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Publication numberUS2461122 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 8, 1949
Filing dateOct 12, 1944
Priority dateOct 12, 1944
Publication numberUS 2461122 A, US 2461122A, US-A-2461122, US2461122 A, US2461122A
InventorsMcquitty Roy M
Original AssigneeMcquitty Roy M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Aim indicator
US 2461122 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. M. M QUITTY AIM INDICATOR Feb. 8, 1949.

Filed 061;. 12, 1944 EOF m mA TO POINT PF MM '1.

AT 100 Y@ NM INDICATOR LINES 0F SIGHT 9.

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INVENTOR Patented Feb. 8, 1949 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE AIM INDICATOR Roy M. McQuitty, Richmond Heights, Mo, Application October 12, 1944, Serial No. 558,335

points of aim are carefully located at predetermined points distant from the target, so as to guide the archer in shooting at the target.

In arranging to discharge an arrow from a bow an archer may establish a straight line of aim from his eye, through the point of the arrow and thence to an object located on the ground or above the target. This object is known as the "point of aim. Three fundamental conditions determine the general location of a point of aim relative to a target, namely; distance, or range from archer to target-velocity of arrow, and location of arrow relative to archers eye at time arrow is aimed.

Standard rules for competition in archery specify that a given number of arrows be shot from each of several predetermined distances or ranges from the target, and in changing from one predetermined range to that of a shorter or longer range no practice shots are allowed to determine the point of aim for the new range. It is thus very important that the archer have some predetermined means for readily and accurately locating a point of aim while shooting at any of the standard ranges.

As stated above, the location of a point of aim relative to a target is determined by the combination of three factors, namely; the range from archer to target, method of aiming, and the velocity of the arrow. Especial attention is called to the fact that although the predetermined ranges are fixed and definite and method of aiming may be easily duplicated; the velocity of the arrow, even when shot from the same bow, is continually being changed due to the effect of temperature and moisture changes upon the how. The arrow velocity may also be changed due to the archer changing to a different bow or using arrows of lighter or heavier weight. In other words, the factors of variable ranges and methods of aiming when once established remain relatively constant, the factor of arrow velocity will always be variable and must be so considered in any means for locating a point of aim.

may consist of a primary sight to be aimed at the target and a series of adjustable secondary sights, the primary sight and a different one of the secondary sights being'used at each of the several predetermined ranges. The series of secondary sights are correlated in that they are always located in their proper aiming position relative to the primary sight for one and the same. arrow velocity. Means are provided for adjusting said V series of secondary sights to conform to other arrow velocities, each of the secondary sights being simultaneously moved proportional distances relative to the primary sight, said movements conforming with the relative effect of a unit change in arrow velocity at the corresponding ranges from the target.

The above mentioned sights are cooperative in nature in that the combination of the primary sight and any one of the secondary sights, for a 1 corresponding range, may be used to compensate for the effect of arrow velocity when'the above mentioned combination of primary sight and secondary sight are selectively adjusted to an experimentally located point of aim for that range, and; in said adjustment to a known point of aim, all other secondary sights are simultaneously adjusted to conform tothe same arrow velocity and can'thus be used to find the location of points of aim for all other predetermined ranges corresponding to that arrow velocity. In other Fig 1 is a simple diagram illustrating a metho of aiming an arrow. V I

Fig. 2 is another diagram, not drawn to scale,

illustrating the manner in which an aim indicator may be used to sight locations of points of aim relative to targets at predetermined ranges.

' Fig. 3 is a side view of the aim indicator e1 bodying features of the inventionand showing a.

primary sight It and correlated secondary sights, I05, 88, Bil, 5D, 40 and 3E for corresponding ranges. Said sights are properly arranged for one arrow velocity and may conform with the points of tangency of primary sighting line 8 and secondary sighting line 9 with prearranged lines on the surface of an aim indicator sighted as in Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a side view of the aim indicator, the main body of which has been rotated 180 degrees, demonstrating means for selective adjustment of the device for various arrow Velocities and indicating means associated therewith.

Fig. 5 is a tranverse section on the line 5-5 inFig.4, h

Fig. 6 is a-fragmentary cross'sectional view showing 'de'tafls of means for selective adjustment for various arrow velocities also means by which the device may be supported at the end of 'an arrow.

