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Publication numberUS2463053 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 1, 1949
Filing dateAug 19, 1943
Priority dateAug 19, 1943
Publication numberUS 2463053 A, US 2463053A, US-A-2463053, US2463053 A, US2463053A
InventorsFrank Pritchard
Original AssigneeFrank Pritchard
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf club construction
US 2463053 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 1, 1949. F. PRITCHARD 2,463,053

GOLF CLUB CONSTRUCTION Filed Aug. 19, 1943 2 Shets-Sheet l 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 19. 1943 mw EL;

INVENTOR.

Patented Mar. 1, 1949 gUNITED sTATEs PATENT orifice GOLF CLUB CONSTRUCTION Frank Pritchard, Chicago, Ill.

Application August 19, 1943, Serial No. 499,177

4 Claims. 1 j

This invention relates to golf club constructions, and more particularly to golf club constructions of the type wherein a single tubular metallic shaft is adapted to be selectively and detachably connected to any one of a series of different club heads.

There have been numerous club constructions heretofore proposed (such as for example as shown in the Mears Patent No. 2,051,961, issued August 25, 1936) wherein a shaft may be detachably connected to a golf club head; Such prior constructions have not been found satisfactory due to the nature of the means constituting the detachable connection. Moreover, in constructions wherein a single shaft is adapted to be detachably connected to any one of a series of heads, as disclosed in the Mears patent, some provision must desirably be made for obtaining a shaft of a proper length for use in conjunction with the particular club head selected. In the Mears patent an adjustable handle is employed wherein the handle is adapted to be telescoped on the shaft proper` and releasably secured in position. Such a handle construction, it is believed, would not be found satisfactory for two main reasons. First, the means for securing the handle at an adjusted position on the shaft will not remain suiiiciently stable to preclude turning thereof, relatively to the shaft proper, during the process of driving a ball, and there will'be a tendency of the handle to either telescope inwardly or outwardly with respect to the shaft, due to the forces set up in the club proper during the swinging stroke. Secondly, the handle as proposed in the Mears patent must be adjusted in an empirical manner each time that the shaft is connected to a different club head. This adjustment of the handle in addition to the consuming of time will frequently result in obtaining a shaft of only approximate length-at times it may be adjusted too long and at other times it may be adjusted too short. It is well known that the differences in length of shafts for the various clubs when manufactured as unitary club structures varies quite substantially. As, for example, there is a difference of several inches in length of the shafts of a driver and a niblick. Such differences in lengths of the shafts has long been considered important to the proper and eicient use of the clubs.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide novel and improved means for quickly and easily detachably connecting a tubular metallic shaft to any one of a series of different club heads, and wherein the assembled .club will be i 2 properly balanced, and the connection between the shaft and the head substantial and durable, so as to render the club capable of proper and efficient use in the same manner as a permanent unitary club structure.

Another object is to provide a novel and improved means for detachably connecting ay tubular metallic shaft to any one of a series of different club heads, and wherein the connection serves to reinforce` thetubular shaft and the neck or hosel ofthe head.

A further object is to provide an improved golf club set composed of a series of different club heads having necks or hosels of progessively reduced lengths, adapted to be selectively and detachably` connected to a single shaft to provide a club having a desired head and a shaft of a proper proportionate length.

Still another object is to provide an improved tubular metallic shaft having a suitable fitting integrally united to the lower end thereof, adapted to selectively and detachably engage with a cooperatively formed tting on the upper end of the neck or hosel of' each of a series of different club heads, and wherein the shaft may be fully and properly tempered after attachment of the fitting thereto. i

Other objects and advantages of this invention will be apparent from the following description, taken `in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view of the lower portion of a wood head golf club embodying the present invention.

Figure 2 is an axial sectional view through the lower end of the shaft of the golf club showing the Vposition of parts constituting a threaded tting, prior to final securement to the club.

Figure 3 is an enlarged vertical, axial section of my novel connecting means between the club head and lower end of the shaft, taken substantially as indicated at line 3-3 on Figure 1.

Figure 4 is a fragmentary sectional View of the lower end of the shaft attached to a modified form of threaded tting.

