by the Motor Bar.

As stated earlier herein, detent 225 is shifted forwardly near the end of each machine operation and will release any key, except the List key, which may have been depressed. Even though detent 225 is operated, the List key will be retained in its depressed position by the locking detent 226 until the detent 226 is shifted rearwardly or toward the right. The mechanism for shifting the detent 226 to the right will now be described.

As shown in Figs. 5, 6, '7, 23 and 24, the releasing members 215 and 216 for the ten-cent and units denominational orders are loosely mounted on the keylock shaft 285 and are connected together by a sleeve. These releasing members 215 and 216 have extensions on their lower ends, in which extensions are slots as 329, one of which is shown clearly in Fig. 5, and these slots have a lower narrow portion and an upper wider portion. Also mounted on the keylock shaft 286 is a lever 321 which has a slot 336 in its lower end. A rod 328 extends through the slots in the extensions of the release members 215 and 216 and also through the slot 33!] in the lever 321. If the rod 328 is in the lower or narrow portions of the slots 329 in the release members 215 and 216, it will be driven thereby when they are rocked counterclockwise and will impart this movement to the lever 321. On the other hand, if the rod 328 is in the upper or wider portions of the slots in the release members 215 and 216 the rod 328 will not be driven thereby and the lever 321 will not be rocked.

When lever 321 is rocked counter-clockwise, an upward extension thereof will contact a stud 339 in an arm 348, loose on a shaft 351 supported by the main frames 60 and 61, and will rock the arm counter-clockwise. arm 34!) is connected by a sleeve to another arm 341, which is also loose on shaft 351. A stud 342 carried by arm 341 engages a slot 352 in the member 353 loose on the keylock shaft and when the lever 321 rocks the arms 346 and 341 counter-clockwise, arm 341 will rock the member 353 clockwise and, through the stud 311, will shift the locking detent 226 to the right at the same time the locking detent 225 is shifted to release the List key.

The rod 328 is carried by links 325 which are pivoted on arms 324 fast to a shaft 331, journalled in a pair of totalizer supporting plates 184 (Figs. 12 and 22) which are fastened to the main frames 60 and 61. Shaft 331 normally occupies a position as shown in Fig. 24 in which the rod 328 is located in the lower or narrow portions of the slots 329 in the extensions of the arms 215 and 216. However, in any operation in which the List key is depressed, shaft 331 will be rocked counterclockwise by means later to be described, and when so rocked will carry the rod 328 into the upper or wide portions of the slots to prevent the operation of the lever 32'! and the shifting of the locking detent 226. Shaft 331 will remain in its shifted position until an operation in which either the Total Cash List or Total Charge List 15 key has been depressed, and during this operation the shaft 33I will be rocked clockwise to return the rod 328 to the lower portion of the slots to enable the locking detent 226 to be shifted to release the List key.

A control detent 292 is shiftable forwardly by the control slide I2 in a manner to be described, and is effective to lock all the transaction keys except the Total Charge List, the Total Cash List and Sub-Total keys against depression when the control slide is in any position except Register position.

Each of the transactions keys 83, when in depressed position, is effective to control the differential positioning of the related transaction differential mechanism.

Transaction difierential mechanism The differential mechanism which is controlled by the transaction keys 83 is shown in Fig. 6. This mechanism is similar to and operates in exactly the same manner as the differential mechanism for the amount bank shown in Fig. and explained earlier herein, with the exception that the tens transfer mechanism and actuating teeth are omitted from the dfferential segment in the transaction differential, which segment corresponds to the actuator in the amount differential mechanism. A latch 246 carried by a latch plate 245 engages a shoulder on a driving segment 244 and enables the latch plate 245 to be driven thereby. A stud 241 in the latch 246 extends through angular slots in a differential balance plate 248 and a differential segment 249 to operatively connect these parts to the latch plate 245. The differential segment 249 carries a stud engaged by the bifurcated lower end of a plate 250 (shown broken away herein) secured to the transaction differential slide 25I slidably mounted in the differential slide framework in exactly the same manner as the differential slide I04 (Fig. 5) for the ten-cent amount bank previously described.