A study of Fig. 1 will show how anarcher may aim the arrow by sighting through a straight'lin'e cf aim extendin from his eye to the point of the arrow and thence to an object I on the ground known as a point of aim. This point of aim I may be carefully located by trial and error to'provide for discharge of the arrow through a A itr'ajectory leading to the center of the target.

The location of the above point of aim i would be suitable only forthe predetermined range,

method 'of aiming and arrow velocity for which it was established.

"Fig.2 is a diagram, not drawn to scale but 'suggestinga me'ansjby which the locations of several points of aim 1, each for a separate predetermined range but all for the same arrow velocity, may be sighted. ..In this diagram there is a primarysighting line 8 extending from the eye of the archer to the center of a target which target may .be located, at different predetermined ranges from the archer. ing'lines '9 extend from 'eye of archer to points of ai'm'i for predetermined ranges of 30, 40, 50, 60, 80 and 100, yards from archer to target. Assuming that all points of aim l are simultaneously'correct for the same arrowvelocity and each point of aim is correct for itscorrespond ing range at" that velocity, then sighting points established on an aim indicator at the points of intersection of line 8 and lines of sight 9, with an aim indicator held as in Fig. 2 could be used to later duplicate the, locationof a point of aim i for any one or all of the standard ranges for that arrow velocity. It would follow that numerous' other arrangements or series of secondary sighting points could be established onv consist of corresponding points on helically formed lines imprinted upon the surface of rod i. The above mentioned ring and helixes when viewed in connection with rod i as in Fig. 3 or sighted as in Fig. 2, appear as a horizontal straight line and sever'alslanting lines respectively; each of the said lines appearing to .end

at points of tangency of lines of sight with the surface of rod l. The apparent ends of the said lines at points of tangency are actuallyusedas";

sights. As rod 1 is sighted as per Fig. 2 and rotated relative to base t, primary sight it remains at a constant elevation relative to base sight Hi, said distances being determined by the relative degree of spiral of the corresponding helixes. The united arrangements of said ring relative to helixes is such that a primary sight iii and secondary sights (80, 88, 60, 50, 40 and 30 are always visible in proper location for sighting points of aim corresponding to one and the same arrow velocity, at the several ranges.

Fig. 4 illustrates an"'aim' indicator in which rod lhas been rotated 180 degrees relative to base 2 the extent of rotation being indicated 'by a scale :3 and reference mark 5. An opening 6 in base 2 is provided to receive the point of the archers arrow which arrow, as per Fig. serves to locate the aim indicator in the proper sighting position. The extremities of range helixes 'lt il, Siljtil, 58, 50 and 3B are shown; also,

Secondary sight- 2 while the'secondary sights simultaneously move through different distances relative to"3 rim'ary be correct. v h h v to be changed; while shooting' at the same range [withthe'same method of aiming, indicated that the united arrangement of said helixes. Primary sight It! and another series of secondary sights H38, 88, 6t, 53, til and 39 are shown which secondary sights have been simultaneously adjusted for a much lower "arrow velocity, said adjustment taking place when rod 1 was rotated 180 degrees relative to base 2. Especial attention is called to "the fact that although the series of secondary sights in Fig. 4 correspond to the same predetermined ranges as in Fig. 3, in the process of adjustment for a lower arrow velocity, all secondary sights have moved upward relative, to primary sight iil the amount of movement for sight i515 beingmuch greater than that of sight 38. This series would locate the 100 yard point of aim above the target as indicated by sight "I00 now being above primary sight Ill.