Figure 5 is a side elevational view of a lower portion of an iron head club provided withconnections embodying the present invention.

Figure 6 is an enlarged vertical, axial sectional view through the connection of the shaft and head, taken as indicated at line B--E on Figure 5, showing the relation of the tting to the hosel of the iron head before permanent attachment thereto.

Figure 7 is an axial sectional view, similar to Figure 6, showing a modified form of connection between the shaft and a wood club head, and

Figure 8 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the upper end of the hosel of an iron club head, embodying a modified form of connection.

The present invention contemplates a golf club set comprising a single tubular metallic shaft and a series of different club heads adapted to be selectively `and detachably connected to the shaft. The set of heads may be composed of one or more wood heads and any desired number of iron heads. The hosels or necks of the iron heads are progressively reduced in length; for example, the length of the hQSel-of the midiron head is considerably less than the wood heads and the length of the hosel of the head of the mashie is less than the length of the hosel of the midiron, and the length of the hosel of' the niblick may be practically zero. Thus, by varying thelength of the hosels of the respective iron club heads, it will be possible at all times to obtain a proper proportionate shaft length for the particular iron club head'to which the shaft may be connected. Thus the proper length shaft is obtained without any thought whatsoever on the part of the player and the playerin effect obtains the equivalent of a multiplicity of different` clubs having shafts of proper proportionate lengths. The varying lengths of shafts for the different clubs has long been' considered of substantial importance for the benefit of the majority of players in order to: permit proper and eicient execution of a particular golf stroke.

A complete set of heads may be conveniently stored in a suitable kit, which may be provided with a strap to be thrown over the shoulder of a player, or may be formed as a panel attached to a belt adapted to be secured around the waist of the player. Thus by such a club set construction the weightr and -bulk of the shafts of numero us clubs are entirely eliminated, as well as the major portion of weight which would normally he. inherent in anysuitable golf` bag for carry.- ing the clubs. When the club. heads arev carried in a suitable kit belted to the player, there is no interference whatsoever with thel use of an assembled club in driving or pitching the ball.

Another advantage of such a` construction is that it completely eliminates the necessityv of'y a caddie, and the player may quickly and easily change club heads on the shaft in a few seconds of time while approaching the ball for the next shot orV while judging distances, such club sets will also increase. the speed of play in that itv will not be necessary to stoop or look for av golf bag, or to, wait on a caddie in sup.-

r.lawinethe proper club.`

f In Figures` 1 to` 3 of the drawing, my novel connection is illustrated in conjunction with a shaft I and a wood club head indicated at Ifl. The shaft I0` is of conventional metallic,tubu

lar stock, tapered downwardlyA from the upper The, use of I2a of the plug is a member I4, including an enlarged flange portion I4a, joined to a threaded stud Mb. The plug I2 and member I4 before connection together, are disposed in a relationship as seen in Figure 2 of the drawings. Due, however, to the -butt lWelding operation, some of the metal atr the juncture of the parts being welded, becomes burned away and the parts I2 and I4 finally assume aI dimensional relation- Shfsuch as seen in Figure 3 of the drawings.

After the fitting is welded together and made a permanent part of the lower end of the shaft I0, a longitudinal duct I6 is drilled through the member I4 and plug I2, as clearly seen in Figure 3 of the drawing. The purpose of the duct I6 is to insure proper and uniform tempering of theshaft I 0 after the cooperating fitting has been permanently assembled to the lower end thereof. The provision of the duct I6 permits the quenching oil in the heat-treating operation to flow entirely through the shaft and thereby obtain proper tempering thereof. The heattreating operation simultaneously results in hardening of the threaded stud Mb, the purpose of which will be hereinafter described. After the fitting is thus assembled to the shaft, the external surfaces thereof may be finished in any well-known manner and a suitable hand grip may be. provided on the upper end of the shaft, and a section of plastic, tape, as indicated at Il, is'wound around the lower end of the shaft, and projecting beyond said lower end so as to lap Ehe butt-.welded joint of the plug lI2 and mem- ,er I4.

