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Publication numberUS2458724 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 11, 1949
Filing dateJan 4, 1946
Priority dateJan 4, 1946
Publication numberUS 2458724 A, US 2458724A, US-A-2458724, US2458724 A, US2458724A
InventorsParissi Anthony J, Parissi Priscilla M
Original AssigneeParissi Anthony J, Parissi Priscilla M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Incandescent lamp socket
US 2458724 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 11, 1949- P. M. PARIssI r11-AL,

INCANDESCENT LAMP SOCKET 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Jan. 4, 1946 lNI/ENTORS n/fwngj Par/'ssi /7 Par/law' R/VEY Jan. 1l, 1949- P. M. PARlssl ETAL INCNDESCENT LAMP SOCKET 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 4, 1946 Patented Jan. 11, 1949 UNITED INCANDESCEN'!` LAIMP SOCKET Priscilla M. Parissi and Anthony J. Parissi, Cohoes, N. Y.

Application January 4, 1946, Serial No. 638,992

Our invention relates to incandescent lamp sockets and particularly to improvements in sockets of this type containing a thermostatic switch adapted alternately to make and break a circuit through a lamp when positioned in said socket.

It has heretofore been proposed to incorporate a thermostatic switch in an incandescent lamp socket but, so far as we are aware, all such sockets are of a special design to accommodate the thermostatic element. It is of course old to incorporate a so-called flasher button in a standard incandescent lamp socket by placing the button in the bottom of the socket and then screwing the lamp into the socket to retain th-e button therein. Our invention, however, relates to a standard metal incandescent lamp socket in which a thermostatic element of the character described above is incorporated in an entirely different way so that it is really a part of the socket. Qur invention also includes a novel type of thermostatic switch which is adapted to be inserted and locked within a standard lamp socket.

The principal objects of our invention are to provide a standard type of incandescent lamp socket containing or combined with a thermostatic element to form a single unitary structure. Another object is to provide a novel form of thermostatic switch which may be readily incorporated in any standard incandescent lamp socket to form a single unitary structure.

With these objects in view our invention includes the novel elements and the combinations and arrangements thereof described below and illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which- Fig. 1 is a plan view of our improved type of thermostatic switch;

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal section through a standard keyless incandescent lamp socket showing the thermostatic switch illustrated in Fig. 1 positioned therein;

Fig. 3 is a sectional view similar to Fig. 2 but taken through a standard socket equipped with a key or switch for turning the lamp oli and on;

Fig. l is a plan View of the thermostatic switch employed in the well known flasher button;

Fig. 5 is a longitudinal section through a standard lamp socket of the type shown in Fig. 3 and having a flasher button with a switch of the type shown in Fig. 4 incorporated therewith;

Fig. 6 is a wiring diagram for the two wire socket shown in Fig. 2;

7 Claims. (Cl. 315-75) Fig. 'I is a wiring diagram for the type of socket shown in Figs. 3 and 5; and

Fig. 8 is a diagram illustrating one application of our invention.

Referring to the drawings- All standard metal incandescent lamp sockets whether of the keyless or of the switch type comprise a generally cylindrical metal shell I which is reduced slightly in diameter in the Zone 2 to form a shoulder upon which an insulating body 3, containing the socket elements, rests. The shell I is provided with an insulating lining fi of paper or the like and it is to be understood that the insulating body 3 which carries contacts 5 and 6 adapted to cooperate with the terminals on the base of an incandescent lamp may be Withdrawn from the shell I in the usual way. At the top, as viewed in Figs. 2, 3 and 5, the shell I is provided with a removable dome-shaped cap or cover 'I which frictionally engages the shell and substantially closes the shell at the top, except for a central passage 8 for the wires leading to the socket. The cap 'I is normally provided with a lining 9 of insulating material, such as paper, which is held in place by three, equi-circumferentially-spaced, struck-in portions l0 (see Figs. 2 and 3).

