Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2457153 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 28, 1948
Filing dateFeb 3, 1945
Priority dateFeb 3, 1945
Publication numberUS 2457153 A, US 2457153A, US-A-2457153, US2457153 A, US2457153A
InventorsHarvey Hubbell
Original AssigneeHarvey Hubbell
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sealed switch
US 2457153 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 28, 1948. H.`HUBBELL v '2,457,153

SEALED SWITCH Filed Feb. 3, 1945 2 sneeze-'sheet 1 H. HUBBELL SEALED swITcH Dec.' 28, 1948.

2 sheets-sheet a Filed Feb. 3. .1945

Patented Dec.v 28, 1948 UNITEDA STATES PATENT OFFICE 'SEALEDl SWITCH Harvey Hubbell, Long Hill, Conn.

Application February 3, 1945, Serial No. 575,958

This invention relates to electrical switches and has for an object to provide an improved and simplified construction in which the switch contacts are sealed from the outer atmosphere so that there is no danger of igniting surrounding objects or gases by arcing of the contactsand the contacts are protected from corrosion and deterioration from atmospheric conditions.

Another object is to provide an improved construction in which the enclosing and sealing means includes a flexible wall portion which may or may not be of insulating material, but is preferably of` such material, and is adapted to be flexed for shifting a movable contact relative to another contact for making or breaking a circuit.

With the foregoing and other objects in view I have devised the construction illustrated in the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification. It is, however, to be understood the invention is not limited to the specific construction and arrangement shown but may embody various changes and modifications Within the scope of the invention.

In these drawings:

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal section through a switch constructed according to my invention;

Fig. 2 is a transverse section thereof on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a section similar to Fig. 1 showing a somewhat modified construction; Y

Fig. 4 is a transverse section substantially on the line 4-4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a section similar to Figs. 1 and 3 showing another somewhat modied construction;

Fig. 6 is a transverse section substantially on 1 the line 6-#6 of Fig. 5;

Fig. '7 is a side elevation of another modified construction of the switch; y

Fig. 8 is a transverse section thereof substantially on line 8-8 of Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 is a longitudinal section of this switch; Fig. 10 is a partial side elevation of vanother modication, a portion of the enclosing flexible tubular member being broken away and the enclosed elements being shown in side elevation,

and

Fig. 11 is a transverse section substantially on line I I of Fig. 10.

Referring rst to Figs. 1 and 2, the device shown by way of example comprises an insulating base member I0 on which are mounted a pair of switch contacts I I and I2. These contacts may be mounted in various ways, but they are preferably mounted on conductors I3 and I4 respectively 14 Claims. (C1200-168) shape as shown and the free upper portion thereof may be rigid or yieldable somewhat as desired. The contact I2y is a movable spring contact of resilient strip metal movable relative to the stationary contact II. In the present arrangement it .is shown as spaced above the contact I I when in the open or circuit breaking position, and by its resilient action tends to move away from it to break the circuit, but it may be shifted toward and from the contact II, as indicated in dotted lines Fig. 1. It will of course be understood the contact arrangement may be reversed so that instead of the'resilient spring action of the contact I2 tending to shift it away from the stationary contact I I to open the circuit, they may be arranged so that it tends to move toward the stationary contact to close the circuit.

These contacts are closed and sealedl from the outer atmosphere. In the present construction there are a pair'of spaced end walls I1 either integral with or secured to the base Ii and preferably of insulating material. Extending between these walls and sealed to them by any suitable means, such for example as a suitable cement, so as to make a tight compartment and enclosing the contacts is a flexible thin wall I8, preferably of insulating material, such, for example, as some of the plastic cellulose or similar materials, and the movable contact I2 is closely adjacent to this wall so that by pressure on the wall it may,

