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Publication numberUS2454138 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 16, 1948
Filing dateOct 25, 1944
Priority dateOct 25, 1944
Publication numberUS 2454138 A, US 2454138A, US-A-2454138, US2454138 A, US2454138A
InventorsReinhold Delzer
Original AssigneeReinhold Delzer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Engine driven pump
US 2454138 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 16, 1948. R. DELZER ENGINE DRIVEN PUMP v 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 25, 1944 INVENTOR.

REINHOLD DELZER Nov. 16, 1948. R. DELZER ENGINE DRIVEN PUMP :s She'ets-Sheef 3 Filed 001;. 25, 1944 INVENTOR.

REINHOLD DELZER ATTORNEY Pmmd Nov. 16, ms

7 UNITED STATES PATENT OFF-ICE 2,454,138 ENGINE DRIVEN PUMP Reinhold Deizer, Portland, Oreg.

Application October 25, 1944, Serial No. 560,250

8 Claims. (Cl. 10344) crease the efficiency of the internal combustion engine by eliminating crank shafts, thereby dead center losses.

With my new improved engine, the power de veloped by the fuel in combustion is directly applied to the work to be performed from the time the fuel is ignited until the end of the piston stroke of the motor.

With my new and improved motor, a steady and even power is transmitted from the fuel to the piston of the motor throughout the entire stroke of the piston.

A further object of my invention is to bring additional cylinders into effect as additional power is required, or vice versa, as for instance in the take-off of an airplane a greater amount of power is required than on level flight.

By the use of my new and improved internal combustion motor fuel is saved by operating the required amount of cylinders needed for varying loads and speeds.

These and other incidental objects will be apparent in the drawing, specification and claims to follow,

Referring to the drawings:

Figure 1 is a plan view of my new and improved internal combustion engine.

Figure 2 is a side view cf Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a sectional side view, taken on line 3--3 of Figure 1', looking in the direction indicated.

Figure 4 is a fragmentary detailed sectional view of the fuel pump.

Figure 5'is a diagrammatical layout of my new andimproved engine as applied to an airplane.

In the drawings:

My new and improved engine consists of a base I, having cylinders 2 and 3 mounted thereon, and forming part thereof. The cylinders 2 and 3 are combustion cylinders and have reciprocating pistons 4 working therein. The pistons 4 are fixedly mounted to the piston rods 5, which are reciprocably mounted within stuffing boxes 6 and 'l, forming part of'the cylinder heads 8 and 9. The piston rods 5 extend into the hydraulic cylinders I and II and have pistons l2 and I3 fixedly mounted thereon. The piston rods have extensions 5A working through the stuffing boxes 14 of the cylinder heads |5 of the hydraulic cylinders l0 and II.

The combustion cylinders 2 and 3, together with the pistons 4 are of the two-cycle principle, receiving a supply of air through the port Hi from any suitable source of supply, as for instance the blower H and air pipe l8. An exhaust I port I9 is located midway the length of the cylinder and communicates with the exhaust pipe 20. Fuel is supplied to the engine cylinders 2 and 3 from the fuel pumps 2| and 22 through the piping 23 and introduced into the cylinders by the nozzles 24. The fuel pumps 2| and 22, see Figure 4, consists of the cylinder 2| having a piston 34 working therein, The piston is forced to the left by the spring 34.pulling the fuel through the check valve into the chamber 35' from the supply line 68. A throttle control valve 61 governs the amount of fuel entering the lines 33 from the supply line 66, which gets its supply from any suitable source, as the base tank I. The throttle valve 61 is operated by the control lever 69. The fuel pumps are operated by the extended piston rods 5A contacting the piston rod 33 of the fuel pump, moving the piston against the spring 34 forcing the fuel out of the chamber 35 through the check valve 35" into the line 23 to the nozzles 24 described later.

In my new and improved internal combustion engine, the power developed by the pistons 4 within the cylinders 2 and 3 is transmitted by hydraulic means to motors, turbines or hydraulic cylinders located at remote points, the operation of which I will now describe. Located at the outer extremities of the cylinders l0 and II are suitable rotary valves 25, 26, 21 and 28. The valves 25 and 26 communicate with a hydraulic liquid supply 29 contained within the base I of the engine through the piping 30. The valves 2'! and 28 are connected to the compensating tank 5| by the manifolds 32. The compensating tank 5| provides a pressure reservoir which may have an air cushion arrangement therein for cushioning the pulsations developed by the pistons l2 and I3.