The primary sight ID is usually ret'aindin a fixed position relative to rod I but maybe moved toward or away 'from' the secondary sights to compensate for any difference in'methods of aiming an arrow between different arches. Above variaticn'in methods of aimin include, variation in distances from archers eye to point of arrow also vertical distance from eye to opposits or reanendof 'arrow' at time of release of arrow when shot. .S uch adjustment of the primary sight will not affect the cooperativefrelation'ship oi'the secondary'sights and when once made for a given 'niethod of 'airning,"becomes permanent. I

A study ofFigfd'will show an opening f6 extending horizontally into bone 2 serving as N a means for afilxing the aim indicator on the end of an arrow" and at degrees to said arrow.

it screw H securedtoro'd [serves as an axisfor rotation of rod I relative to" base -2. A vertical opening E2 in base 2 merely'serves as a port 'for insertion'of screw H. r

"with the foregoing jdetails'infmind the practical application' of my invention "may be demonstrated' by the'followingassumed condition:

and immediately relocates thefpoint 'of aim to a higher elevation, The'next shot at "yards shows the new location of the point of aim to Thef actthat-the'point of'ai'm had the arrow velocity had changed, hence affecting points of aim for all rangesby different amoim'ts.

with the .100 yard point of' aim now relocated ex erimentally the; archerfibefore moving to another range, mayemploy the aim indicator and the known point of aiin'at lqq yards toiindi'cate the changed locations foff points of aim Coriespending" to'other predetermined ranges. This would be accomplished as followsrthe pointof an arrow would be inserted in the opening 6 in base 2' and with the opposite or rear end of arrow held against archers. teeth; aim indicator would be sighted as per Fig. 2 so as to locate primary sight I in line of sight fromeye to center of target at 100 yards whilerod I would be selectively rotated relative to base 2 so as to adjust secondary sight Hill in line of sight from eye to corrected point of aim for 100 yards.

' Since all secondary sights are moved simultaneously so as to conform to the same arrow velocity'thenc'e, in adjusting the aim indicator to the 100 yard point of aim, the sights for all other ranges would beautomatically located so as to conform with the arrow velocity for which the 100 yard point of aim was established. and the archer could then proceed to any other range from the target and determine the proper location of a point of aim for that range by sighting primary sight I!) at the target and at the same time sighting through the corresponding secondary sight to point of intersection of line of sight with the ground or other object.

The archer may frequently find it necessa y to use a difierent bow or a different set of arrows. The archer would, in that case, first test the new combination by experimentally locating a point of aim at one of the closer ranges such as 40 yards. The aim indicator would then be adjusted to the 40 yard point of aim and all other points of aim could thus be determined without laboriously finding said points of aim by trial and error.

Specific ranges of 190, 80, 60, 50, 40 and 30 yards have been mentioned because they conform to a series of popular ranges for archery practice but the invention is not limited to such ranges. In other words, the invention is to be found in a. device having the novel combination and arrangement of cooperative details described by any one of the following claims, and not in the specific distances, etc., selected to aid in explaining the new concept.

However, in this simple form of the invention, all of the sights are exposed for sighting in a sighting zone at one side of the vertical rod l. The user depends upon his view of the primary and secondary sights appearing at an extreme side face of the rod. I. Consequently, rotation of the rod I with relation to the base 2 will change the locations of the spirally iormedsecondary sights in this vertical sighting zone. Such rotation will either raise or lower the actual sighting points of said secondary sights with relation to the primary sight I 0.

After the desired adjustment has been made, the user will notice the scale ii at the bottom of the rod l, and observe its location with respect to the reference mark 5 on the base 2, which serves as an indicating guide for continued use under the adjusted conditions.

I claim:

1. In an instrument for locating points of aim under conditions wherein said points are remote from a target, an aim indicator comprising a sighting device having cooperative sights including a primary sight to be aimed at the target, and a series of secondary sights to be aimed at different points remote from the target, so as to find the points of aim, for difierent arrow velocities, at several predetermined ranges from the target, there being a separate secondary sight for each of said ranges from the target, all of said sights being exposed for sighting in a sighting 16 zone at one side of the sighting devicc,said-secondary sights being at different distances from said primary sightand movable in said sighting zone toward, and away from said primaryv sight, so as to locate any one ,ofthe secondary sights in its aiming position, and indicating means associated with said secondary sights to indicate corresponding aiming positions of the several secondary sights. q

2. In an instrument for locating points of aim under conditions wherein said points are remote from a target, an aim indicator comprising, a sighting device having cooperative sights including a primaryv sight to be aimed at the targetand *a series of secondary sightsto be aimed at different .points remote from the target, so as to find the points of aim, for difierent arrow'velocities, atseveral predetermined ranges from the target,

.there being a separate. secondary sight iorea-ch of said ranges from the target, all of said sights being exposed for sighting. in a sighting zone at one side of. the sighting device, said secondary sights being at different distances fromsaid'pritil mary sight and movable in said sighting zone toward and away from said primary sight, said secondary sights being united with the sighting device and movable simultaneously to locate any one of the secondary sights in its aiming position, and indicating means associated with said secondary sights to indicate corresponding aiming positions of the several secondary sights.

