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Publication numberUS2456102 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 14, 1948
Filing dateMar 29, 1946
Priority dateMar 29, 1946
Publication numberUS 2456102 A, US 2456102A, US-A-2456102, US2456102 A, US2456102A
InventorsJoseph Agostinelli
Original AssigneeJoseph Agostinelli
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heel counter reinforcement
US 2456102 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 14, 1948. J. AGOSTI/NELLI 2,456,102

HEEL COUNTER REINFORCEMENT Filed March 29, 1946 2'7 .7, a pg-9 i K 1, 1a -zzziiizfi /////////////z am, WWW

' Wain-M I "1 777021% Patented Dec. 14, 1948 UNITED I TATE oEFlc -i;

l.- I 1 .lw HEEL COUNTER REINFORCEMENT J osephf A'gostinelli, Detroit. Mich, Application March 29, 1946; Serial No; 658,337

My'invention relates to anew and usefulimprovement in a heel reenforcement and is adapted for use on footwear and particularly leather footwear such as boots, shoes and the like. EX- perience has shown that with shoes which are worn a short time, the heel is pressed out of its proper position and sags laterally. This sagging of the heel or counter of the shoe is generally towards the outside of the shoe, in such cases the counter of the heel or shoe does sag towards the inside. When the counter of the heel sags the heel of the wearer is thus thrown out of proper alignment with the remaining portion of the shoe with the result that discomfort is experienced and proper walking prevented.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a reenforcement for a counter in a heel which will prevent the sagging of either side and which will serve to retain the counter and heel portion of the shoe in proper alignment to the remaining portion of the shoe.

Another object of the invention is to the provision of a reenforcement for a heel counter whereby the foot of the wearer will be retained in proper position relatively to the remaining portion of the shoe and excessive wear on the low side of the heel will be prevented.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a bendable portion on a heel counter reenforcement so that it may be bent inwardly to always provide a snug fit of the upper portion of the counter with the foot of the wearer.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a heel counter reenforcement so constructed and arranged that greater comfort in walking may be accomplished.

Other objects will appear hereinafter.

It is recognized that various modifications and changes may be made in the detail of structure illustrated without departing from the invention itself and it is intended that these shall be embraced within the claims which form a part hereof.

Forming a part of this application are drawing in which,

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of the reenforcemerit,

Fig. 2 is a central sectional view of the invention showing it applied,

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on line 33 of Fig. 2,

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on line 44 of Fig. 2.

In the drawings I have illustrated the invention applied to a shoe 20 having a heel counter 2 Claims. (01.136968).

' embodying-:the outerlayer 1 l 8.and the inner layer l9 and a fiber reenforcement member 38 that embraces the heel or counter of the shoe. As shown in Fig. 2, the portion 22 of the counter is positioned rearwardly on the point 23 at which the counter turns upwardly. The reenforcement comprises a shank or plate 9 formed from rigid material, preferably resilient metal. This shank or plate 9 is positioned to lie between the sole l6 and the sole I1 and is secured in position by suitable securing means projected through the openings 24. The rear end of the body 9 is formed concave as at 25, this concavity being positioned centrally of the body 9 and being adapted to accommodate the in-turned portion of the outer layer l8 of the counter. Projecting outwardly from the rear portion of the body 9 at opposite sides are the tongues I0 and [2, each of these tongues being curved upwardly as at l l and I3 respectively and lie between the fibre member and outer covering 18. These tongues are cut away on their inner side as at 26 so that the upwardly turned portion projects forwardly as clearly shown in Fig. 1 and Fig. 2. These tongues, with the upwardly curved portion, may be termed reenforcement side flaps on the end of the body 9.

It is believed obvious from an examination of Fig. 2, that the member I0 is more easily bendable at its free end than adjacent the end where it is attached to the body 9 and that the farther this distance is projected the more easily bendable becomes the material. Consequently, it will appear obvious that the counter of the shoe is rigidly reenforced adjacent its lower portion so as to prevent lateral sagging while the reenforcement member upwardly thereof may be bent inwardly by pressure of the hand, thus allowing the wearer to bend the upper portion inwardly so that the counter will fit snugly about the heel of the foot.