In a standard wood club head construction, the tubular shaft is. usually made of sufficient length so that its. lower end portion is firmly anchored in place in the head proper. In my construction I utilize a standard lengthA tapered, tubular metallic shaft, and sever the lower portion therefrom, asl indicated at. lua, and anchor the same in a conventional manner in the wood portion of the club head. As. mayV be clearly seen in Figure 3 of the drawing, the tubular portion Illa, which now becomes a part ofthe cluby head, is likewise tapered.

A cooperating fitting 20a of tubular form is tapered internally in correspondence to the shaft, `for a snug wedge t upon the upper end of the tubular member Ia, as seen inv Figure 3 of the drawing, and is spot-.welded in position thereon. The upper e-nd-` ofthe tting 20 is formed with a threaded socket 20a, for cooperative threaded engagement with the stud I4b of the tting carried on the lowerl endj of the shaft l0. The fitting 20., and" particularly the threaded socket portion 20a, is= preferably heat-treatedv so that the connection betweeny the shaft and club head is increased in, strength andv capable ofwithstanding thestresses and strains set up. therein, incident to the club impacting the ball. The hardened threads* ofv` the two cooperating fitting members also insures' longerV life and reduced; wearincident tonumerous operationsf.'V off connecting and disconnecting of the; shaft tothe club heads.

Mounted on the tubtdar member Illa ofA the head, in abutting engagement: With the lower end of thev sleeve fitti-ng 20, are twoferrules 22 and 23; whichmaybe formed of any suitable material, such as plastic, and; which serve to give the club head a neat and attractive;- finishedY appearance. The hoseliofr the woodV head and the portion of the tube ma below,l the; ferrule 23, are provided with a conventionalwinding of thread, as indicated at 2.41 f

vBy virtue of the detachably connectible fittings, the shaft may be quickly and easily connected to and disengaged from the hosel of the wood head, and it may be understood that the threads of the respective stud I4b and socket portion 20a of the ttings are formed left hand for right hand clubs, and right hand for left hand clubs, so that when the ball is impacted by a club, the club head will normally tend to tighten with respect to the shaft.

In Figure 4 of the drawing I have shown a modified form of integral fitting for the lower end of the shaft. In this construction the tting includes a cylindrical shank portion 21 telescoped into the lower end of the tapered tubular shaft indicated at 28,` and spot-welded thereto. The tting also includes an integral circular flange 29, the lower face of which is connected to a de.

pending threaded stud 30, of the same dimensions and form as the tting seen in Figure 2 of the drawing. The fitting is provided with a longitudinal duct, open at both ends, as indicated at 32, which is preferably formed therein after the fitting is spot-welded to the shaft. The purpose of the duct is the same as above described in connection with the construction illustrated in Figure 3 of the drawing.

In Figures 5 and 6 of the drawings, the shaft l is provided with a fitting of the type illustrated in Figure 3 and is shown in connection with an iron club head indicated at 35, which is provided with an upstanding neck or hosel 36, the upper end of which terminates in a flat end, as clearly seen in Figure 6 of the drawing, to which is buttwelded a socket fitting 38 having an internal threaded socket 38a for cooperative engagement with the threaded stud l4b of the lower end of the fitting carried by the shaft l0. When the socket fitting 38 is butt-Welded to the hosel 36,

there is a slight amount of burning away of the metal at the plane of juncture of the two parts, so that `when the socket is finally secured in welded relation to the hosel, it is slightly shortened, as seen in Figure of the drawings.

As above stated, the various iron heads of the entire series have hosel lengths gradually reducing in length as the number of the club increases, or to state it differently, as the face of the club is increased in inclination to a vertical plane. In the use of my novel iitting it has been found that in connection with clubs having greatly inclined faces, such as the niblick, I form the niblick head without a hosel and the socket fitting 38 is welded in proper relation directly to the head'proper. By such variation in the length of the hosels of the iron club heads it is possible that the length of the shaft when used with any of the heads of the entire series, will always be of a proper proportionate length for the particular club head to which it is connected.