Our thermostatic switch, in its preferred form, as illustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, comprises a circular disc II of insulating material, such as Bakelite, Mcarta or the like, having a diameter approximating the inside diameter of the cap 1 at the base of the dome-like portion thereof. Although only one notch in the periphery of the disc I I is necessary, I have illustrated three notches I2, each adapted to pass one of the struck-in portions I0 in the cap. Thus, the disc I I may be positioned and secured within the cap I by placing the notches I2 in registration with the struck-in portions I0, pushing the disc into the cap past the projections, and then turning it to lock it in place.

The disc I I forms a base to which the thermostatic switch is attached. This switch comprises a bi-metallic element in the form of a strip I3 which is secured at one side to the disc by an internally-threaded, hollow rivet I4 (see Figs. 2 and 3). This element carries at its free end a contact I5 which, under normal temperature conditions, is slightly spaced from the contact I6 which is secured to a metal strip II riveted or otherwise secured to the disc or base II. Surrounding the bi-metallic element I5 but insulated therefrom is a high resistance heating coil It adapted, when energized, to heat the bi-metallic element and cause it to warp downwardly so that contacts i5 and i6 are brought into engagement. One end lil of the coil i8 is electrically connected to the rivet Iii and the other end 26 is electrically connected to the strip il. Also connected to the strip 'l is a pigail conductor El which adapts the strip il carrying contact I6 to he electrically connected either to one oi the standard terminals 22 on a keyless socket such as shown in Fig. 2 or, in. the case of a switch or key socket, to by-pass the switch and be connected directly or indirectly to the contact 5, as shown in Fig. 3. In order to provide for the passage of the pigtail 2l and other wires from one side of the disc ll to the other, the disc is provided with a central opening 23 which may be provided with oppositely disposed notches 24 into which a screw driver may be inserted for turning the disc to lock it within the l cap.

In the species shown in Fig. 2, a power line 25 is connected to the rivet lll by means of the screw 25, thus, the line 25 is electrically connected not only to the bi-metallic element but also to the end IS of the resistance heating coil. The other end of the resistance heating coil and also the contact I6 are electrically connected to one of the terminals 22 of the socket. The other power line 2T is connected directly to the other terminal 23 of the socket.

The socket shown in Fig. 2 is adapted to hold a lamp which lights or flashes intermittently and, since there is no switch in this socket, the lamp must be controlled from an exterior switch, not shown. When the power lines 25 and 2l are energized, current lirst iiows through the coil I8 and through the filament of the lamp, but since this coil is of high resistance surlicient current cannot pass through the lament of the lamp to cause it to become incandescent. lHowever, the current passing through the coil I8 heats the bimetallic element I3 causing it to warp clownwardly and bring contacts I5 and I 6 into engagement. When this occurs current can ow directly through the bi-metallic element to the terminal 22 and cause the lamp to light. When the lamp is lighted, very littlefcurrent will pass through the coil I8 due to the fact that it has been shunted by the closing of the contacts l5 and i6, where upon, the bi-metallic element will cool, return to its normal position thus breaking the contact between points I5 and IS, and the cycle will then be repeated.

The wiring diagram for the thermostatic switch is shown in Fig. 6.

Referring to Fig. 3, there is here shown a socket in which the lamp may ordinarily be lighted and extinguished in the usual manner by pulling the switch 29 but, by means of an external switch, the thermostatic switch may be put into operation and the switch 29 in the socket by-passed, as will now be described with reference to Fig. '7 as well as Fig. 3.