The transaction differential slide 25I is normally retained in zero position by the zero stop pawl 25'! free on a shaft 258 journaled in the frames 60 and 6|. However, as explained earlier herein, depression of any one of the transaction keys 83 (Fig. 6) shifts the control plate 259 forwardly to rock the zero stop pawl 25! to ineffective position. At the same time, the lower end of the stem of the depressed key is moved in the path of the corresponding one of a series of bentover ears on the slide 25I. The differential driving segment 244 is connected to an arm 260 free on the rod I43, said arm being connected by an adjustable eccentric to a cam lever 26I also free on the rod I43. The cam lever 26I carries rollers 262 and 263 which cooperate, respectively, with the peripheries of companion plate cams 264 and 265 secured to the shaft I9.

Clockwise rotation of the shaft 19 (Fig. 6) causes the cams 264 and 265 to rock the lever 26I and the arm 260, first in a clockwise direction, to rock the transaction differential mechanism clockwise to shift the slide 25I rearwardly until.

such rearward movement is interrupted by the depressed transaction key 83. This releases the latch 246 from the driving segment 244 and positions the slide 25I and the differential segment 249, the balance plate 248 and the latch plate 245 in accordance with the depressed transaction key 83. As the arm 260 nears the terminus of its movement clockwise, it causes a roller 266, carried thereby, to engage an arcuate surface on a beam 243 which is pivoted on the latch plate 245. The roller 266 forces said beam into contact with a bushing on the rod I24 to position said beam in accordance with the depressed transaction key 83. A link 242 connects the beam 243 to a bell crank 248 (Fig. 15) which is free on shaft 24I and which is connected by link 239 to an arm 238 fastened to shaft 22I and enables the differential move ment of the beam 243 to be utilized to position shaft 22 I.

Shaft 22I has a control segment 2I9 (Figs. 14 and 21) fastened thereon for differential movement therewith under control of the transaction keys. A second control segment 220 is pivoted on a stud 222 on an extension 223 of the auxiliary frame 64 and is connected by a link 224 to the segment 2I9 so that when segment 2I9 is differentially moved in either direction by the shaft 22I, the control segment 220 will be given a like extent of movement in the same direction. Control segment 2I9 has certain means thereon for controlling a totalizer selecting mechanism and other means which are effective with the control segment 220 to control a totalizer engaging means. The control surfaces of the segments 2 I9 and 220 have been given numbers corresponding to those given to the transaction keys to show which portions thereof will be moved to controllin position when the corresponding transaction key has been depressed. Fastened to the control segment 228 by stud 364 is a control segment 363 (Fig. 18) which is positioned in the same manner as the control segment 220 and is effective to control the totalizer selecting mechanism. The manper in which the segments exert their control on the totalizer engaging and selecting mechanisms will be explained more fully hereinafter.

The positionin of the shaft 22I, under the influence of the transaction keys 83, is transmitted, by means shown and described in the aforesaid Carey et al. application, to the indicating mechanism, to impart to the latter the proper adjustment for indicating the type of transaction being registered. For a full understanding of this mechanism, reference is hereby made to said Carey et al. application.

Control slide As previously mentioned, the manually adjustable control slide 12 (Fig. 1) is provided for conditioning the machine to perform different functions. For example, when the slide I2 is moved to its Register position (Fig. 9), the machine is thereby conditioned to function as a cash register. The cash register, in this instance, involves the use of both the item totalizer and the group totalizer. The item totalizer serves to accumulate the items of a multiple item transaction before transferring the total thereof to the group totalizer. The transaction Total Cash List key 83 controls means for resettin the item totalizer to zero and transferring the amount removed therefrom to the group totalizer during one operation of the machine. To read or obtain a sub-total of the items accumulated on the item totalizer, the transaction Sub-Total key 83 is depressed.

Single-item transactions however' are entered directly onto the group totalizer which accumulates a running total of the various cash transactions entered into the machine.

The slide I2 is adjustable to either its Read Total position or its Reset Total position to control the reading or resetting of the group tovtalizer.

When the control slide 12 is moved to its Locked Register position, it locks the machine against operation.

When it is desired to use the machine as an adding machine, the control slide 12 is moved to its Adding position. When the machine is thus conditioned to function as an adding machine, the item totalizer is made available for use. With the control slide 12 in Addin position, the fifth order amount keys 8| are released for operation to increase the keyboard capacity of the machine. The Total Cash List key 83, in this instance, is adapted to control the resetting of the item totalizer to zero without effecting a transfer of the amount taken therefrom to the group totalizer, as is done when the machine is being used as a cash register. The Sub-Total key 83 is employed to read or obtain a sub-total of the amounts entered on the item totalizer.

