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Publication numberUS2459802 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 25, 1949
Filing dateNov 6, 1944
Priority dateNov 6, 1944
Publication numberUS 2459802 A, US 2459802A, US-A-2459802, US2459802 A, US2459802A
InventorsWalter L Fleisher
Original AssigneeWalter L Fleisher
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air-conditioning apparatus
US 2459802 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 25,` 1949. w. l... 'FLEISHER 2,459,802

AIR-CONDITIONIG APPARATUS 4 Filed Nov., 6, l944 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR Patented Jan. 25, 1949 UN [TED S TAT ES`I PAT-"E O F FICE 2,459,802 AIR-CONDITIONING APPARATUS Walter L. Fleisher, New City, N. Y. Application November 6, 19.44 Serial. No.. 562,190

1 This invention relates to air-conditioning apparatus and more. especially to capillary cells of thetype-illustrated in applicants U. S. Patent No.

In commercial embodiments of the capillary cel-I'i-llustrated in said Patent No. 2,139,675, the layer of transversely arranged glass 'fibers at the entrance end of the cell is arranged on the inner side ofk the protective screen rather than on the outer side. as shown in the patent. Rough handling, carelessness in shipping, hosing with steam or water or drastic. cleaning all have a tendency to break down the structure of the commercialized. capillary cell. The 'main diiiiculty arises from movement of the capill'arybers awayfroin the sides or thecasing allowing air and Water to by-pass the contact'ingstrands or from movement of the capillary fibers toward the side of .the casing creating voids in the center section of the cell. While the transverse layers ofcapillary iibersat the entrance to and exit from the cell tend to maintain uniform spacing of the fibers byV opposing the above referred-to movementof the fibers, such layers are so thin that the points of the glass strands projecting through the topand bottom layer are not held eiciently due more particularly to the top layer sagging in the middle. Also, cleaning of fluff or lint or the like collected onthe outer surface of the transverse layers often resulted in breakage of .the ends of the longitudinal strands, thereby destroying whatever support the transverse layer might have given.

An -object of this invention is a capillary cell `of the type above discussed which overcomesthe disadvantages above referred to and provides efcient stabilization ofthe-capillary threads not only when the glass fibers are of their initial length but .also in the event that they become materially shorter than original-ly for any reason.

A further object is a capillary cell of the type above referred to of such arrangement that lint and the like collected at the entrance end of the cell may be removed therefrom with little or no damage to the capillary threads.

According to this invention, the capillary cell is provided with a stabilizing screen at its entrance as well as at its exit. Each screen is spaced inwardly from an extremity of the cell casing and each aperture of a screen receives a small group of capillary threads. These screens effect proper spacing of the main capillary threads and retain the spacing uniform throughout the life of the cell. Means are provided whereby the screen may be adjusted inwardly to compensate *rangedv between thetwo flanges IfI.

4 Claims. (Cl. 18S-45)l for any ,reduction in the, length of the fibers which may develop from use of the cell or cleaning thereof. The screenat the entrance end also servesv to collect lint land ui and byk removal of the screen; the ycollected material may also be re,- movecl without damage to the ends of the capillary fibers.

Other objects, novelfeatures and advantages of 'this invention will become apparent from the following specification and accompanying drawings, wherein :j

Fig.`1 is a fragmentary, perspective View,` parltially broken away, of va capillary cell embodying the invention;v

Fig. 2, is a perspective view on a, smaller scale of the coriiplete,l cell;V Fig. Sis a` fragmentary, vertical section or the cell,A and l f Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 2. illustrating a modication.

As. shown in Fig. i,they capillary cell is contained within a-basketor casing III having openings atits upper and lowerextremities to provide for the passage of air and liquid through vthe basket. The casi-ng. H) is-provided with inwarclly directedanges I I lateacli extremity and a coarse grid I2 engagesthe outer surface of each flange II. A frame Ii3-:ts `over each extremity ofthe casing I0 to retain'the grid I2.in engagement with the ange I I and the frame I3 ris held in place by frictiona1 engagementV with the casing llly or by any suitable fastening means.

A mass or body of oriented capillary threads I4 such,4 forl example, as;v glass-bers, is arranged in the casing lll with` thev rlbers runningparallel to the side walls of the casing and the ends of the capillary threads at v'each extremity of the casing extendingbeyond the plane of the ilange H 'except for those capillary threads which are ar- Lacings l5 extend throughythe capillarythreadsbetween the grids I2 in the manner set forth in applicants U. S. Patent No. 2,139,675.

A wire mesh screen I6 engages the inner surface of each ilange I I and is held in place by any suitable means, (not shown). Each aperture of each screen I6 receives a small group of capillary threads I4, the ends of which project beyond the outer surface of the screen I6 suiciently for the screen I6 to have a stabilizing eil'ect on the fibers. Adjacent the inner surface of each screen I6 is arranged a layer of capillary threads I1 similar to the threads Ill, the threads I'1 being arranged in aplane at right angles to the threads Il.

The arrangement just described and illustrated inFigs. 1 to 3 is the arrangement embodied in a new capillary cell. The arrangement illustrated in Fig. 4 and subsequently to be described is the arrangement embodied in a used capillary cell in which the length of the threads I4 has been reduced by breakage of the ends incident to the use and cleaning of the cell.

