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Publication numberUS2454585 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 23, 1948
Filing dateFeb 13, 1945
Priority dateFeb 13, 1945
Publication numberUS 2454585 A, US 2454585A, US-A-2454585, US2454585 A, US2454585A
InventorsAlderman Elbert N
Original AssigneeAlderman Elbert N
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flushing device for engine lubricating systems
US 2454585 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 23, 1948. Q N, ALDERMAN- 2,454,585

FLUSHING DEVICE FOR ENGINE wsmcnme SYSTEMS Filed Feb. 13, 1945 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 W a s Q k I: s w

m'enmr Nov. 23, 1948. E. N. ALDERMAN 2,454,585

muspme nsvIcB r'on zuaxnn'nusazcnme sYs'rEMs Filed Feb. 13, 1945 Sheets-Sheet 2 In. max, Lava 60 740" Luv:

' Inventor Z'Zerf/Yflldermm Patented Nov. 23, 1948 FLUSHING DEVICE FOR ENGINE LUBRICATING SYSTEMS Elbert N. Alderman, El Dorado, Kans. Application February 18, 1945, Serial No. 577,682

5 Claims.

This invention relates to an apparatus or device which is expressly designed to forcibly circulate a given amount of oil and solvent in the lubricating systems of internal combustion engines, primarily so-called automobiles and trucks.

More specifically, the device is constructed to maintain a proper oil level while circulating oil through a filter, thus flushing'out and removing carbon, sludge, water, dirt, varnish and other deposits. these being loosened by suitable solvent oils.

Briefly, the solvent oil is pumped from a suitable reservoir through a gear pump equipped with a by-pass valve to regulate proper pressure, is then pumped through a suitable large filter, and from the filter through a flexible hose to the engine filler neck. Then, when aproper amount of solvent oil has been pumped into the engine, the flow of oil is switched from the oil reservoir 01 my device to oil drain plugs of the engine by a flexible hose which circulates solvent oil through the engine. the engine running during this period, maintaining a proper level in the engine and flushing out and filtering dirt and deposit from the engine.

In carrying out the principles of the invention, I have evolved and produced a simple and expedient structural arrangement characterized by the aforementioned solvent reservoir and associated filter, these coasting with a single gear 1 pump by way of appropriate valved pipe connections, and selectively usable hose lines, appropriately valved, and associated with said pipes to direct and properly regulate the circulatory steps.

Other features and advantages will become more readily apparent from the following description and the accompanying illustrative drawings.

In the drawings, wherein like numerals are employed to designate likeparts throughout the views:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view of an apparatus constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention;

I Figure 2 is a relatively small top plan view oi the assemblage seen in Figure 1, showing the valved delivery line leading to the crankcase;

Figure 3. is likewise a top plan view like Figure 2 showing the valved delivery line flexed around and connected to the solvent reservoir, for fluid return Figure 4 is a sectional and elevational view detailing the filter; v

Figure 5 is a horizontal section on the line 5-5 of Figure 4, looking in the directionof the arrows.

Referring now to the drawings by distinguishing reference numerals. the oil filter tank is denoted at I and is provided on its interior (see Fig. 4) with an appropriate filtering cartridge unit 2 01' the replaceable type as shown. The

numeral I designates a vent pipe having a suitable control valve 3a, said pipe being connected with a reservoir to be hereinafter described. The tank I is provided with a conical cover 4 which permits access to be had to the filter for cleaning and repacking the filter unit or cartridge. This cover is held in place by bolts 5. The aforementioned filter unit 2 embodies a perforated tube 6 for discharging the clean 01], and this screws into the filter tank at the bottom.

A solvent-containing reservoir 8, together with. tank I are supported on stand I, as is clearly shown in Figure 1. Reservoir 8 includes a sight gauge 9 to show when the proper amount of solvent oil has been pumped from the reservoir to the engine crankcase (not shown). Numeral Iii denotes a valve closing the discharge of oil from filter tank i, and section line H denotes a hose with a valve 24 on its outer end, said hose serving as the return line from the engine crankcase to 25 the devicethe purpose thereof soon to be more fully explained.

A pipe it connects with the gear pump i8, and a pipe it leads from the center of one side of the pump to tank i, as shown in Figure 1. Nu-

meral I 4 denotes a relatively small filter or trap for large pieces of carbon and other foreign matter to prevent their passage into gear pump IS.

A valve I5 prevents the back new of oil from filter i when cleaning the small filter trap It. A

pipe 25 connects to the bottom of reservoir 8 by means of a union I1 and terminates in trap 84.

Suction line I I terminates in T-connection in pipe 25 adjacent its point of entry into filter it. A

valve I B in pipe 25, between suction line H and reservoir 8, controls the oil flow from the reservoir to filter tank l.

A flexible drive connection is is provided between the electric motor 20 and the gear pump it. A one-quarter horsepower electric motor will do, for a purpose later to be described.

