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Publication numberUS2458737 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 11, 1949
Filing dateFeb 26, 1947
Priority dateFeb 26, 1947
Publication numberUS 2458737 A, US 2458737A, US-A-2458737, US2458737 A, US2458737A
InventorsMortimer B Salkowitz
Original AssigneeMortimer B Salkowitz
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shockproof bottle container
US 2458737 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 11, 1949. Y M. a. sALKowlTz Y SHOCK-PROOF BOTTLE CONTAINER Filed Feb. ze, 1947 '.Avn'A'A'A'Q'AYAYAYeYAi A'rToRNEYS Patented Jan. l1, i949 UNITED. STATES PATENT, oFFlcE sHocKPRooF BoTTLE CONTAINER Mortimer B. Salkowitz, Brooklyn, N. Y.

Application February 26, 1947, Serial No. 731,002

3 Claims.

The present invention is concerned with a transportation package for an individual bottle.

It is among the objects of the invention to provide a transportation container of the above type which shall be substantially entirely of paper stock and which shall be substantially shockproof by affording protection to the contents against breakage under the most severe impact to which such packages are likely to be subjected in rough handling during transportation, and which shall be of relatively low cost and attractive appearance.

In the accompanying drawings in which is shown one of various possible embodiments of the several features of the invention,

Fig. 1 is a view in longitudinal cross section through the complete package,

Fig. 2 is a dropped perspective view of the component elements of the container on a smaller scale, and

Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary detail sectional View.

Referring now to the drawings, the protective container comprises an outer cylindrical or tubular casing or box ||l which outer casing or box consists of a base and a tubular cover |'2. Said elements of the outer casing are telescoped over a cushioning liner I3, the lower rim of the latter abutting the base and the rims of the base and cover abutting in the closed package, as shown.

The base and the cover are preferably of identical construction, except that the cover is desirably somewhat shorter than the base, as shown. The base comprises a tubular Wall of relatively stili paper tube stock of conventional type. Its end wall is preferably a disc I4 of sheet metal crimped as at |5 at its periphery about the lower rim of the base. For added stiffness, the outer rim I5 of the metal end wall is crimped against the outer wall of a cup formation I6 of said metal cup, thereby to compress the lower rim of the paper stock base therebetween.

The cushioning liner is preferably of composite construction in that it comprises a pair of paper stock tubes of the same type as those of the outer casing, though desirably of greater thickness and greater stiffness. The outer diameter of the inner tube I1 is smaller than the inner diameter of the outer tube I8 of the liner to define an annular space therebetween in which is lodged a sheet I9 of corrugated paper board completely encompassing the inner tube I1. The height of the cushioning liner is preferably somewhat less than the combined height of the base I I and cover I2 of the casing, as shown. Desirably the elements of the composite liner are adhesively connected together and the liner is also adhesively connected to the base While the cover |'2 is removably telescoped over the portion of the cushioning liner I3 that protrudes beyond the rim of the base II.

Cushioning means are preferably provided against the sheet metal end Walls of both the base and the cover. Each cushioning means preferablyfcomprises a stack of discs 20 of corrugated paper board, each stack preferably lodged in a paper stock cup 2|, the face of which is at the inside of the casing, while the rim 22 thereof is frictionally interposed between the rims of the corrugated discs 2D and the inner wall of the base and the cover I2 respectively. If desired the cushioning discs 20 or the cup 2| or both may also be cemented or glued in place within the base and cover respectively. The liner I3 as shown, engages the peripheral area of cushion cup 2| in the base The upper end of liner I3 may engage cushion cup 2| of the cover |2, but in the embodiment shown, it ends below said cushion cup and supports a bottle neck holder 23 spaced from the cover end wall. The bottle neck holder preferably comprises a shallow disc 23 of paper stock, centrally perforated at 24 for accommodating the neck of the enclosed bottle B and having a rim 25 snugly fitted over and embracing the inner tube Il of the protective liner. The corrugated paper board element |`9 of the liner affords space, as shown, to accommodate rim 25 of the bottle neck holder, and to this end said corrugated intermediate liner member may be cor-Y respondingly shorter than the inner liner tube I1. v

Thus it will be seen that the entire container is made of conventional paper tube stock, of paper stock cups, of corrugated paper board, and of two sheet metal end discs. The container is therefore of relatively inexpensive material and it is obviously easily assembled.