Referring to Figure 3, the piston I3 is at the extreme left of the cylinder II, also the power piston 4 is located at the extreme left of the cylinder 2, as is the case with the piston |2 relative to the cylinder Ill. When the foregoing pistons are in the location shown, the extension 5A of the piston rod 5 has Just forced the piston rod 33 of the fuel pump 22 towards the pump, causing the piston 34 to force the fuel out of the chamber 35 through the pipe 23 and nozzle 24 into the compression chamber 36 of the engine.

I have illustrated my engine of the high comwhich will be more fully described later. As the piston l3 was moved to the right, in the direction of the arrow, hydraulic liquid was pulled from the supply 29 through the piping 30, valve 26 and into the-cylinder ready to be forced into the compensating tank 5| when the piston |3 returns to thev position shown.

Referring to Figure 3, when the power piston 4 is located as shown, the gases within the combustion chamber 31 were exhausted out of the exhaust port ill, at the same time this occurred fresh air was forced in through the port It into the chamber 31 throughthe air conduit I8. When the charge was exploded in the combustion space 35, forcing the piston in the direction of the arrow, the air received through the port It was compressed within the combustion chamber 31. When the piston assembly reaches the end of its stroke, the fuel pump 2| will inject fuel into the combustion chamber 31, firing and causing the piston 4 to travel in the opposite direction of the arrow, Figure 3. When the. piston assembly reaches the position shown by the broken lines l5, l6 and 11 just before the exhaust port l9 eject fuel into the space 31 at which time it will be fired forcing the piston assembly to the left until the rear ends I of the pistons reach the dotted line positions 15, 1-6 and 11 where the valve 28 will be opened allowing pressure from the tank to enter behind the piston l2 continuing the travel of the piston assembly to the position shown in the drawings.

opened the following valve action takes place.

The end 38 of the piston rod 5A contacts the bell cranks 45 at 40 rocking them about their centers 4|, forcing the connecting links 42 and 43 to the right, or in the direction of the arrow, which will manipulate the valves 25, 26, 21 and 28. The valve 26 will be opened while the valve 21 will be closed. This will relieve the pressure within the cylinder into the supply tank 29. The valve 28 will be open and the valve will be closed allowing a back feed from the compensating tank 5| through the valve 28 behind the piston I2, causing the piston assembly to continue to move in the opposite direction of the arrow to the end of its stroke. The back feed from the compensating tank against the piston i2 takes the place of a fly wheel, forcing the piston to the end of its stroke, while the exhaust port of the cylinder 2 is open and the air port I6 is admitting air into the space 31. When the piston assembly reaches the end of its stroke the piston rod extension 5A will operate the fuel pump 22 and valve assembly continually repeating the above cycle of operations.

In other words, when the power piston 4 is forced in either direction it has to travel beyond the exhaust port I9. Therefore when the piston 4 passes the port I 9, the power is reduced to practically nothing dueto the relief of exhaust and combustible material. To insure the full travel of the piston to complete the cycle, pressure is relieved from the compensating tank 5| against either of the pistons l2 or l3, and at the same time the valves 25 and 26 to the supply tank 29 are closed to prevent the escape of hydraulic fluid from the cylinders l0 and The pressure from the tank 5| then forces the full travel of the piston rod and piston assembly.

Referring to Figure 3, the position of all of the parts are such that we are ready to combust the material within the cylinder at 36, which will force the pistons 4, 2 and I3 to the right until the end 38 of the piston rod 5A strikes the cams of the bell cranks 39 opening the valve 21 admitting hydraulic pressure from the reservoir 5| forcing the piston l3 furtherto the right and carrying the power piston 4 over its dead center on the exhaust port.

At the same time the ejector pump 2| will It will be noted in Figure 3 that when the piston I3 is travelling to the right the valve' 26 is open drawing in fresh hydraulic fluid from the tank 29 and when this piston reaches the point whereby hydraulics must be employed to cause it to continue its travel after the power stroke has been expended within the cylinder 2 the valve 26 will be closed and the valve 21 will be opened so that when hydraulic pressure fluid is delivered through the pipe and valve 21 it will not escape through the valve 26. By referring to valves 25 and 28 in the present position this position is quite well illustrated relative to the valves.

I have provided flexible bumpers 48 connected adjacent the fuel pumps 2| and 22 for arresting the travel of the piston assembly at the end of the stroke.