When the machine is used as a cash register the various items of multiple-item charge transactions can be accumulated in the item totalizer in the same manner as a multiple-item cash transaction. However. these Charge items are not accumulated on the group totalizer which normally serves to record only cash items. The Total Charge List key 83 is depressed when it is desired to obtain the total of said multiple item charge transaction from the item totalizer, and this key causes the resetting of the item totalizer without such amount being transferred to the group totalizer. A single-item charge transaction is not accumulated on the item totalizer, but is merely printed and indicated.

A simple device is provided which may be quick- I ly and easily installed in the machine for adapting it to handle charge items in the same manner as it does cash items, which means will be fully described hereinafter.

The control slide 12 (Fig. 9) is shiftably mounted by means of parallel slots therein cooperating with studs 21'! and 218 secured in the left frame 60. The slide 12 has therein a series of notches 219 corresponding to the various positions of adjustment of said slide, which notches cooperate with a stud 280 in a spring-pulled arm 28l, free on a stud 282 secured in a frame 60, to locate said slide in its various positions of adjustment. As the stud 280 rides from one notch 219 to another, the arm 28! is rocked counter-clockwise, against the tension of a spring, to momentarily raise a projecting finger 283 on said arm into the path of a shoulder 284 on an arm 285, secured on the lefthand end of the keylock shaft 286, journaled in the frames 60 and 6|, to obstruct clockwise releasing movement of said shaft when the control slide I2 is being moved from one position to another, as is fully shown and described in the before mentioned Carey et al. application. When the control slide 12 is moved to "Look Register position, a stud 287 (Fig. 9) carried thereby, moves over a proiecting finger 288 of the arm 285 to lock the keylock shaft 286 against releasing movement, thereby preventing operation of the machine. In a manner similar to that shown in the Carey et al. application, a cam slot 289 in the control slide 12 cooperates with a stud on an arm 290 secured to a shaft 258 journaled in the frames 60 and BI and i effective to rock the shaft 258 to cause an arm 29| thereon (Fig. 6) to shift the control detent 292 forward when the control slide 12 is in all positions except Register position. Control detent 292 is sufiioiently wide at its rear end to engage the control plates 259 and 235 to shift them forwardly to move both hooks 221 and 236 to releasing position so that the machine may be released for operation without requiring the depression of a transaction key 83 or a column selecting key 84. The control slide 12 is also effective, through a cam edge 293 and a locking bail 215 operated thereby to lock the keys against depression when the control slide is in all positions except Register and Adding positions.

A totalizer engaging control segment 294 (Fig. 9) is differentially positioned, under control of the control slide 12, by means to be presently described. The segment 294 is free on the shaft 22I and carries a, stud 295 which projects through a slot 296 in an arm 29'! secured on a shaft 298 journaled in the plates 63 and 64. Also secured on the shaft 298 is an arm 299 having in the upper end thereof a slot which engages a stud 300 in the slide 12.

Moving the control slide 12 from the Register position to any one of its other positions of adjustment causes the arm 299, shaft 298, and arm 291 to rock counter-clockwise, whereupon the control segment 294 will, through the stud 295 and slot 296, be positioned accordingly. The segment 294 has a control portion 2|4 and opposed projections 30l and 302 extending into an opening formed in said segment which projections will, upon certain adjustments of the segment 294, be placed opposite a stud 2I8 (Fig. 14) and cooperate with the latter to control the engagement and disengagement of the selected totalizer with the amount actuators, as will be more fully described hereinafter.

Pivotally mounted on a stud 303 onthe se ment 294 (Figs. 9 and 14) is an auxiliary control member 304 having a slot 309 which is concentric with the stud 333 and in which stud 295 may operate to allow the auxiliary control member to pivot about the stud 303. A spring 30'! connected to a stud 414 in the upper end of the memher 304 and to an extension of the segment 294 normally urges the member 304 clockwise to maintain stud 308 carried thereby in yielding engagement with the edge of the segment 294. The auxiliary control member 304 has a surface 41 2 on the upper end thereof which may be engaged by a stud 4H on the control segment 2l9 to prevent counter-clockwise movement of the auxiliary member 304 about its pivot 303 and thus enables projections 305 and 306 on the auxiliary member 304 to cooperate with the stud H8 in the same manner as projection 30| on segment 294, previously described, to provide additional control over the engaging and disengaging movement of the totalizers.