be depressed to force the contact I2 into engagement with the contact Il to close the circuit. The body portion of the contact I2 may be humped or offset upward asshown at I9 toengage the flexible wall I8. The wall I8 may be depressed to operate the movable contact manually by thumb or finger or some operating means may be employed for flexing it to shift the contact. In the arrangement shown there is a toggle lever 20 pivoted at 2| in the spaced arms of a bracket 22 of metal or other suitable material secured to the base I0 by any suitable means, such, for example, as screws 23. This toggle may be of insulating or other material, and it could be so arranged that by movement over the hump I9 it would shift the contact member, but because thiswould mean Wear on the flexible element I8 it is preferred to provide a flexible metal strip 24 at the outer side of the flexible material I8 and provide this with a hump 25 over which the lower end of the toggle slides as `the toggle is rocked on its pivotto depress the strip 24 and` the flexible wall I8 to shift the switch. In Fig. 1 the lever 20 is shown in broken lines with its lower rounded end just moved over the top of the hump 25 to a short distance on the other side so as to depress the contact I2 and retain it in engagement with contactv I I, as shown in dotted lines, to maintain the circuit closed. This strip 24 will take the wear of the toggle and protect the ilexible material I8. The flexible insulating material I8 is sealed to the end walls I1 and to the sides of the'base I0. Also the conductors I8 and I4 are sealed in the4A end walls I1 where they pass through them, and the rivets I5 are sealed at 9 so that the switch contacts are entirely enclosed and sealed from the outer atmosphere. Means is provided for connecting leads or other conductors to the conductors I3 and I4 outside of this sealing chamber, such, forexample, as the binding screws 28. The ilexible wall I8 and the member 24 tend to return to their upper positions by their own resilient action, and this is assisted by the spring or resilient action of the contact I2.

In the form shown in' Figs. 3 and 4, instead of using the flexible wall I8 of insulating material this may be a thin flexible wall 21 of metal sealed to the end walls I1 and the base member to seal the contacts from the outer atmosphere. However, as this is a metal member and therefore an electrical conductor, the contact I2 does not engage it directly, but an insulating element 28 is mounted at the inner side of the flexible wall 21 and between it and the conductor I2. This may be secured on the wall 21 or vseparately mounted as to move with it, or it could be secured to the contact I2. The same means could carrying movable contacts 48 andy 44 yto engage the contacts 49 and 4I. It so happens that in this particular"construction the contact 4l is merely a stop or abutment to maintain the movable member 42 in the open or `circuit breaking position. Member 42 is mounted to rock on a support 45 mounted on the lower wall of the chamber 39 by any suitable means, such as a rivet 45 molded inthe material of the body, and passing through and riveted over the base portion 41 of the member 45 and forming an elecbe used for ilexing thewall 21 to shift the movable contact as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, or it could be shifted by pressure from the thumb or iinger. However, an arrangement isv shown by which it may be shifted by a push-button 29 preferably of insulating material having an enlarged head 30 resting on top of the wall 21 and the reduced portion guided in an opening in a yoke 3| of metal or other suitable material secured to the base Ill. Resilient action of the spring contact I 2 and wall 28 tends to/mbve this wall and the push-button to an upper position when pressure on it is released. The conductors I3 and I4 are sealed in the walls I1, and the ilexible wall 21 is sealed to the end walls I1 in the base I0 by any suitable sealing means such, for example, as a suitable cement to wholly seal the contacts from the outer atmosphere, the same as in Figs. 1 and 2. f In Figs. 5 and 6 is shown a similar constructie in which the flexible thin wall of insulating material I8 may be operated on directly by a thumb or finger to operate the movable switch mem ber, or 'it may be operated by a push-button 29 the same as in Figs. 3 and 4. This flexible wall of insulating material is sealed to the end walls trical connection between this member and an outsidee member, such as the bracket 48 vto which a leadwire may be connected by any suitable means, such as a binding screw 49. The contact 49 is connected with a similar bracket 50 through a similar conducting rivet 5I molded in the body member, and thus the chamber 39 may be sealed from the outside atmosphere except for the open side of the body which is sealed by a separate member, as will be later described. As previously indicated, the movable contact 42 is mounted to rock on the supporting member 45. For this purpose the side walls of the member are each provided with inwardly extending pivot lugs 52,A

and the member 42 is provided with downwardly extending side flanges 59 each provided with a notch 54 to seat over the lugs 52, permitting the member 42 to rock on these lugs, and these lugs and the notches cooperate to hold the member 42 in position on the support 45.

The open side of the chamber 39 is sealed by a flexible insulating member r comprising ilexible sheet material clamped between theplate 35 and the free edges of the body 34 entirely around the periphery thereof. This may be a sheet of suitable rubber or vplastic material, and

` is preferably of electrical insulating material. It

I1 and the base III the same as in Figs. 1 and 2,v

base as indicated at 32 to cover the lower portion of Vthe base and to seal and insulate the rivets 33 used for mounting the conductors I3 and I4 on the base. These conductors are sealed in the walls I1 the same as in the other forms.