Referring to Figure 5, I have shown a diagrammatical illustration of my new and improved internal combustion engine and its associated power take-offs. I illustrate two engine assemblies 49 and 50 having their compensating tanks 5| and 52 connected to the manifolds 53 and 54 by suitable piping connections and control valves 56. Turbine motors 51, 58, 59 and 60 are located within the wings of the plane and have propellers 6| mounted thereon. The motor turbines receive their hydraulic liquid under pressure through the piping 62, and the exhaust from the turbines returns to the motor through the piping 63, which connects to the oil reserves 29 within the base by way of the connection 64. The different turbines can be controlled by the valves 65, and any number of the turbines can be shut down when so desired, or one of the engines 49 or 50 can be completely closed down, thereby conserving on fuel, which is one of the primary objects of my invention.

With my new and improved assembly of internal combustion engines and hydraulic drive considerable reserve power is available when needed. It will be noted that I have eliminated the crank shafts, connecting rod and wrist pins that heretofore have been troublesome in the following manner. When the pistons were on top center and the combustion or explosion was of its most efficient nature, considerable resistance was offered to the movement of the piston due to the angular relation of the connecting rod, crank shaft and cylinder. In my new and improved motor when combustion takes place all of its energy can be expended into direct power against a hydraulic head, which in turn is delivered to motors and the likewhich receive hydraulic pressure from the beginning of the explosion and travel of the pistons to the end of their stroke.

I do not wish to be limited to the mechanical mechanism as herein illustrated, as other forms of mechanical embodiment may be employed still coming within the scope of my claims.

I claim:

1. A power plant including an internal combustion engine, a hydraulic pump having a movable pump member operated by the engine, a fuel injector for the engine and having a movable amu injector member operated by the movement of the movable pump member. a pressure tank for storing and distributing the power from the hydraulic pump for further power use, and valved mechanism having an operating member operated by the movementoi the movable pump member-when it moves the movable fuel injector member for controlling the admission of the pressure medium to the hydraulic pump and the ission of such power medium from the hydraulic pump to the pressure tank.

2. A powerplant including duplicate internal combustion engines, oppositely acting hydraulic compressors in alignment with and having pistons operated by each internal combustion engine. a pressure tank common to all hydraulic compressors for controlling and distributing the power developed by said compressor, means for admitting a power medium under pressure to each hydraulic compressor, means for admitting the power medium under pressure from each hydraulic compressor to p the pressure tank, fuel injectors for the engine and having movable injector members operated by the movement of the pistons of the hydraulic compressors, and means operated by the movement of the hydraulic pistons when they operate the injector members of the fuel injectors to automatically control the admission of the power medium to each hydraulic compressor and to control the flow of such power medium under pressure from each compressor to the storage tank.

3. A power plant comprising duplicate internal combustion engines, each including a cylinder, a piston rod reciprocating in the cylinder and a piston on said rod, a hydraulic compressor at each end of and beyond the cylinder of each internal combustion engine, each of said hydraulic compressors including a piston mounted upon extensions of the piston rod of the internal combustion engine, a fuel injector arranged beyond each hydraulic compressor and operated by an extension of the piston rod of the internal combustion engine, means for admitting fuel under pressure from the fuel injectors to the opposite ends of the cylinder of each internal combustion engine, means for admitting air under pressure to each cylinder of the internal combustion engine, a pressure tank common to all hydraulic compressors for collecting and distributing the power developed by said compressors, and valved mechanism for controlling the admission of the pressure medium to each hydraulic compressor and the flow of the pressure medium under pressure to the pressure tank, said valved mechanism of each internal combustion engine being automatically operated by the piston rod extensions as they operate the respective fuel injectors of each internal combustion engine.

4. A power plant including duplicate internal combustion engine assemblies, each comprising an internal combustion engine cylinder, a piston rod operative therein, a piston on the piston rod, a hydraulic compressor in line with and beyond each end of the internal combustion cylinder, a fuel injector beyond and in line with each hydraulic compressor, the piston rod being extended in both directions beyond the cylinder of the internal combustion engine to operate the hydraulic compressors and the fuel injectors beyond the ends of the hydraulic compressors, a

valve for admitting a hydraulic medium to each hydraulic compressor, a valve for admitting the hydraulic medium under pressure from the hydraulic compressors, a pressure tank common to both internal combustion engine assemblies and for collecting and distributing the power developed by said compressors, said pressure tank being served by said last named valves, means for simultaneously and reversely operating the admission valves of the hydraulic compressors of each internal combustion engine assembly, means for simultaneously and reversely operating the valves directing power medium under pressure from thehydraulic compressors of each internal combustion engine assembly, and means operated in the movement of the piston rod leading to the fuel injectors for simultaneously operating all said means. 7

5. A construction as defined in claim 4 wherein each cylinder of the internal combustion engine is mounted'upon a hollow base to serve as'a tank for the hydraulic medium and means leading from such hollow. base to each hydraulic compressor admission:valve.v

6. A construction as defined in claim 4 wherein the means for operating the valves of the hydraulic compressors include rods connected to said valves and means on the piston rods leading to each fuel injector for actuating the rods.

