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Publication numberUS2463161 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 1, 1949
Filing dateSep 22, 1945
Priority dateSep 22, 1945
Publication numberUS 2463161 A, US 2463161A, US-A-2463161, US2463161 A, US2463161A
InventorsGrenier Francis C Du, Frank B Perri
Original AssigneeBlanche E Bouchard
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin separator
US 2463161 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 1, 1949. F. c. DU GRENIER ET AL COIN SEPARATOR Filed Sept. 22, 1945 3nventora:

(Ittoruegs- V Patented Mar. 1, 1949 COIN SEPARATOR Francis 0. Du Grenier, Havel-hill, and Frank .B. Perri, Groveland, Masa; said Perri assignor to Blanche E. Bouchard, Havel-hill; Mass.

Application-September 22, 1945, Serial No. 617;!390

9 Claims.

This invention relates to "coin separators or classifiers, as commonly used on coin-operated vending machines of all sorts, and particularly for machines vending articles of different value for coins of different value.

It has been the customary practice" in such machines heretofore to provide separate coin openings or slots, and coin chutes for each value of coin used. This hascaused unnecessary complexity and expense making such machines and unnecessary difficultyinoperating them,'particularly because of the careless operator who is unable to always-get the proper'coin in the proper slot. In such case the coin is returned to the operator, who then may report the machine as out of order, requiring unnecessary inspection, or servicing, or he may seek to make the machine work or damage it bythe application of unnecessary or improper force. In line withthe efiort to make coin-operated machines asfoolproof as possible, we have devised mechanism which permits one coin opening to be used for all values of coins, and which separates each coin according to its value, and directs it into its proper coinchute for subsequent testing and use in operating the machine.

In operation, this mechanism separates coins according to their size ordiameter, the largest coin being first separated out, then the next largest, and so on until all sizes have been disposed of. For purposes of illustration, the device is shown as used with quarters, nickels and dimes, but it is to be understood that the device may be used with half dollars or'pennies'also, as well as the coins of foreign countries.

Before explaining in'detail the present invention it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application -to the details of construction and arrangement of "parts illustrated in the accompanying drawings, sinceithe invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced or carried out invarious ways. Also it is tobe underst-ood'that the phraseolcgy or terminology employed herein isfor the purpose of description and not oflimitation, and it is not intended to limit the invention claimed herein beyond the'requirementspf the prior art.

Further objects and advantages "will appear in the following'specification, in connection withthe accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a fragmentary view, in elevation, of coin'separatingmechanism embodying the'invention;

Fig. 2 is a plan view thereof;

Fig. B'is arear'view; and

Fig. 4 is a vertical section taken on the-line i -t of Fig. 1.

In thedrawings, l0 represents a back plate or rear wall-forming element (which may be the side casing of the'vendingmachine) and mounted over it but spaced apart from it by suitable steps H and attached thereto as by screws I2 is front plate I i forming the front wall for the coinseparating mechanism. A coin'openingor slot i5 is provided which leads into the coin chute it formed by suitable flanges or sides 1-! preferably formed or mounted on back plate 10, in any suitable manner, as by welding, coin slot l5 and'chute it being 'large enough to receive all coins with which the mechanism is to operate. Coin chute lsipreferably slopes downwardlyand its angle of inclination and its length is determined by the weight of the various coins to be used, so that each coin may acquire sufficient momentum on beinginsertedinto coin slot 1'5, to operate the coin-separating devices 25} hereafter described. Each coin separator 20 diifers in size, weight and proportions according to the coin it is designed to separate out, and comprises a tiltable member suspended for oscillating or swinging movement outwardlyand inwardly on an axis parallel to the bottom wall I! of coin chute l6. For this purpose each separator 20 has a short shaft22 extending perpendicularly through it at its top shank 2| which constitutes its axis of oscillation, in which it is pivotally mounted in bearings '23 preferably provided on the back of back plate Ill by an adjustable bracket 24. Top shank 2! of each separator 20 then extends forwardly beyond coin chute l6 and then turns to the left into side shank 25 which extends parallel to coin chute 16 for a distanceapproximately equal to the length of top shank 2|, and then turns downwardly into down shank 26 for a distance slightlyless than the diameter of the coin the separator 20 is desi ned to separate out, and then carries on its bottom end a shelf 27 which extends inwardly into coin chute i6 and forms the bottom wall I! thereof for the extent of the length of shelf 21. By this arrangement it will be seenthat shelf 21 is offset or spaced downwardly of the coin chute l6 and in staggered relation from the top shank 2|. It will be understood that suitable apertures are cut into front plate I4 to provide space for each separator 20 to extend over and through plate 14 into coin chute l6. In the particular embodiment of the invention herein shown, the first coin separator MA on coin chute I6 is designed to separate out quarters (25) and the distance ll of chute l6 and thus permit the quarter to drop into quarter chute 30, where it is tested by several coin detecting devices, and, if passed, is carried into the coin-controlled mechanism 'of the vending machine. It will be understood that quarter chute isformed by a suitable flange 3| welded or soldered to back plate In.