Numeral 2! is a hose leading from tank I and serves as the delivery line for filtered oil from tank I to the engine, or as the return hose to the supply reservoir 8 as will appear hereinafter. A

pressure regulating by-pass valve 22 is provided and is in communication with the pipes l2 and II. This serves to by-pass oil from the discharge connection of the gear pump back to the inlet connection of said pump in case the pressure in the oil filter I-exceeds the pressure setting of said pressure regulating by-pass valve. An oil pressure gauge is shown at 23, and ismounted on the conicalbottom oi the filter.

The flushing machine reservoir 8 is filled with solvent oil. With valve 2 1 closed and valves II and I6 and I open, and with hose 2i run back to reservoir 8 (see Fig. 3), motor 20 drives gear pump [8, pumping oil irom reservoir 8 through valve it through small filter it, through valve id to the inlet i2 of gear pump l8. It is then pumped through outlet is into filter tank I,

through filter element 2, filter outlet tube 6, valve it, hose 2| and then back to reservoir 8. During the above circulation vent as is opened to permit the escape of air. When the filter is completely primed, vent to is closed and enough solvent added to reservoir 8 to bring the oil level to the top oi gauge 9. The device is now ready for operation.

The used motor oil is now drained from crankcase of engine to be serviced. Then I connect valve 24 to the crankcase or receptacle drain with valve it closed. With the motor 20 shut oil. I connect hose 2! to the receptacle with valves i8, I and I0 open. Then I start motor and fill th engine crankcase with solvent until the connecting rods (not shown) will splash in solvent oil, while the engine is running. It is necessary to check the drain hole in the engine fly wheel cover to be sure that it is open so if any solvent oil should go into fiy wheel housing it can drain out and avoid depositing of solvent oil on the clutch. When the proper oil level is attained in crankcase, valve I8 is closed and valve 2! is opened. This will permit oil to circulate from crankcase drain, through filters 4 and 2, back through valve i0 and hose 2! back to the engine. This procedure is maintained with the engine running until the solvent oil has loosened and carried out all possible dirt, carbon, gum, varnish, etc. There will be some foaming oi oil in filter i, which will have to be bled out or filter through vent valve to, back to supply reservoir 8, and thereby some solvent oil will be carried back to supply reservoir which will have to be pumped back to the engine crankcase by cracking valve is occasionally. When the crankcase becomes clean, the engine is turned oil, and valve I0 is closed. Hose 21 isremoved from the connected engine to supply reservoir 8. Valve i0 is opened and solvent oil in the crankcase is turned to supply reservoir 8. Then valve 26 is closed and line H is disconnected from the crankcase. Motor 20 is shut or! and the engine crankcase ls refilled with new motor oil.

A careful consideration of the foregoing description in conjunction with the invention as illustrated in the drawings will enable the reader to obtain a clear understanding and impression of the alleged features of merit and novelty sufllcient to clarify the construction oi the invention as hereinafter claimed.

Minor changes in shape, size, materials and re-arrangement of parts may be resorted to in actual practice so long as no departure ismade from the invention as claimed.

I claim.

1. An apparatus for cleansing a crankcase of an engine and the like, comprising, a motor driven pump, a filtering device, a fluid storage chamber, and means including said pump for selectively circulating fluid for cleansing between said storage chamber and said filtering device and additional means including said pump for optionally circulating fiuid between said filtering device and said crankcase, and means for venting said filtering device to said storage chamber.

2. An apparatus for cleansing a crankcase 01 an engine comprising, a motor driven pump, a filtering device, a cleaning fluid storage tank having an outlet, a conduit between said storage tank outlet and the inlet side oi said pump. a delivery passage irom the discharge side of said pump to said filtering device, a delivery conduit from said filtering device to said crankcase and a return line from said crankcase to said conduit, and means for causing circulation of cleaning fiuid from said pump to said filtering device, thence to said crankcase while the engine is running and thence to said inlet side oi said pump, and a valve in said conduit said valve being operable to selectively admit additional fiuid to said circulatory system.

3. An apparatus for cleansing a crankcase oi.

an engine comprising, a motor driven pump, a

filtering device, a cleaning fiuid storage tank having an outlet, a conduit between said storage tank outlet and the inlet side of said pump, a delivery passage from the discharge side of said pump to said filtering device. a delivery conduit from said filtering device to said crankcase and a return line from said crankcase to said conduit, and means for causing circulation of cleaning fiuid from said pump to said filtering device, thence to said crankcase while the engine is running and thence to said inlet side of said pump, and a valve in said conduit said valve being operable to selectively admit additional fluid to said circulatory system, and a sediment trap disposed in said connecting passage.