In Fig. 7, the main power lines are shown at 25 and 21, the three wires coming into the socket are designated as 2l', 3l) and 3l, and the external switch is indicated at 32. The main line 2l is connected by the wire 2 directly to the terminal 28 of the socket. The other main line 25 is connected to the single pole double-throw switch 32, and for normal operation of the lamp in the socket the switch 32 is thrown so that power line 25 is connected to wire 3i] which in turn connects to the terminal 22 in the socket. Thus, by operating the socket switch 29 the lamp shown at 32 in Fig. '7 may be lighted and extinguished, However,

when the switch 32 is thrown so that main line 25 connected with wire 3l, switch 23 is by-passed and it makes no difference whether it is open or closed or, in other words, whether the lamp 33 is extinguished or lighted. Thereafter, assuming the parts at normal temperature to be in the posi tion shown in Figs. 3 and 7, current initially will flow through the heating coil i8, pigtail ZI through the filament of lamp 33 and back to main line 2T. As pointed out above, the high resistance of the coil I8 prevents the passage of sucient Vcurrent to cause the lilarnent of the lamp 33 to become incandescent but the current does heat the bi-metallic element sulciently to bring contacts I5 and I5 into engagement thus shunting the heating coil and causing lamp 33 to light. When the bi-Inetallic element cools, the points l5 and I6 will separate, the lamp will be extinguished, and the cycle will then be repeated.

Referring now to Figs. 4 and 5, we have here illustrated a socket in which a thermostatc switch of the well known asher button type has been incorporated. The working parts of the switch are quite similar to the thermostatic switch illustrated in Fig. 1 except that the base 311 to which the operating parts of the switch are attached is a metal disc having depending projections 35 thereon. The bi-metallic element is shown at 33 and is secured in electrical contact with the disc 30 by means of a rivet 3l. The other contact 33 is carried by the resilient element 39 which is secured to the base 32 by a rivet is@ but is insulated therefrom by the brous material 4I.

Referring now more particularly to Fig. 5, the metallic disc or base 34 ts closely within a metal cup 42 which is covered by a second metal cup 3 but electrically insulated therefrom by the insulating element M.. The two cups are secured in assembled relation with the disc 3d therein by means of the insulating covers t5 and d3. These covers completely enclose the metal portions of the button except in the center of the top where the cup 43 is exposed and in the center of the bottom where the cup [l2 is exposed. One end il? of the heating coil 2S which surrounds the bimetallic element is connected to the element 39 and this element 39 is in electrical contact with the cup 43. The other yend of the heating coil is connected to the loi-metallic element and is thus electrically connected to the metallic disc of base 34 which, in turn, is in electrical contact with the lower cup 42 through the depending portions 35.

The thermostatic switch encased as above described is enclosed within the cap 'I of the standard socket which has a switch 29 the same as the standard socket shown in Fig. 3, A conductor 19, shown in dotted outline in Fig. 5, is analogous to the pigtail shown at 2l' in Fig. 3 and connects the cup 2 with the contact 5 of the socket, thus by-passing the switch.

In Fig. 8, we have shown diagrammatically how a lamp positioned in a socket such as shown in Figs. 3 and 5 may be used both, for example, as a reading lamp, and also as an alarm or signal lamp in connection with a switch which may be actuated by any suitable means when the alarm or signal is to be given. As in Figs. 3 and 5, one of the main power lines 2'! is directly connected to one of the terminals 28 of the Socket. The other main power line r25 may be connected through a single pole, double throw switch 5E with the terminal 22 of the socket and, when the switch 50 is in the position shown in Fig. 8, the

socket switch 29 may be used to light or extinguish the lamp 5I in the usual manner. The wire 3l is connected through the thermostatic switch 53 directly with one of the lamp terminals, such as 5 in Figs. 3 and 5, thus by-passing the switch 29. Running in the other direction, the wire 3| is connected through the manually actuated alarm-off-on switch 52 to the Wire 30 between the socket and the switch 50. Thus, when the alarm switch is in the olf position, the position of the switch 5U is immaterial insofar as the cperation of the light 5| by means of the switch 29 is concerned although it is to be understood that the switch 50, as shown in Fig. 8, is in its normal position when the alarm is not operating.

When it is desired to set the alarm, the switch 52 is merely turned to the alarm-on position. This does not in any way interfere with the operation of the light 5l by means of the switch 29. However, when the switch 50 is moved manually or by any other means as, for example, a clock mechanism, fluid pressure, a liquid level etc., into the position shown by the dotted lines so that a complete circuit is formed from main line through switch 5D, switch 52, thermostatic switch 53 and filament of lamp 5l back to the main power line 2l, an intermittent ashing of the light 5I will occur.