The second or nickel separator 20B is similar in all respects to the first coin separator 20A, except that it is smaller in size, and is so adjusted and proportioned in weight and balance that the momentum of a nickel passing down coin chute IE will cause the nickel to strike the bottom edge of top shank 2|, tilting separator 20B, and thus lift its shelf 21 out of alinement with the bottom wall l! of chute l6, and thus permit the nickel to drop into nickel chute 32, where it will be tested by coin-detecting devices and thence be carried into the coin-controlled mechanism of the machine. In this instance nickel chute 32 preferably passes through and behind back plate Ill through a suitable aperture 33 provided therein.

Having separated out quarters and nickels, only dimes are left to pass into dime chute 34, formed by a flange 35 on back plate Ill and no separator for dimes is necessary. It will be understood that the usual coin-detecting devices are also provided for the dimes, and pennies or slugs will be rejected thereby.

In operation, of course, dimes will by-pass both coin-separators 29A and B, and nickels will bypass the quarter separator 20A. It will be seen, therefore, that the coin separators acting on the diameter of the'coin, rather than its weight or other characteristic thus provide a simple, accurate, and rugged means of separating coins for coin-operated machines vending articles of different value for coins of different value.

We claim:

1. A coin separating mechanism, including an inclined chute down which coins of different value and diameter are adapted to roll, a tiltable member pivoted on an axis parallel to the bottom Wall of said chute, said axis extending longitudinally "of said chute having an arm extending over the top of said coin chute and in the path of a rolling coin therein, and carrying on its lower end a shelf in staggered relation from said arm and forming a removable part of the bottom wall of said chute and adapted to be tilted by coins of one diameter to cause such coins to pass into a separate chute, and to pass all coins of smaller diameter into another chute.

2. A coin separating mechanism, includin an part of the bottom wall of said chute, each member being adapted to be tilted by a coin of different and successively diminishing diameter to cause coins of different diameter to pass into separate chutes.

3. A coin separating mechanism, including an inclined chute down which coins of different value and diameter are adapted to roll, a tiltable member having an arm extending over the top of said coin chute and in the path of a rolling coin therein and carrying on its lower end a shelf in staggered relation from said arm and forming a removable part of the bottomwall of said'chute, the distance between the underside of said arm-which extends over the top of said chute and the bottom wall of said chute being slightly less than the diameter of the coin it is designed to separate, whereby said member will be tilted by coins of said diameter to cause such coins to pass into a separate chute, and to pass all coins of smaller diameter into another chute.

4; A coin separating mechanism, includin an inclined chute down which coins of different value and diameter are adapted to roll, a pluing an arm extending over the top of said coin chute and in the path of a rolling coin therein and carrying on its lower end a shelf in staggered relation from said arm and forming a removable part of the bottom wall of said chute, the distance between the underside of said arm which extends'over the top of said chute and the bottom wall of said chute being slightly less than the diameter of the coin it is designed to separate, said members being adapted to be tilted by coins of successively diminishing diameter, whereby coins of different diameters are caused to pass into separate chutes.