In Figs. '1, 8 and 9 is shown how this invention may be applied ,to a toggle type of switch. It comprises a body 34 iof insulating material, preferably of a suitable molded plastic, open at one side, which may be closed by the plate 35 secured by any suitable means such as the screws 36. This plate mayt be a met-al member and includes screws 31 on overhanging ears 38 for mounting the device in an outlet box or other suitable support. 'Ihe body encloses a chamber 39 in which thel switch contacts are mounted comprising stationary contacts 48 and 4I and a rocking member 42 of conducting inguinal is dished at the center so as to rest on top of the member 42, and this member 42 is operated through this flexible sealing member in a manner similar to the forms previously described. In this case, however, a roller 56 runs back and forth over the top of the member 42 but on the opposite side of the flexible member 55, so that the seal of the chamber 39 enclosing the switch contacts is maintained. In order to reduce wear on the flexible member 55, a thin strip of sheet metal 51 may be located between the roller 55 vand the flexible material 55.

The roller 56 is operated back and forth to provide a sort of toggle action with relation to the movable contact member 42 through an operating handle 58 pivoted on laterally extending pivot lugs 59 seated in recesses 60 opening outwardly from the bottom of the piate ss. This f handle enclose's a longitudinal recess 6I in which the non-circular shank 52 of the mounting member83 for the roller 58 may slide longitudinally, and a' coil spring 64 is mounted between the inner end of the shank 62 and the inner end lof the recess 5I, tending to force the member outwardly or downwardly to yieldingly retain the' roller 55 against the flexible member 55 and the movable contact 42. It will be understood that as the handle 58 is shifted back a'nd for-th,

ment with the member Il and the contact ll spaced or separated from the contact 40 to open the circuit, depending on which side ofthe line between the pivots 59 and 62 the roller 6B ls located.

It will be seen that as the handle is swung from either of its extreme lateral positions toward a position in alignmentbetween the pivots 50 and 62, the distance from the pivot 69 to the roller will be shortened, causing the member 63 to be pushed upwardly and compress the spring 64, which as the roller passes by the line between the pivots 59 and 52 will act to push the member 63 outwardly, imparting a quick movement to the rest of' the lever movement, quickly rocking the switch contact member 42 to the opposite position, causing a quick make and break between the switch contacts. This gives a snap acting toggle action.

In the forms shown in Figs. and 11, the

switch elements are sealed within a tubular member 65 of flexible insulating material. The stationary and movable contacts 66 and 61 respectively are mounted on a member 68 of insulating material by any suitable means, such as the rivets 69. The movable contact 61 may be a fiat spring strip normally spaced above the contact 66 by its spring or resilient action to open the circuit. The lead wires 10 and 1l may be connected to the contacts 66 and 61 respectively by any suitable means, such as soldering, and these leads pass through the opposite ends of the flexible tubular member 65 to the enclosed chamber 12 in which the contacts are mounted, and the chamber may be sealed by clamping rings 13 em- .bracing the opposite end portions of the flexible tube to clamp it' about the leads 10 and 1|, or it may be sealed by any other suitable means. The contact 61 may be shifted to engage the contactI 66 by pressing with the thumb and nger on opposite sides of the tube 65 at about the plane of the line H-II, to thus close the circuitl or, if the tube is resting on a support of some kind, by merely depressing the upper wall of the tubular member at about the point 14 to press the contact 61 into engagement with the contact 6B. When the pressure ls released the spring or resilient action of the contact 61 will shift it away from contact 66 opening the circuit. This makes a temporarily closed switch which may .be used for signalling or where a circuit is to be closed only temporarily and held by the operator, as in use similar to flashlights and the like.

It will be understood from the above that the switch contacts are entirely enclosed and sealed from the outer atmosphere and they are also insulated. They may be enclosed by flexible insulating walls or walls which have at least a flexible portion. (It is preferred that the walls be of insulating material, but this is not necessary y as indicated. If the flexible enclosing wall is of transparent material, the contacts are easily inspected without breaking down the switch. A movable contact is operated through the flexible wall portion and by shifting this wall portion, and the contacts are also preferably separate from this flexible sealing and enclosing means. This makes a very simple and effective construction which effectively seals the contacts from the outer atmosphere and so protects them from corrosion or injury from atmospheric conditions. It also seals vthe contacts so that there is no danger of igniting gasesr or surrounding elements by arcinfz of' the contacts, making the switch flreproof. It will also be evident that it is of very simple construction, involving a minimum number of parts,

, so that there is very little danger of its getting out of order and may be operated indefinitely.