While we have described our invention in its preferred embodiment, it is to be understood that the words which we have used are `Words of description rather than of limitation and that changes within the purview of the appended claims may be made without departing from the true scope and spirit of our invention in its broader aspects.

What we claim is:

l. An incandescent lamp socket comprising an outer shell, a removable cap in engagement with one end of said outer shell and having an opening therein lor the passage of three separate wires, an insulating body retained in said outer shell by said cap and provided with contacts adapted to cooperate with the terminals of an incandescent lamp receivable in said socket and also provided with two wire-receiving terminals electrically connected to said contacts; said terminals :being adapted to receive two of said three wires; a thermostatic switch positioned within said socket vbetween said cap and said insulating body and including a resistance heating coil forming a shunt around said switch for electrically heating said switch to close the same, means electrically connecting one terminal of said switch and one terminal of said coil to one of said contacts, and means electrically connecting the other terminals of said switch and coil, respectively, and adapted to be electrically connected tothe third of said three wires.

2. In an incandescent lamp socket provided with contacts adapted to cooperate with the terminals of an incandescent lamp receivable in said socket, the combination with a thermostatic switch including a resistance heating coil forming a shunt around said switch for heating said switch to close the same, of means electrically connecting one terminal of said switch and one terminal of said coil to one of said contacts, means electrically connecting the other terminal of said switch and the other terminal of said coil together; whereby, when the other of said contacts and said last mentioned means are connected to a source of power an incandescent lamp in said socket will be alternately lighted and extinguished; an outer shell laterally enclosing said socket, and a removable cap in engagement ith and substantially closing one end of said shell with said switch therein and provided with means cooperating with said switch to secure said cap and said switch together independently of said shell.

3. In an incandescent lamp socket provided with contacts adapted to cooperate with the terminals of an incandescent lamp receivable in said socket, the combination with a thermostatic switch, including a resistance heating coil forming shunt around said switch for heat" ig said switch to close the same, of means electrically connecting one terminal of said switch and one terminal of said coil to one of said contacts, means electrically connecting the other terminal of said switch and the other terminal oi said coil together; whereby, when the other of said contacts and said last mentioned means are connected to a source of power an incandescent lamp in said socket will alternately lighted and extinguished; an outer shell laterally enclosing said socket, and a removable cap in engagement with and substantially closing one end ci said shell with said switch therein; said cap being provided with means cooperating with said switch upon relative rotation of said switch and cap to secure the two together.

Ll. ln an incandescent lamp socket provided with contacts adapted to cooperate with the terminals of an incandescent lamp receivable in said socket, the combination with a thermostatic switch including a resistance heating coil forming a shunt around said switch for heating said switch to close the same, of means electrically connecting one terminal of said switch and one terminal of said coil to one of said contacts, means electrically connecting the other terminal of said switch and the other terminal oi said coil together; whereby, when the other ci said contacts and said last mentioned means are connected to a source of power an incandescent lamp in said socket will be alternately lighted and extinguished; an outer shell laterally enclosing said socket, and a removable cap in engagement with and substantially closing one end of said shell with said switch therein; said cap having circumferentially-spaced, struck-in portions, and said switch comprising a circular base of insulating material secured within cap by said struck-in portions.

5. An incandescent lamp socket comprising an outer shell, a removable cap in engagement with one end of said outer shell, a body oi insulating material in said shell having two contacts thereon adapted to cooperate with the terminals on an incandescent lamp receivable in said socket, wire-receiving terminals on said body, means electrically connecting said terminals to said contacts including a manually operable switch in said body adapted to make and break the electrical connection between one of said wire-receiving terminals and one of said contacts; a thermostatic switch in said socket between said body and said cap, including a lai-metallic element, a resistance element for heating said bimetallic element to close said thermostatic switch and forming a shunt around said thermostatic switch; means electrically connecting one terminal of said thermostatic switch and one terminal of said resistance element directly to the contact to which said manually operable switch is connected, and means lor connecting a conductor extending exteriorly of said socket to the other terminal of said thermostatic switch and the other terminal of said resistance element.