7. A construction as defined in claim 4, wherein the internal combustion engines of each assembly are of the two-cycle type and wherein an exhaust outlet communicates with each cylinder intermediate the stroke of-the piston.

8. An internal combustion engine, comprising a combustion chamber, having a reciprocating piston working therein, auxiliary cylinders arranged in line with the combustion cylinder and having reciprocating pistons mounted therein, means for charging the auxiliary cylinders with a hydraulic fluid and discharging the same therefrom under pressure of the pistons working therein, said hydraulic cylinder pistons being moved longitudinally of their cylinders by thepiston working within the combustion cylinder, a valve assembly connected with the hydraulic cylinders for controlling the intake and discharge of the hydraulic fluid, said valve assembly being operated by the reciprocating movement of the hydraulic cylinder pistons, fuel oil pumps for injecting fuel into the combustion cylinder. said pumps being operated by the reciprocating movement of the hydraulic cylinder pistons.

REINHOID DELZER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the Q file of this patent:

' unrrnn STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
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US1737976 *Jul 9, 1927Dec 3, 1929Richard C SchwoererInternal-combustion engine
US1827438 *Sep 10, 1928Oct 13, 1931Rauch John DAirplane
US1879717 *Jun 15, 1929Sep 27, 1932Sikorsky Aviat CorpPneumatically operated and controlled aircraft
US2292288 *May 31, 1938Aug 4, 1942Soc Es Energie SaMeans for driving the propelling system of aircraft
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3018627 *Apr 17, 1958Jan 30, 1962Martin Marietta CorpRechargeable accumulator
US3031972 *Jun 17, 1957May 1, 1962Hermann JanickeFree piston engine driven pump assembly
US3253806 *May 20, 1964May 31, 1966Eickmann KarlControl means in a hydraulic driven helicopter
US3614029 *Jun 12, 1970Oct 19, 1971Eickmann KarlAdded fluidflow control means for governing the attitude of fluidborne vehicles
US3768757 *Jul 12, 1972Oct 30, 1973K EickmannFluid-borne vehicle
US3790105 *Apr 6, 1971Feb 5, 1974K EickmanHydraulically controlled fluid stream driven vehicle
US3806066 *Aug 6, 1971Apr 23, 1974Eickmann KHydrostatic synchronization device for counter-revolving and co-axial rotors
US3823898 *Mar 8, 1971Jul 16, 1974K EickmannHydraulically controlled fluidstream-driven aircraft
US3878821 *Nov 15, 1973Apr 22, 1975White Norman CCombustion engine with double-ended pistons and transfer passages
US3977302 *May 2, 1974Aug 31, 1976Karl EickmannFluid motor with releasable coupling
US3983833 *Feb 21, 1975Oct 5, 1976Karl EickmannHydraulically controlled fluidstream driven waterborn vehicle
US4009849 *Jul 10, 1974Mar 1, 1977Karl EickmannFluid-stream driven aircraft
US4086768 *Sep 8, 1975May 2, 1978Karl EickmannDriving and controlling unit
US4230198 *Jan 3, 1978Oct 28, 1980Karl EickmannFluid-stream driven ground vehicle
US4452411 *Oct 2, 1981Jun 5, 1984Karl EickmannDevices which may be borne in air and in devices applicable therein
US4620836 *Nov 10, 1982Nov 4, 1986Gerhard BrandlOil pump with oscillating piston
DE1113334B *Jul 11, 1958Aug 31, 1961Max BochskanlGasturbine in Verbindung mit einem Gaserzeuger
DE1128707B *Nov 21, 1958Apr 26, 1962Max BochskanlGasturbine in Verbindung mit einem Gaserzeuger
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/318, 417/515, 244/60, 123/46.00R, 123/46.00A, 123/61.00R, 417/364, 417/397, 60/595
International ClassificationB64C11/00
Cooperative ClassificationB64C11/00, B64D2700/62701
European ClassificationB64C11/00