The segment 294 and the auxiliary control member 304 are moved together as a unit about the shaft 22l by the control slide 12 to bring the projection 305 opposite the stud H8 in Adding operations, and the projection 306 opposite the stud H8 in Register operations.

The form of auxiliary control member 304 shown in Figs. 9 and 14 enables only cash items to be accumulated when the machine. is used as cash register. When it is desired to accumulate charge items as well as cash items, a plate 4l3 (Fig. 25) may be readily slipped over th pivot 303 and over the stud M4 on the upper end of the auxiliary control member 304. The plate 4I3 has two control surfaces M5 and M6 which cooperate with the stud 4 on the segment 2I9 to block the counter-clockwise movement of the auxiliary control member 304 in Charge and Total Charge Item operations of the machine as well as in Cash and Total Cash Item operations.

The control exerted on the totalizer engaging mechanism bv these control segments and members will be fully explained hereinafter.

Also secured to shaft 298 (Fig. 18) are control segment 341 and control member 311, which are differentially positioned under control of the control slide 12. These control elements exercise certain controls over the shifting of the totalizers to select one or the other for engagement with the actuators, as will be later described.

Column selection keys The bank of column selection key 84 (Figs. 1 and 8) are provided herein for the purpose of controlling the shift ng of the printing mechanism to enable printing to take place in different columns on the record material 422 (Figs. 2 and 3). Such columns, in the present instance, have various designations to identify the columns in which items corresponding to different classifications may be printed. The column selection keys 84 may be depressed only when the control slide 12 is in its Register position and when depressed are effective to sh ft the control plate 235 to release the hook 236 from its related member 231 on the keylock shaft. When no column selection key 84 is depressed, a zero stop mechanism causes the differential mechanism to position the shiftable amount type wheels, together with the corresponding transaction type wheels, ledger number wheels, and type wheels corresponding to the control slide 12, to print in a wide column located on the lefthand side of the record material, shown in Figs. 2 and 3, and identified as column I. Inasmuch as the column selection keys 84, together with the mechanism controlled thereby for shifting the printing mechanism to print in the different columns of the record material, is the same as that shown and described in the above mentioned Carey et a1. application,

reference is hereby made to such application for a complete understanding of the same.

Printing mechanism The printing mechanism is fully illustrated and described in the above mentioned Carey et a1. application and therefore it is not thought necessary to show or describe it in detail here. What is shown consists of type wheels 42I (Fig. 5) which are adapted to be shifted laterally under the control of the column selecting keys 84 (Fig. 8) to print in different columns on record material 422 (Figs. 2 and 3).

The method of shifting the totalizer wheels to print in different columns on the record material is fully illustrated and described in the above mentioned Carey et a1. application. Also the method of adjusting the type wheels embodies an application of the well known Kreider principle of driving mechanism disclosed in the above mentioned Kreider Patent No. 1,693,279. Reference is hereby made to said Carey et al. application and Kreider patent for a full showing and description of these methods and mechanisms.

Indicating mechanism The indicating mechanism is fully shown and described in the Carey et a1. application herebefore referred to, and therefore it is not described herein. A segment 423 (Fig. 5) serves to adjust the proper indicator, which segment is set through the link I60 and beam I51, to a position corresponding to the key depressed.

Totalizer mechanism The machine illustrating the invention has two totalizers, namely an item totalizer and a group totalizer. When the machine is used as a cash register the item totalizer is employed to accumulate the total of a plurality of items constituting a multiple item transaction, from which totalizer said amount is transferred to the group totalizer, which, in the present embodiment,maintains a running total of all cash items registered in the machine. When registering a single item cash transaction, the amount is entered directly into the group totalizer. However, when the machine is used as an adding machine, only the item totalizer is used.