6. A unitary incandescent lamp socket comprising the combination with a manually operable switch for lighting and extinguishing a lamp receivable in said socket, of a thermostati'c switch, including a resistance heating element for effecting a closing of said switch, adapted alternately tc make and break a circuit in which it is installed, means electrically connecting said thermostatic switch in series with said lamp and bypassing said manually operable switch, two terminals adapted to connect said socket and said manually operable switch in series with a lighting circuit, a third terminal connected to said thermostatic switch and adapted, with one of said other terminals to connect said thermostatic switch and said socket in series with a lighting circuit, and an exterior shell enclosing the whole to form a unitary structure.

7. The combination with an incandescent lamp socket provided with two terminals adapted to be connected tc wires leading from said socket to a source of power, and a manually operable switch for lighting and extinguishing an incandescent lamp when positioned in said socket and said terminals are so connected, oi means, including a therrncstatic switch adapted alternately to make and break an electric circuit in which it is connected, forming a shunt circuit around said manually operable switch and provided with a REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 681,992 Slusser Sept. 3, 1901 1,088,914 Marks et al Mar. 3, 1914 1,527,746 Miller et al. Feb. 24, 1925 1,683,992 Schoenberg et al. Sept. 11, 1928 1,755,564 Scheonlberg et al. Apr. 22, 1930 1,795,740 Shoenberg Mar. 10, 1931 1,854,842 Huppert Apr. 19, 1932 2,209,808 Bryant et al. July 30, 1940 2,235,360 Davis, Jr Mar. 18, 1941 2,266,468 Mac Donald Dec. 16, 1941 2,278,837 De Castro` Apr. 7, 1942 2,295,202 Davis Sept. 8, 1942

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US681992 *Apr 15, 1901Sep 3, 1901Clyde SlusserFlasher for electric lamps.
US1088914 *Mar 13, 1913Mar 3, 1914William C HowlandIncandescent-lamp socket.
US1527746 *Nov 14, 1923Feb 24, 1925Elmer SmithMetallic container
US1683992 *May 24, 1926Sep 11, 1928ShoenbergCircuit interrupter and socket
US1755564 *Apr 23, 1927Apr 22, 1930ShoenbergCircuit-controlling device
US1795740 *Oct 12, 1926Mar 10, 1931ShoenbergFlashing lamp
US1854842 *Mar 16, 1929Apr 19, 1932William HuppertElectric plug
US2209808 *Oct 13, 1938Jul 30, 1940Gen ElectricLamp socket
US2235360 *May 4, 1940Mar 18, 1941Davis Jr George BThermostatic flasher lamp
US2266468 *Mar 31, 1939Dec 16, 1941Alan Macdonald RoderickElectric switch
US2278837 *Oct 31, 1940Apr 7, 1942De Castro AdolpheIncandescent lamp
US2295202 *Jan 23, 1940Sep 8, 1942Davis Jr George BThermostatic flasher
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4131868 *Mar 7, 1977Dec 26, 1978Gte Sylvania IncorporatedIncandescent lamp socket having overtemperature protector
US4314223 *Dec 11, 1980Feb 2, 1982Mcgraw-Edison CompanyThermal protective device for lighting fixtures
US4396898 *Mar 26, 1982Aug 2, 1983Gte Products CorporationLampholder having thermal protector
US4751623 *Oct 27, 1986Jun 14, 1988Novo Products, Inc.Heat deactivated illumination device
Classifications
U.S. Classification337/92, 337/102, 337/113
International ClassificationH01R33/00, H01R33/95
Cooperative ClassificationH01R33/95
European ClassificationH01R33/95