Experience has shown that a shoe with a heel counter reenforcement of this type mounted therein will be more comfortable to the wearer and that the wearer, because the sagging of the counter is prevented and the wearers heel is kept in proper alignment to the remaining portion of the shoe, will find more comfort in wearing the shoe and less fatigue in walking.

It will be noted that the side flap or tongue I2 is of less height than the side flap or tongue in. This lower side reenforcement is positioned on the inner side of the shoe as the tendency to sag inwardly is much less than the tendency 3 to sag outwardly and less resistance is required on the inner side of the heel counter.

What I claim as new is:

1. A shoe heel counter reenforcement member the heels counter, one of said "flaps being. of.

greater height and length than the other.

2. A shoe heel counter reenforcement ot the class described comprising an elongated rigid metallic body formed from resilient material and having one end curved concave-and adapted forpositioning between the soles of a shoe with the concave end accommodating the in-turned par tion of the outer layer of the shoe heel counter; a reenforcing flap projecting outwardly from op- 4 posite sides of said body adjacent said concave end and thence curved upwardly and projected forwardly the upper portions of said flaps being bendable, said flaps :being positioned between the outer and inner layers of the shoe heel counter, one of said flaps being of greater height and length than the other.

JOSEPH AGOSTINELLI.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the .file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date I l 81,690 Savoy Sept. 1, 1868 379,980 Prouty Mar. 27, 1888 1,041,499 Maciarz Oct. 15, 1912 1,176,198 Britts W- Mar. 21, 1916 7 1,637,897 Eddins Aug. 2, 1927

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US81690 *Sep 1, 1868 savoy
US379980 *Jan 20, 1888Mar 27, 1888 Supporter for boots or shoes
US1041499 *Mar 30, 1912Oct 15, 1912Frank MaciarzShoe-support.
US1176198 *Jun 19, 1915Mar 21, 1916Bancroft B BrittsHeel and instep stiffener.
US1637897 *Mar 24, 1924Aug 2, 1927Cordo Hyde CoShoe and process of making the same
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4622764 *Nov 13, 1984Nov 18, 1986Societe Technisynthese SarlShoes with supple soles, notably sports-shoes
US6092305 *May 6, 1998Jul 25, 2000Footwear Concept Center, Inc.Footwear structure and method of forming the same
US6519876Jul 5, 2000Feb 18, 2003Kenton Geer Design Associates, Inc.Footwear structure and method of forming the same
US6601042May 17, 2000Jul 29, 2003Robert M. LydenCustomized article of footwear and method of conducting retail and internet business
US6701643Dec 3, 2002Mar 9, 2004Kenton Geer Design Associates, Inc.Footwear structure and method of forming the same
US7016867May 21, 2002Mar 21, 2006Lyden Robert MMethod of conducting business including making and selling a custom article of footwear
US7059067Nov 14, 2003Jun 13, 2006Kenton D. GeerFootwear structure and method of forming the same
US7107235Oct 24, 2002Sep 12, 2006Lyden Robert MMethod of conducting business including making and selling a custom article of footwear
US7591083Jun 13, 2006Sep 22, 2009Kenton D. GeerFootwear structure and method of forming the same
US8381416Oct 26, 2010Feb 26, 2013Kenton D. GeerFootwear structure and method of forming the same
WO2001067907A1 *Mar 8, 2001Sep 20, 2001Robert M LydenFootwear having spring element and removable components
WO2001082732A1 *May 1, 2000Nov 8, 2001Kenton Geer Design AssociatesFootwear structure and method of forming the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/68, 36/76.00R
International ClassificationA43B23/10, A43B23/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B23/10
European ClassificationA43B23/10