The item totalizer includes six totalizer wheels I10 (Figs. 5 and 22), and the group totalizer comprises a like number of totalizer wheels I1 I. Five of the totalizer wheels of each totalizer correspond to the five amount banks, and the sixth order wheel is used to receive overflow amounts from the fifth order. The totalizer wheels I18 and I1! are rotatably mounted on a totalizer shaft I14 (Figs. 5 and 22) which is shiftably supported in a framework to enable the wheels I10 or IN to be moved opposite the actuators to select one or the other of the totalizers for actuation. The framework is shiftable under control of the control slide 12 and the transaction keys 83, to properly engage the selected set of totalizer wheels with and disengage said wheels from their corresponding actuators, which actuators are'similar in every respect to the actuator I23, explained above in connection with the ten-cent bank of amount keys (Fig. 5).

The shiftable totalizer framework comprises left and right plates I15 and I16 (Figs. 11, 12, 19, 20 and 22) which support the totalizer shaft I14, an engaging shaft I11, and a tie rod I18, which secures said plates in fixed relationship to each other. The totalizer shaft I14 is slidably mounted at each end on trunnions I19 and I88 secured in the plates I15 and I18, respectively. The engaging shaft I1l' extends through the end plates I15 and I16, and is rotatably mounted therein. The plates I15 and I16, in turn, are shiftably mounted in the machine by means of slots therein engaging studs I8I and I82 secured in the frames GI] and 6|, respectively, and by means of the ends of the shaft I11, which engage, respectively, slots I83 in a pair of totalizer framework support plates I84, which plates are removably attached to the frames 68 and BI by means of slots in the extensions thereof coacting with studs I85 and by means of screws I85. As shown in Fig. 12, which shows the right-hand plate I84, plates I84 have therein identical camming slots I81, which codperate with rollers I88 carried by arms I89 secured to the shaft I11. When shaft I11 is rotated clockwise by means hereinafter described, the rollers I88 will travel in the slots I81 and will cause the totalizer to be shifted into engagement with the actuator. Roller I88 also engages a. cam slot I90 in arms, as I9l (Fig. 11), to control the movement of the aliner I92. Arms, as the one shown at I93 in Fig. 13, are loosely mounted on tie rod I18 and provide support for the aliner at points intermediate its ends. The construction and operation of the item and group totalizers are similar to the construction and operation of the totalizer shown in Figs. 19 and 22 of the before-mentioned Carey et a1. application, and reference may be had thereto for a more complete showing and description thereof.

Secured to the right-hand end of the shaft I11 (Figs. 12 and 14) is an arm I96 to which is pivoted the upper end of an actuating link I91 by which the shaft I11 may be operated to cause the selected totalizer to be engaged with and disengaged from the amount actuators at proper times in adding, sub-total, and total taking operations. Link I91 may be selectively coupled to its driving means by means which are to be described hereinafter and which are operated under control of the control slide 12 and the transaction differential mechanism.

TOTALIZER ENGAGING MECHANISM The totalizer engaging mechanism of the instant machine enables the selected totalizer to be engaged with and disengaged from the amount actuators at the proper time in the various types of operation which may be performed by the machine.

Secured to the right-hand end of the shaft I11 (Figs. 12 and 14) is the arm I96, to which is pivoted the upper end of the actuating link I91. The actuating link I91 has an inverted T-shaped slot 385 in its lower end, into which slot projects a stud 386 carried by a cam lever 381 free on the stud 208 carried by the main frame BI.

The cam lever 381 carries rollers 388 and 389, which cooperate, respectively, with the peripheries of companion plate cams 390 and 39I secured to the main shaft 19. During each operation of the machine, the cams 390 and 39I cause lever 381 to make two excursions of movement, each of which excursions consists of a counterclockwise movement from the position shown in Fig. 14 and a return to this position. Lever 381 makes its first counter-clockwise movement before the amount actuators I23 are moved clockwise from their home positions and remains in its moved position until these actuators have completed their clockwise movement, after which the lever is returned to its home position. The second counter-clockwise movement of lever 381 occurs before the amount actuators begin their return movement counter-clockwise. Lever 381 will remain in its moved position until these actuators have been returned to normal position, after which lever 381 is returned to its home or normal position.