I-laving thus set forth the nature of my invention, what I claim is:

1. An electrical switch comprising a body member forming a chamber open at one side, switch contacts insaid chamber one of whichis movable to and from the other, means for connecting lead wires with said contacts, a sheet of flexible material closing the open/ side of said chamber, a support outside said flexible material, an operating lever pivoted on said support, and a spring acting'toggle means betweensald lever and said flexible material adapted on swinging of the lever through a central position to operatethe movable switch member through the flexible material with a snap action.

2. An electrical switch comprising a body member provided with a chamber open at one side, switch contacts in said chamber including a stationary contact and a movable contact mounted on a member pivotally mounted for rocking movements, a member of flexible material closing the open side of said chamber and extending closely adjacent the rocking member, a support .outside the flexible member, an operating lever plvotally i mounted on the support, and means yieldably mounted on the lever to run .back and forth on the flexible and rocking members as4 the lever is swung through an intermediate position to rock the rocking member in opposite directions.

3. An electrical switch comprising a body member provided with a chamber open' at one side, cooperating stationary and movable contacts Ain the chamber, a switch member carrying the movable contact and mounted for rocking movements, a flexible member closing the open side of the chamber and extending adjacent said rocking member, al support closing the open 'side of the chamber outside said flexible member, an operating lever pivoted in said support and carryingr a roller running on the flexible and rocking members to swing said rocking member in opposite directions, and means mounting said roller on the lever permitting it to yield longitudinally as the lever is swung through an intermediate position, and a spring tending to shift the roller in the opposite direction tov give a quick snap action as it passes by said intermediate position.

4. An electrical switch comprisingas a unitary structure an insulating base, metal contacts mounted on the base one of which is movable toward and from the other, insulating means forming a sealed chamber enclosing and sealing the contacts from the outer atmosphere including a flexible Wall portion adapted to be moved to shift said contact, means mounting the contacts in the sealed `chamber independently of the flexible wall, a metal strip on the outer side of said flexible portion, means engaging said strip to flex said wall and shift the movable contact, and conductors connected with the contacts.

5. An electrical switch comprising as a. unlon and outside' the walls for moving said flexible ing means mounted on the Walls outside the chamber for flexing the flexible vportion and operating through it to shift the movable contact, and means for connecting conductors to the' said contacts.

7. An electrical switch'comprising 'a unitary structure including separable metal contacts at least one of which is movable toward and from the other, walls forming a sealed chamber enclosing and sealing the contacts from the outer atmosphere including a exible portion adjacent the movable contact, means mounting the contacts on the walls in the sealed chamber independently of the flexible wall, movable operating means mounted on the walls outside the chamber and operableto ex the flexible portion for shifting the movable contact through said ilexible portion, and means for connecting conductors to the said contacts.

8. An electrical switch comprising separable metal contacts at least one of which is a resilient spring contact .movable toward and from the other, walls forming a sealed chamber enclosing and sealing the contacts fromthe outer atmosphere including a iiexible portion adjacent the movable contact and adapted to permit shifting.

of said contact through movement of .said flexible portion, means mounting the contacts on the walls in the sealed chamber independently of the flexible wall, movable operable means mounted on the walls outside said chamber for flexing said flexible portion and operating through it to shift the movable contact, and means outside said walls for connecting conductors with the contacts.

9. An electrical switch comprising an insulating base, cooperating metal contacts mounted on the base including a contact movable toward and from the other, walls secured to the base forming a closed chamber sealing the contacts from the outer atmosphere and including a exlble portion adapted by flexing thereof to shift the movable contact, said contacts being mounted independently of said flexible wall, a support outside the chamber connected with thel walls, a

movable operating means mounted in the support for flexing said flexible portion` and operatchamber enclosing and sealing the contacts from the outer atmosphere and including a flexible portion adjacent the movable contact, means mounting the contacts on the walls and in the chamber independently of the flexible wall, movable operating means mounted on the walls outside the chamber for ilexing said flexible wall portion to shift the movable contact, and conductors connected with said contacts and extending to the outside of the chamber.

1l. An electrical switch comprising as a unitary structure cooperating metal contacts one of which is movable toward and from the other, insulating means including walls forming a sealed chamber enclosing and sealing the contacts from the outer atmosphere and including a flexible portion adjacent the movable contact adapted to move to shift said contact, meansmounting the conductors in the sealed chamber on the walls independently of the flexible wall, movable operating .means mounted on the walls outside the chamber to flex the flexible portion and shift the movable contact, and conductors connected withsaid contacts.