The fittings on the lower end of the shaft and on the upper end of thehosels of the respective club heads are preferably formed of high carbon steel so that when subjected to a heat-treating operation, the fittings are hardened and strengthened. This is particularly important in connection with the threaded stud |417 of the fitting on the shaft and the threaded sockets such as indicated at 20a of the fittings 20 for the wood club heads, and the sockets 38a of the fittings 38 secured to the upper end of the hosel of the iron heads, so as to provide a threaded connection wherein the threads will not be easily deformed or injured and which will not be subjected to appreciable wear incident to numerous connections and disconnections of the cooperating fitting members. The iron club heads usually are formed of a mild steel, of low carbon content, and hence to form the upper end of the hosel thereof with a threaded socket, similar to that embodied in the fitting as shown in Figure 6 of the drawing, would not permit obtaining `a durable, hardened, threaded connection capable of fully and properly withstanding the stresses and strains set up in the club in normal usage. To form the entire iron club head of high carbon steel would greatly increase the cost of manufacture. Hence, by forming the socket fitting for the iron club heads as a separate element of high carbon steel and butt welding it to the end of the hosel of the head, results in a substantial reduction in cost of manufacture of a durable and strong head and connection to the shaft.

In Figure 7 of the drawings I have shown a modified connection between the shaft and a wood club head. In this construction, the tubular tapered metallic shaft indicated at 40, has wedged in the lower end thereof a cooperatively tapered metallic fitting 4l, spot-welded therein, with the lower end terminating substantially ush with the lower end of the shaft. The lower end of the fitting 4| is formed with a threaded socket 4la. A longitudinal duct 42 is formed in the fitting, extending from the upper end and opening into the cavity of the threaded socket for the purpose of permitting proper Iand emcient tempering of the shaft after the fitting 4l is spot-welded in place. The external lower end portion of the shaft is surrounded by a band of plastic tape, as indicated at 43, for enhancing the appearance of the club.

The wood club head, indicated at 45, is provided with a tubular portion 46, which may be a severed portion of a normal length of the club shaft as above described in connection with the construction shown in Figures 1 to 3. Mounted in the upper end of the tubular portion 46 is a fitting 48 having a cooperatively tapered shank portion 48a, spot-welded in the upper end of said tubularportion 46, and formed integrally with the shank is an enlarged flange 4Gb adapted to be seated upon the upper end of the tubular portion 46. Formed integrally with and projecting upwardly from the upper face of the flangeiis a threaded stud 46c, adapted to be connected to and disconnected from the threaded socket 4Ia of the fitting 4I, in the lower end of the shaft 40. The outer surface of the upper end of the hosel of the head and the exposed portion of the tubular member 46 is wrapped with thread as indicated at 49, in a conventional manner.

As above mentioned the threaded portions of the respective ttings are preferably hardened by heat treating and the threaded portion of the fitting 4I may be hardened simultaneously with the tempering operation performed on the shaft 40.

When the shaft is formed with a fitting as seen in Figure 7 of the drawing, the iron club heads are provided with fittings as disclosed in Figure 8 of the drawings. wherein the hosel 5D of an iron club head has butt Welded to the upper end thereof a fitting 5| having an enlarged flange 5Ia, the upper face of which terminates in an integral, upstanding threaded stud 51h. The fitting on the iron head, in all respects, except for its connection to the hosel of the head. is identical with the upper portion of the fitting of the Wood club head shown in Figure 7, and the taccepte ting on the iron head is preferably hardened for the purposes above stated.

Although I have herein shown and described certain preferred embodiments of my invention, manifestly it is capable of modification and rearrangement of parts without departing from the spirit and scope thereof. I do not, therefore, wish to be understood as limiting this invention to the precise embodiments herein disclosed, ex cept as I may be so limi-ted by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A golf club comprising a wood head hav-y ing an upstanding hosel including a downwardly tapered tubular metallic member, a downwardly tapered, tubular metallic shaft, and means for detachably connecting said head and shaft, vsaid means comprising a metallic tting formed as a sleeve telescoped over and rigidly secured on the upper end of said member of the hosel, the upper end of said sleeve projecting above said member and being internally threaded, and a cooperating metallic fitting having a shank portion tele.-A scoped and xedly secured in the lower end of said shaft, the lower end of said tting project-l ing below the end of the shaft and terminating in a threaded stud.