If the actuating link I91 is in the position shown in Fig. 14, the cam lever 381 will not cause any movement of the actuatin link I91, because the stud 386 will operate idly in the upwardlyextending portion of the slot 385 in the link I91. When the link has been pivoted either clockwise or counter-clockwise to bring the stud 386 into the right-hand or left-hand branch of the slot 385, the counter-clockwise movement of the cam lever 381 will cause an upward movement of the link I91, which, through arm I98, will cause a clockwise movement of the shaft I11 to cause the rollers I88 on arms I89 to cooperate with slots I81 to engage the totalizer with the amount actuators I23. Return movement of the cam lever 381 will cause the actuatin link I91 to be shifted downwardly to its normal position to disengage the totalizer from the actuators. A stud I94 carried by the actuating link I91 cooperates with the extension 223 of the auxiliary frame 84 to prevent unintentional upward movement of the actuating link I91 when the link is in the position shown in Fig. 14 and to prevent the link from being shifted to disengage the right-hand or left-hand branch of the slot 385 during any upward excursion of the link I91.

The actuating link I91 may be pivoted about its connection with the arm I96 to cause the right-hand and left-hand branches of the slot 385 selectively to engage the stud 386 to enable the link I 91 to be actuated thereby. This pivotal movement of the link I91 is controlled by the control slide 12 and by the transaction keys 83 according to the type of operation being performed by the machine. The manner in which the transaction keys and the control slide control the positioning of link I91 will now be explained.

The actuating link I91 carries a stud I98, which cooperates with a slot in a link I99 (Figs. 14 and 1'7). Link I99 is pivotally supported at its left end by an arm 200 carried by a stud 20I in the frame 6| and is pivotally connected at its right end to a shifting lever 202, by which it may be shifted and, through the engagement of stud I98 with the slot in link I99, cause the actuating link I91 to be pivoted to effect engagement of the right-hand or left-hand branch of the slot 385 in the link I91 with the stud 386 on the cam lever 381.

The upper end of lever 202 (Figs. 10 and 14) is pivotally supported by a stud 203 in the lower end of a lever 204, which is free on the stud 205 in the frame 6I. A link 205 connects the upper end of lever 204 to an upper extension of a cam lever 201 free on the stud 208. The lever 201 carries rollers 209 and 2I0 (Fig. 16), which cooperate, respectively, with the peripheries of companion plate cams 2 I I and 2I2 secured to the main shaft 19, which cams receive one complete clockwise rotation during each operation of the machine, The cams 2H and 2I2, during each rotation thereof, will rock the cam lever 291 and through the link 296, the lever 204 first clockwise from home position before the amount actuators move from their home position, then rock lever 204 counter-clockwise past home position after the amount actuators have completed their clockwise movement, and finall rock lever 204 clockwise to home position after the amount actuators have been restored to their home position.

A stud 391 near the lower end of lever 202 is engaged by a pair of arms 398 and 399, which are pivoted on a stud 000 in the auxiliary frame 64 and urged by spring 40I into engagement with a stud 402 in the frame 64. The arms 398 and 399 tend to maintain the lower end of lever 20'! in its neutral or home position, as shown in Fig. 14.

The stud 2I9, carried by lever 202, is adapted to cooperate with high and low control surfaces on control segments H9 and 220, which are set according to the transaction keys and with high and low control portions on the control segment 294 and the auxiliary control member 304, which are set according to the position of the control slide 12.

The operation of the lever 202 is as follows:

If the stud 2I8 is not blocked against lateral movement by a high control position on one of the control segments or the control member, clockwise and counter-clockwise movements of the lever 204 will cause the lever 202 to pivot idly about the stud 391, which is yieldingly held in neutral position by the arms 398 and 399.

If the stud 2H3 is blocked from movementto the left during the initial clockwise movement of lever 290, lever 282 will rock counter-clockwise about the stud H8 and will cause the stud 391 and the lower end of lever 202 to move to the right against the tension spring 40I. This movement of the lower end of lever 202 will, through the link I99, shift the actuating link I91 to engage the left-hand branch of the slot 385 with the stud 388 and enable the link I91 to be oper-

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2650765 *Jan 11, 1949Sep 1, 1953 Chi liang cho
US2662688 *Aug 17, 1949Dec 15, 1953AnkerSobisch
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US3001695 *Apr 14, 1955Sep 26, 1961Ncr CoTotalizer controlling mechanism for cash registers and accounting machines
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Classifications
U.S. Classification235/2, 473/71
Cooperative ClassificationG06C7/10