The structure of Fig. 4 is the same as that of Fig. 3 except forthe fact that the entrance screen I6 is spacedinwardly from the flange I I an-d corresponding layer of capillary threads I'I is moved inwardly correspondingly. A bracket I8 mounted on the flange I I is suitably attached to the screen I6 and spaces said screen inwardly from the flange II.

For commercial considerations, the cell is so constructed that the casing I is square in crosssection and measures 20" on each side with the cell being from 8 to 9 deep. A 2" spacing has been found satisfactory for the intersecting members of. the grid I2 and in the cell structure herein disclosed the screen I6 preferably is of 1A spacing. The screen I6 of deflniteaperture added to the top and bottom thin transverse layers of capillary threads I'1 and thelacings` I5 present a very substantial and easily handled capillary cell in which movement of the capillary threads I4 from their original and correct positionsV is substantially prevented. The apertures, in the screen I6 though only 1A" are widely enough separated Y.so that there appears from experimental data to be no increase in the static resistance through the cells. Also, the'screens collect thelint and fluff previouslycollected by the transverse capillary fibers I1 and thus protect the, transverse fibers and reduce the possibility of. `breakage of ends of the fibers I4 in cleaningthe cell. The top ofthe cell can now y)ce brushedvoifY with a ystiff brush either by hand `or"automatically without in any way affecting the main structure of the cell. Another improvement in conjunction with this type ofscreenyis thatif'4 nozzles or sprayers supplying water or other liquids to the cells should cease to function properly and project streams of water rather than sprays` at the face of the cell, the screen I6 will break the stream into smaller parts and no thick stream of water or liquid can strike the glass bersto boreholes or breakv down the structureof the cell itself. Consequently,y it is possible to use some'water at higher pressures if essential, particularlyA when the cells are used for dehumidifying purposes. In the event that it is necessary to remove the screen I6 at either end for any purpose, it can be cleaned and pressed back on the strands I4 to take up a relatively similar position as before. Since: the cell is of the same construction at either extremity, either v stabilizing screen 'or both can be removed or the cell can be reversed in its position of use if it is found desirable to do so either tov obtain a longer lip or greater operating emciency.

f I claim:

1. A capillary cell designed to have air and water pass through it in a vertical direction and comprising a. tubular casing, a coarse grid at each extremity of said casing, a plurality of vertical capillary threads in said casing substantially parallel with the sides thereof and to the direction of the flow of air and Water through the cell, and a small apertured stabilizing screen adjacent to but spaced inwardly from the upper and lower ends of the casing, each small aperture of said screen receiving the ends of a group of said capillary threads at the top and bottom of the casing and maintaining the threads in a vertical position and in a predetermined relation to the direction of the flow of air and water through the cell and spacing the individual groups of vertical capillary threads from one another.

2. A capillary cell designed to have air and Water pass throughit in a vertical direction and comprising a tubular casing, a coarse grid at each extremity of sai-d casing, a plurality of vertical capillary lthreads in said casing substantially parallel with the sides thereof and to thedirection ofthe flow of air and water through'the cell, a small apertured stabilizing screen adjacent to but spaced inwardlyfrom the upper and lower ends of the casing, eachsmall aperture of said screen receiving the' ends of a group of said capillary threads at the top and bottom of thecasing and maintaining the threads in a vertical position and in a predeterminedrelation to the direction of the flow vof air andwater through the cell and spacing the individual groups of vertical capillary threads from one anotherand means for varying the position of the upper relatively small screen relative tothe top of the casing.

3. A capillary cell according to claim 1, cha-racterized by a transverse layer of capillary threads adjacent the inner surface of each screen.

4. A capillary cell according to claim 2, characterized by a transverse layer of capillary threads adjacent the inner surface of each screen.

WALTER L. FLEISI-IER.

REFERENCES' CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1976491 *Jul 31, 1931Oct 9, 1934John W GottschalkMetallic rope
US2139675 *Aug 15, 1936Dec 13, 1938Walter L FleisherAir conditioning apparatus
US2144681 *Oct 13, 1936Jan 24, 1939Kraissl Jr FrederickOil vapor filter
US2220127 *Aug 3, 1937Nov 5, 1940Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpAir filter
DE456676C *Feb 29, 1928K & Th Moeller G M B HGas- und Luftfilter mit Glasfaeden als Filterstoff
GB285561A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2687781 *Sep 27, 1951Aug 31, 1954Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpFrame for air filters
US3075334 *Dec 18, 1959Jan 29, 1963American Air Filter CoUnit filter assembly
US4015751 *Jul 2, 1975Apr 5, 1977Acf Industries, IncorporatedQuick change fluidizing outlet assembly
US4685944 *Jun 9, 1982Aug 11, 1987Flanders Filters, Inc.High efficiency particulate air filter
Classifications
U.S. Classification55/501, 55/491, 55/519, 55/DIG.310, 55/528
International ClassificationB01D46/10
Cooperative ClassificationB01D46/10, Y10S55/31
European ClassificationB01D46/10