2. A golf clulo comprising a wood head having an upstanding hosel including a downwardly ta pered tubular metallic member, a. downwardly tapered, tubular metallic shaft, .and means for detachably connecting said head and shaft, said means comprising a metallic tting formed as a sleeve telescoped over and rigidly secured on the upper end of said member of the hosel, the bore tion thereto, the upper end of said sleeve projecting above said member and being internally threaded, and a cooperating metallic fitting hav- 3. A golf club comprising a wood head having i an upstanding hosel including a downwardly tapered tubular metallic member, a Adownwardlsr tapered, tubular metallic shaft, and means for detachably connecting said head and shaft, said U35 of the sleeve being tapered correspondingly toy said member to insure a snug and firm connecmeans comprising a metallic titties formed as o Sleeve teleseoped over and rigidly secured on the upper end of said member of the 110561, the upper end of said sleeve projecting above said member and being internally threaded, and a cooperating metallic fitting having a shank portion tapered correspondingly to and telescoped and xedly secured in the lower end of said shaft, the lower end of said fitting projecting below the end of the shaft and terminating in a threaded stud.

VLl. A golf club comprising a wood head having an upstanding hosel including a downwardly tapared tubular metallic member, a downwardly tapered, tubular metallic shaft, and means for detachably connecting said head, and Shaft, Said means comprising a metallic ntting formed as a sleeve telescoped over and rigidly secured on the upper end of said member of the hosel, the upper end of said sleeve projecting above said member and being internally threaded, and a cooperating metallic tting having a shank portion telescoped and fixedly secured in the lower end of said shaft, the lower end of said tting projecting below the end of the shaft and terminating in a thread ed stud, and a flange above the stud adapted to seat against the upper end of the sleeve when the head and shaft are connected together.

FRANK PRITCHARD.

BEFERENCES ClTED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNTE) STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3170691 *Jul 23, 1962Feb 23, 1965Pritchard Frank CGolf club shaft and hosel connector
US3176987 *Sep 27, 1962Apr 6, 1965Johnston Frank LGolf club including means for aligning the shaft, hosel and striking face
US3204966 *Mar 21, 1963Sep 7, 1965Andrew SaytarGoal apparatus for field hockey game
US3516697 *Feb 20, 1969Jun 23, 1970Raymar IncConnector for tubular members
US3873090 *Dec 17, 1973Mar 25, 1975Thompson Stanley CGraphite shaft connection to golf club hosel
US3934875 *Feb 14, 1974Jan 27, 1976James Leland EastonHockey stick
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US5465959 *Dec 16, 1994Nov 14, 1995Advanced Composite Designs Co., Ltd.Golf club body made of composite material and having a bent front section
US5513844 *Nov 29, 1994May 7, 1996Goldwin Golf U.S.A., Inc.Golf club fitting apparatus
US5863260 *Jun 11, 1997Jan 26, 1999Butler, Jr.; Joseph H.Device-coupled assembly and device used therewith
US6743116 *Aug 20, 2002Jun 1, 2004Kurt C. WilburSeparable-shaft golf club
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US7347791Sep 11, 2006Mar 25, 2008Louis ObermanSeparable golf club system and methods of use
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US8046899Dec 17, 2010Nov 1, 2011Club-Conex, Inc.Universal shaft and head connector
US8545344 *Mar 13, 2012Oct 1, 2013Acushnet CompanyInterchangable shaft and club head connection system
US8562454Mar 1, 2011Oct 22, 2013Club-Conex, Inc.Golf shaft connector with shaft insertion
US20120225730 *Mar 13, 2012Sep 6, 2012Noah De La CruzInterchangable shaft and club head connection system
WO1996016704A1 *Nov 29, 1995Jun 6, 1996Goldwin Golf Usa IncGolf club fitting apparatus and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/306
International ClassificationA63B53/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63B53/02
European ClassificationA63B53/02