5. A coin separating mechanism, includin an inclined chute down which coins of different value and diameter are adapted to roll, a tiltable member pivoted on an axis parallel to the bottom wall of said chute, said axis extending lon gitudinally of said chute, and having an arm extending over the top of said coin chute and in the path of a rolling coin thereinand carrying on its lower end a shelf spaced downwardly of said coin chute in staggered relation from said arm forming a removable part of the bottom wall of said chute, and adapted to be tilted by coins of one diameter to cause such such coins to pass into a separate chute, and to pass all coins of smaller diameter into another chute. 6. A coin separating mechanism, including an inclined chute down which coins of different value and diameter are adapted to roll, a plurality of tiltable members successively disposed along said chute, each pivoted on an axis parallel to the bottom wall of said chute, said axis extending longitudinally of ,saidchute and each having an arm extending over the top of said coin chute and in the path of a rolling coin therein and carrying on its lower end a shelf spaced downwardly of said coin chute in staggered relation from said arm, and forming a removable part of, they bottom'wall of said chute, each member being adapted to be tilted by a coin of different and successively diminishing diameter to cause coins of different diameters to pass into separate chutes.

7. A coin separating mechanism, including an inclined chute down which coins of difierent value and diameter are adapted to roll, a tiltable member pivoted on an axis parallel to the bottom wall of said chute, having an arm extending into the top of said coin chute and in the path of a rolling coin therein, and carrying on its lower end a shelf spaced downwardly of said coin chute in staggered relation from said arm and forming a removable part of the bottom Wall of said chute, the distance between the underside of said arm which extends into the top of said chute and the bottom wall of said chute being slightly less than the diameter of the coin it is designed to separate, whereby said member will be tilted by coins of said diameter to cause such coins to pass into a separate chute, and to pass all coins of smaller diameter into another chute.

8. A coin separating mechanism, including an inclined chute down which coins of difierent value and diameter are adapted to roll, a tiltable member pivoted on an axis parallel to the bottom Wall of said chute, said axis extending longitudinally of said :chute, and having an arm extending into the top of said coin chute and in the path of a rolling coin therein, and carrying on the downward end of said arm a downwardly extending shank, in turn carrying on its lower end a shelf spaced in staggered relation from said arm and forming a removable part of the bottom wall of said chute, and adapted to be tilted by coins of one diameter to cause such coins to pass into a separate chute, and to pass all coins of smaller diameter into another chute.

9. A coin separating mechanism, including an inclined chute down which coins of difierent value and diameter are adapted to roll, a tiltable member pivoted on an axis parallel to the bottom wall of said chute having an arm extending into the top of said coin chute and in the path of a rolling coin therein, and carrying on the downward end of said arm a downwardly extending shank in turn carried on its lower end a shelf spaced in staggered relation from said arm and forming a removable part of the bottom wall of said chute, the distance between the underside of said arm which extends into the top of said chute and the bottom wall of said chute being slightly less than the diameter of the coin it is designed to separate, whereby said member will be tilted by coins of said diameter to cause such coins to pass into a separate chute, and to pass all coins of smaller diameter into another chute.

FRANCIS C. DU GRENIER. FRANK B. PERRI.

REFERENCES CITED Name Date Davis Aug. 17, 1915 Number

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1150254 *Mar 5, 1910Aug 17, 1915George H DavisCoin-operated signaling device.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3736769 *Jul 1, 1971Jun 5, 1973Union Carbide CorpCooling device
US4263924 *Nov 2, 1978Apr 28, 1981U.M.C. Industries, Inc.Coin separating device
US5346047 *May 26, 1993Sep 13, 1994Kabushiki Kaisha Nippon ConluxCoin processing apparatus
US5468181 *Jun 20, 1994Nov 21, 1995Kabushiki Kaisha Nippon ConluxCoin processing apparatus
EP0004263A2 *Dec 8, 1978Oct 3, 1979National Rejectors Inc. GmbHCoin separator for coins of different value
Classifications
U.S. Classification194/337, 453/5, 194/346
International ClassificationG07F5/06
Cooperative ClassificationG07D3/00, G07D3/04
European ClassificationG07D3/04, G07D3/00