3. In an instrument for locating points of aim under conditions wherein said points are remote from a target, an aim indicator comprising a sighting device having cooperative sights including a primary sight to be aimed at the target and a series of secondary sights to be aimed at points remote from the target, so as to find the points of aim for diiferent arrow velocities at several predetermined ranges from the target, there being a separate secondary sight for each or said ranges from the target, said secondary sights being located at different distances from said primary sight so as to locate the aiming positions of the several secondary sights with relation to said primary sight when one of said secondary sights is selectively adjusted to its aiming position, said secondary sights being in the form of spirals carried by and exposed in a sighting zone at one side of the sighting device, including a relatively steep spiraled helix serving as the sights for points of aim for the range, most remote from the target, and spirals of less pitch for the secondary sights for points of aim nearer to the target.

4. In an instrument for simultaneously indicating locations of several points of aim under conditions wherein said points are remote from a target, an aim indicator comprising a slighting device having a cylindrically shaped surface provided with cooperative sights exposed in a sighting zone at one side of said cylindrically shaped surface, said sights including a primary sight to be aimed at the target and a series of'secondary sights to be aimed at different points remote from the target, so as to find the points of aim for different arrow velocities at several predetermined ranges from the target, there being a separate secondary sight for each of said ranges from the target, said secondary sights being in the form of helically shaped lines carried by said cylindrically shaped surface, said sighting device being rotatable to adjust said secondary sights, and the spirals of said helically shaped lines being varied to simultaneously move the secondary 'sights "different 'rIdistances in esa ld sighti-n'g zone in response tosubh rotation.

5. In aninstrumentfor locating points ofaim --under'-=conditions wherein'said points sare'z-rem'ote i r'oina'target; a sighting device in theform tof=a cylindrical "rod having a. primary sight to be {aimed at the target, and a series'of secondary sights, located atdifferent elevations, to 'be aimed at different points remote from the "targetfall of' said sights being exposed for sighting in a sighting zone at one side of said cylindrical 'rod, 'the' secondary sights being'in the form of varying spirals carried by and exposed "at 'theJperiphery of s'aid cylindrical rod, and movable in response to "rotary movements of said red; so. =as' to vary the locations of -saidsecondary sights in s'aid sighting zone.

" 6. In an instrument for locating points' of aim 1 under conditions wherein said points are remote from a-target, a sighting device in the'form of a 'cylindi'ical rod having a primary sight to be "ai'mewat the target, and a series of secondary -sights, located at difierent elevations,tobe aimed at different points remote from the target; all

L REFERENCES CITED '"Thefollowing'references"are of record 'in' the file bf this patent:

I UNITED. STATES PATENTS Name Date f1, -Moller Aug. 8, 1911 15039969 "Schmid Mar. 10, 191-4 i-$05009 Karnes Apr. 14, 1931

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1000282 *Sep 13, 1910Aug 8, 1911Carl MoellerDistance instrument.
US1089969 *Nov 13, 1912Mar 10, 1914Francis C SchmidMeasuring instrument.
US1801009 *Oct 13, 1926Apr 14, 1931James C KarnesElevation-indicating device for ordnance of the howitzer type
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2667692 *Nov 23, 1951Feb 2, 1954Leafstrand Douglas JBow sight
US4153999 *Nov 18, 1977May 15, 1979Steen Sonny J OArchery bow sighting arrangement and method
US5906054 *Oct 25, 1996May 25, 1999Asher; Lynn EugeneFor establishing a correct weapon position relative to a shooter
US6618949Apr 9, 2002Sep 16, 2003Shawn D. KeenerSystem and method for adjusting sighting pins in an archery sight and determining the velocity of an arrow
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/265
International ClassificationF41G1/467, F41G1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41G1/467
European ClassificationF41G1/467