In use the packaged bottle B, usually a bottle of liquor, is adequately cushioned at its ends by the end cushions 2|] and at its sides is securely encompassed by the cushioning liner I3 and the outer casing I0. The sheet metal end walls I6 stiffen the package materially against collapse or iniury resulting from edgewise impact While the side Wall structure I0, Il, I1, IB, I9 affords adequate stiffening and cushioning against lateral impact or pressure.' The package of the present invention with its contained liquor has been subjected to much more severe tests than those encountered in transportation and has in every case aiorded complete protection to its bottle contents. In fact bottles packaged in the container above described, when dropped from a height of 20 feet upon a concrete floor, re mained intact, whether the impact was taken upright, on the side or on the end edge of the container.

As many changes could be made in the above construction and many apparently widely different embodiments of this invention could be made without departing from the scope of the claims, it is intendedthat all matter contained in the above description or shown in theaccompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Having thus described my invention what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A shock-proof individual shipping container for bottled goods comprising an outer casing of conventional stiff paper tube stock, including a base having an end wall of sheet metal crimped thereto, a composite protective liner secured within said base, said liner comprising two tubes of conventional stii paper tube stock defining an annular space therebetween, corrugated paper board in said space and encompassing the inner tube, said liner protruding substantially beyond the rim of the base, said casing including a cover of construction similar to that of the base and removably telescoped over the protruding part of the liner for rim to rim abutment against the base, and corrugated board cushions retained by and lodged against the inner faces of the respective sheet metal end walls of the base and the cover, the inner face of the base cushion being abutted by the end of the liner, each of said end cushions comprising a stack of discs of corrugated paper board and a paper stock cup with its face exposed to the interior and its rim snugly intervening between the rims of the respective stacks of cardboard discs and the inner wall of the base and cover respectively.

2. A shock proof individual shipping container for bottled goods comprising an outer casing of stiff paper tube stock having a base with an end wall of sheet metal crimped thereto, a composite protective liner secured within said base, said liner comprising two tubes of stiff paper tube `tock defining an annular space therebetween,

4 corrugated paper board in said space and encompassing the inner tube, said liner protruding substantially beyond the rim of the base, a cover of construction similar to that of the base and removably telescoped over vthe protruding part of the liner for rim to rim abutment against the base, corrugated board cushions against the respective sheet metal end walls of the base and the cover, each o f said end cushions comprising a stack of discs of corrugated paper board and a paper stock cup with its face exposed to the interior and its rim snugly intervening between the rims of the respective stacks of cardboard discs and the inner wall of the base and cover respectively, and a bottle neck protector comprising a paper stool:` cup centrally perforated having a rim snugly encompassing the end of the inner tube of the protective liner, the corrugated paper vboard element of the liner being somewhat shorter than the vinner tube to aiord space for accommodating the rim of said cup.

3. A safety container for bottles or the like comprising a composite tubular liner sleeve including an outer tube of paper stock, an inner tube of paper stock, an interspacer of corrugated paperboard, the upperedge of which is below the upper edges of the outer and inner tubes, an outer casing comprising a base encompassing the lower part of the liner and secured thereto, a shallow centrally perforated cup for accommodating a bottle neck, removably telescoped at its rim over the inner wall of the liner and accommodated in the space above the upper edge of the interspacer, a cover removably telescoped over the upper part of said liner, said base and said cover each having a sheet metal disc end wall crimped thereto and cushioning discs against the respective end walls.

MORTIMER. B. SALKOWITZ.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number

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US1611575 *Apr 9, 1925Dec 21, 1926Passaic Metal Ware CompanyContainer
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2564948 *Jan 21, 1949Aug 21, 1951Gaylord Container CorpLined multiple-blank master shipping carton
US2573428 *Dec 27, 1948Oct 30, 1951Greif Bros Cooperage CorpCarboy container
US2653708 *Apr 26, 1949Sep 29, 1953Owens Illinois Glass CoCarton and packing cell
US2654469 *Jul 29, 1948Oct 6, 1953Lever Brothers LtdShipping and display carton
US2741414 *Feb 2, 1951Apr 10, 1956Nottage Paul HCake-tray or the like
US2756105 *Feb 9, 1953Jul 24, 1956American Can CoProtective shatterproof outer container for bottle
US2757790 *Apr 6, 1953Aug 7, 1956Anthony CapizziReceptacles
US2868428 *Jun 1, 1955Jan 13, 1959Continental Can CoBottle shipping container with internal yieldable supports
US3257063 *Jun 18, 1963Jun 21, 1966Connelly Containers IncParticulate materials container
US3295745 *Aug 9, 1965Jan 3, 1967Willibald WinterContainer
US3415358 *Dec 29, 1966Dec 10, 1968Hoerner Waldorf CorpBottle packages
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Classifications
U.S. Classification229/90, 206/446, 229/122.34, 229/5.5, 206/594, 215/12.1, 229/122.33, 229/939
International ClassificationB65D77/04
Cooperative ClassificationY10S229/939, B65D77/0486
European ClassificationB65D77/04F1