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Publication numberUS24620 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 5, 1859
Publication numberUS 24620 A, US 24620A, US-A-24620, US24620 A, US24620A
InventorsEpes E. Elleey
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Improvement in water-proof paints
US 24620 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

EPES E. ELLERY AND JOSEPH F. ELLERY, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

IMPROVEMENT IN WATER-PROOF PAINTS.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, EPES E. ELLERY and JOSEPH F. ELLERY, both of the city, county, and State of New York, have invented a certain new and useful Water-Proof Paint; and we do hereby declare that the following is a full and exact description of the materials used in and the process of compounding the same.

The nature of our invention consists in combining the materials hereinafter described, in the proportions set forth, for the purpose of producing a paint to Withstand and resist the effects of wet, moisture, and vapor.

To enable others skilled in the art to compound and produce our water-proof paint, We will proceed to describe its constituent materials and the process by which we combine and compound them.

We take twelve pounds of india-rubber, eitherin its crude form, or refuse or scrap manufactured rubber, and dissolve it by heat in six gallonsoflinseed-oil. We then take twelve pounds of gntta-percha, either in its crude form or refuse scraps that have been manufactured, and dissolve it by heat in twelve gallons of linseed-oil. These articles are then mixed together,and into the mixture thus obtained we put three gallons of shellac varnish, made by dissolving six pounds of gum-shellac in three gallons of alcohol; and the mixture is then thoroughly incorporated by stirring them by mechanical or other means. From two and one-halfto three and one-halfgallons of this mixture, according to the required thickness of the coating, is then mixed with one hundred pounds of coloring-matter, either Spanish brown, ocher, Venetian red, or other materiahaccording to the color required to be produced, by passing the mixture through a paint-mill in the ordinary manner, and the paint is then ready for use. Theindia-rubber in the mixture gives to it a proper elasticity to prevent the paint being injured by the changes of the atmosphere from heat to cold,

and, with the gutta-percha and shellac varnish, forms a coating, when dried upon the surface to which it is applied,whicl1 is completelyim- 'pervious to water and is unaffected by vapor,

moisture, or dampness. The gutta-percha isa well-known non-conductor of heat, and tends to prevent the paint being injured by the changes oftemperature, while the shellac varnish, when the paint is dried, forms a hardened coat which resists the efi'ects of wet and dampness, and which, in combination withthe other ingredients in the composition, loses its liability to crack and break when subjected to changes of temperature. The india-rubber and gutta-percha are dissolved in the linseedoil separately, for the reason that they will not combine together as thoroughly and effectually with the oil when mixed together as when they are dissolved separately, as described, and then mixed together.

This paint is applicable to the covering of all exposed surfaces, but is peculiarly applicable to the covering of exposed iron structures, which are peculiarly liable to be oxidated by wet, vapor, or moisture, as it forms a coating upon such surfaces which effectually resists the effects of changes of temperature and of wet and moisture, and which preserves such surfaces for a longer period than any of the paints in common use.

We do not claim the use of the materials herein described separately, as they have been used before for different purposes.

What we claim as our invention, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-- The composition prepared and composed of the materials, as described, in the propor tions set forth, for the purpose of making water-proof paint.

EPES E. ELLERY. JOSEPH F. ELLERY. Witnesses:

M. HASKELL, GEORGE N. BUOKMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6306416 *Jun 6, 1995Oct 23, 2001The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of AgricultureComposition and apparatus useful for attracting and controlling insect pests
US6316017 *Nov 10, 1993Nov 13, 2001The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of AgricultureComposition and apparatus useful for attracting and controlling insect pests
US20050086076 *Oct 17, 2003Apr 21, 2005Integrated Healthcare Information Services, Inc.System and method for assessing healthcare risks
US20100100395 *Oct 19, 2009Apr 22, 2010Ingenix, Inc.Method for high-risk member identification
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationC08L93/00