4. Means for cleansing an engine crankcase during operation oi said engine comprising means for initially supplying cleaning fiuid to said crankcase and means for cyclically withdrawing fluid from said crankcase, additional means for cleansing and filtering and releasing entrapped oil from said withdrawn fluid and returning said withdrawn and cleansed fiuid while maintaining a constant fiuid supply in said crankcase during engine operation.

5. A method 01 clean sing an engine crankcase comprising, supplying cleaning fiuid to said crankcase, continuousl withdrawing fiuid from said crankcase while returning cleansed fiuid thereto at a sufiicie'nt rate to maintain a constant quantity or fluid in said crankcase, promoting turbulence in said fiuld in said crankcase by operating said engine and cleansing said withdrawn fiuid preparatory to its return to said crankcase and intermittently releasing entrapped oil from said circulatory cleaning fiuid.

ELBERT N. ALDERM AN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2685347 *Mar 26, 1951Aug 3, 1954Busby Marvin LMethod of cleaning lubricant chambers and the lubricant therein
US2974071 *Dec 21, 1953Mar 7, 1961Morris Frank ELine cleaning process
US3128779 *Mar 2, 1961Apr 14, 1964Frank E MorrisLine cleaning equipment
US3197339 *Apr 15, 1963Jul 27, 1965British Iron Steel ResearchFluid cushioning systems
US3431145 *Nov 12, 1964Mar 4, 1969Riley Frank DMethod for flushing and cleaning internal combustion engines
US5062398 *Apr 27, 1990Nov 5, 1991K. J. ManufacturingApparatus and method for changing oil in an internal combustion engine with optional flushing
US5090376 *Feb 21, 1991Feb 25, 1992K.J. Manufacturing Co.Main gallery - filter connection
US5094201 *May 30, 1991Mar 10, 1992K.J. Manufacturing Co.Main gallery-filter connection
US5145033 *Jul 17, 1990Sep 8, 1992K.J. Manufacturing Co.Sandwich adapter reusable oil filter mounted to same and process for using the same
US5209198 *Sep 26, 1989May 11, 1993K.J. Manufacturing Co.Process for simple and high speed oil change and/or flushing the engine oil distribution channels of the moving components of the crankcase in an internal combustion engine
US5232513 *Aug 28, 1991Aug 3, 1993Suratt Ted LEngine cleaning processes
US5249608 *Dec 6, 1991Oct 5, 1993Lee W. TowerProcess and flushing device for removing oil from waste oil filters
US5263445 *Jun 13, 1991Nov 23, 1993K.J. Manufacturing Co.Apparatus and method for changing oil in an internal combustion engine and simultaneously determining engine oil consumption and wear
US5383481 *Oct 30, 1992Jan 24, 1995Erik WaelputSystem for cleaning internal combustion engines
US5441101 *Jan 8, 1993Aug 15, 1995Johnsson; John C. S.Recycling machine
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US5467746 *Dec 27, 1993Nov 21, 1995Waelput; Erik F. M.Adapters for flushing an internal combustion engine
US5887606 *Nov 4, 1997Mar 30, 1999Tsou; JohnPurifying device for cleaning combustion chamber of car engine
US5957170 *Nov 12, 1997Sep 28, 1999K. J. Manufacturing Co.Apparatus and method for changing oil in an internal combustion engine and simultaneously determining engine oil consumption and wear
US5964256 *Aug 19, 1993Oct 12, 1999K.J. ManufacturingApparatus and method for changing oil in an internal combustion engine and simultaneously determining engine oil consumption and wear
US6298947 *Oct 27, 2000Oct 9, 2001Robert E. FlynnEngine oil cleaning system
US7150286 *Jul 2, 2003Dec 19, 2006Rpm Industries, Inc.Methods and systems for performing, monitoring and analyzing multiple machine fluid processes
US7793681Nov 8, 2006Sep 14, 2010RPM Industries, LLCMethods and systems for performing, monitoring and analyzing multiple machine fluid processes
US9062575Apr 8, 2004Jun 23, 2015RPM Industries, LLCMethods and systems for performing, monitoring and analyzing multiple machine fluid processes
US20040020720 *Mar 30, 2001Feb 5, 2004Flynn Robert EEngine oil cleaning system
US20040211470 *Jul 2, 2003Oct 28, 2004Apostolides John K.Methods and systems for performing, monitoring and analyzing multiple machine fluid processes
US20050173004 *Apr 8, 2004Aug 11, 2005Apostolides John K.Methods and systems for performing, monitoring and analyzing multiple machine fluid processes
US20070113894 *Nov 8, 2006May 24, 2007Rpm Industries, Inc.Methods and systems for performing, monitoring and analyzing multiple machine fluid processes
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WO2002034422A1 *Mar 30, 2001May 2, 2002Flynn Robert EEngine oil cleaning system
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/10, 210/441, 134/111, 134/169.00A, 210/167.2, 134/23, 184/1.5, 134/24
International ClassificationB01D37/00
Cooperative ClassificationB01D37/00
European ClassificationB01D37/00