12. A. unitaryy electric switch structure comprising walls forming a chamber, at least one wall of the chamber being formed by an insulating basev member, switch contacts in said chamber mounted.

on said base member and one of which is movable to and from the other to control a circuit, means for connecting conductor leads to said contacts, another wall of said chamber being formed by a sheet of flexible material, a support outside said flexible material connected with said walls, and an operating means mounted in said support and including means operable through said flexible material by flexing said`material to operate the movable switch member.

13. An electric switch comprising walls forming a chamber, at least one wall of the chamber being formed by a relatively/frigidinsulating member, switch contacts in said chamber mounted Dn said insulating member andone of which is movable to and from the other to control a circuit, means for connecting conductor leads to said contacts, another wall of said chamber being formed by a sheet of flexible material, a relatively rigid support at the outer side of said flexible material, and a manually operable means mounted in said support includingf means mounted to press on the means mounting the contacts in the sealed chamber independently of the exible wall, movable operating means mounted outside the chamber as a part of said structure to shift the flexible wall and through' it to shift the movable contact, and conductors connected with the contacts.

HARVEY HUBBEILA...v

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the iile of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,789,017 Munthesen Jan. 13, 1931 1,952,153 Young Mar. 27, 1934 2,267,203 Krieger 1 Dec. 23, 1941 2,343,060 Horning Feb. 29, 1944 2,357,973 Robbins Sept. 12, 1944 2,367,441 Schwinn Jan. 16, 1945 2,368,926 Jeffrey Feb. 6, 1945 2,377,134 Dietrich May 29, 1945

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1789017 *Nov 29, 1926Jan 13, 1931Niels MunthesenWater-tight electric switch
US1952153 *Dec 24, 1932Mar 27, 1934Gen ElectricElectric switch
US2267203 *Jul 25, 1941Dec 23, 1941Cutler Hammer IncElectric switch
US2343060 *Sep 25, 1941Feb 29, 1944Gen Motors CorpSwitch
US2357973 *Aug 18, 1942Sep 12, 1944Cutler Hammer IncLiquid-tight electric switch
US2367441 *Aug 6, 1941Jan 16, 1945Frank W SchwinnSealed switch
US2368926 *Sep 29, 1941Feb 6, 1945M L Jeffrey CorpSubmergible switch
US2377134 *Dec 30, 1943May 29, 1945Arrow Hart & Hegeman ElectricTilt-type lever-operated switch
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2554728 *Oct 22, 1948May 29, 1951Barber James AElectrical switch for animal traps
US2578494 *May 27, 1949Dec 11, 1951Shaw Wiggins HarryElectric switch
US2790859 *Aug 23, 1954Apr 30, 1957Hung-Tu TsengPush button three way switch
US2959713 *Nov 21, 1955Nov 8, 1960Minnesota Mining & MfgCircuit controlling device
US2962571 *Jun 27, 1958Nov 29, 1960Allied Control CoElectric switch
US3050605 *Mar 23, 1961Aug 21, 1962Abraham PollakSwitch actuating mechanism for submersible sump pumps
US3133997 *Sep 29, 1961May 19, 1964Sanford GreeneFluid-pressure actuated switch
US3172972 *May 2, 1963Mar 9, 1965Arrow Hart & Hegeman ElectricSnap-action electrical switch with contact dampening means
US3472983 *Oct 16, 1967Oct 14, 1969Dominion Electric CorpSealed switch device
US3519776 *Dec 29, 1967Jul 7, 1970Slater Electric IncElectrical switch of the toggle type with the toggle also serving as the movable contact and supported by a conductive groove
US3879592 *Feb 11, 1974Apr 22, 1975Controls Co Of AmericaSwitch having pivoted u-shaped resilient conductive blade
US4545375 *Jun 10, 1983Oct 8, 1985Aspen Laboratories, Inc.Electrosurgical instrument
US4794215 *Sep 26, 1985Dec 27, 1988Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.Push switch sealed against contaminants
US4839483 *Oct 22, 1986Jun 13, 1989Conair CorporationModular watertight switch for use in personal care appliances
DE2951327A1 *Dec 20, 1979Aug 7, 1980Molex IncHermetisch dichte schaltervorrichtung
WO1988003322A1 *Oct 19, 1987May 5, 1988ConairModular watertight switch for use in personal care appliances
Classifications
U.S. Classification200/437, 200/302.3, 200/302.2, 200/302.1
International ClassificationH01H23/06, H01H13/06, H01H13/04, H01H23/00
Cooperative ClassificationH01H13/06, H01H23/06
European ClassificationH01H23/06, H01H13/06