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Publication numberUS2463257 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 1, 1949
Filing dateJun 25, 1947
Priority dateJun 25, 1947
Publication numberUS 2463257 A, US 2463257A, US-A-2463257, US2463257 A, US2463257A
InventorsFox Martin
Original AssigneeSeng Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Resilient mounting means for tilting chairs
US 2463257 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 1, 1949. M. FOX 2,463,257

RESILIENT MOUNTING MEANS FOR TILTING CHAIRS Filed June 25, 1947 v 3 Sheets-Sheet l March 11, 1949. M ox 2,463,257

RESILIENT MOUNTING MEANS FOR TILTING CHAIRS Filed June 25, 1947 5 Sheets-Sheet 2v IIILII'IIIWIIIIIIIIIIIILE March 1, 1949. M. FOX 2,463,257-

RESILIENT MOUNTING MEANS FOR TILTING CHAIRS $0, WMMWW Patented Mar. 1, 1949 RESILIENT MOUNTING MEANS FOR TILTING CHAIRS Martin Fox, Chicago, 111., assignor to The Song Company, a corporation of Illinois Application June 25, 1947, Serial No. 756,837

4 Claims. 1

This invention relates to chair irons for swivel chairs wherein the back member and seat are resiliently mounted.

The primary object of the invention is to provide a chair iron of simplified construction, wherein lost-motion connections are avoided and the seat member is provided with a cushioned support in addition to the usual spring-held support.

A further object of the invention is to reduce the number of pivotal connections, so that there is less chance for wear to occur and squeaks to develop.

The invention is illustrated in a preferred embodiment in the accompanying drawings, in Which Figure 1 is a side elevational View of an oiiice chair equipped with the improved chair iron; Fig, 2 is a fragmentary front elevational View of the chair; Fig. 3 is a plan sectional view, taken as indicated at line 33 of Fig. 1; Fig. 4 is a perspective view of the cushion member; and Fig. 5 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view, taken as indicated at line 4-4 of Fig. 3.

In the embodiment illustrated, a threaded post 6 is adapted to fit in a height adjusting nut I mounted in a chair base 8. A head 9 is of U-shaped cross section and is riveted to a bracket 10 which is fixed to the top of the post 6. The head has a pair of forwardly extending arms which make a hinge connection, as indicated at H, with a bracket i2 which is adapted to be secured to the front portion of the seat member I3.

A bell crank member i4 is pivotally connected to the head 9, as indicated at i5, and has a downwardly extending bifurcated arm 16 which is urged rearwardly by compression springs l'i whose tension may be adjusted by a bolt l8 having its head secured in an upwardly extending portion of the head 9 and is provided at its other end with a knob H9.

The bell crank also has a rearwardly extending arm 26, to which is pivotally connected at 2| a back-supporting bracket 22. The bracket has a forwardly extending arm 23 which is bifurcated and engaged by an adjusting screw 24 which makes a threaded connection with the crank arm 29 and is provided with a hand knob 25.

A block of rubber-like material 26 is surmounted by a metal cross bar 21 which is adapted to be secured to the rear portion of the seat member 53 by screws 28. A pair of studs 29, with heads at opposite ends, extend loosely through holes 39 in the cushion member 26 and through the crank arm 29 and the cross bar 21. These studs prevent the rear portion of the seat member from being lifted away from the chair iron. However as best shown in Figs. 1 and 5, the rear portion of the seat member rests on the yielding cushion and in addition to the springiness provided by the springs H the rear portion of the seat member is further cushioned by the member 25.

When the chair iron is installed in a chair, a toggle-like leverage is set up between the seat member it, the head 9 and the rearwardly extending crank arm 20. As the pivotal connecticns at H and B5 are fixed, a yielding connection is needed at the rear of the seat member. The block of rubber-like material 26 is sufficient to accommodate that slight movement.

The foregoing detailed description is given for clearness of understanding only, and no unnecessary limitations should be understood therefrom, for some modifications will be obvious to those skilled in the art.

I claim:

1. A chair iron comprising: a post having a fixed head extending forwardly and provided with a front hinge connection for a seat member; a bell crank member pivctally connected to the rear portion of said head and having a downwardly extending arm and a rearwardly extending arm; spring means on said head urging said downwardly extending arm rearwardly; and a cushion member disposed between said rearwardly extending crank arm and the rear portion of the seat member.

2. A device as specified in claim 1, in which the cushion member comprises a block of rubber-like material.

3. A device as specified in claim 1, in which the cushion member comprises a block of rubber-like material surmounted by a metal cross bar adapted to be secured to the rear portion of a seat member, and loose fastening means are provided extending through the rearwardly extending crank said cushion member and said cross bar.

4. A chair iron comprising: a post having a fixed head extending forwardly and provided with and a block of rubber-like material mounted on 10 the top of said rearwardly extending crank arm and adapted to support the rear portion of the seat member.

MARTIN FOX.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,354,736 Boerner Aug. 1, 1944 2,441,251 Raitch May 11, 1948 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 482,529 Great Britain Mar. 31, 1938

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2354736 *Jan 24, 1942Aug 1, 1944Automatic Products CompanyChair iron
US2441251 *Jun 21, 1943May 11, 1948Seng CoChair iron for tilting seats
GB482529A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2845992 *Mar 19, 1956Aug 5, 1958Cramer Posture Chair Company ITilting unit for swivel chair
US3421727 *May 3, 1966Jan 14, 1969Doerner Products Co LtdPost lock for chair control
US4076308 *May 19, 1977Feb 28, 1978Wilkhahn, Wilkening & HahneChair
US4191355 *Jun 15, 1978Mar 4, 1980Faull James KRocker fixtures
US4575150 *Apr 13, 1984Mar 11, 1986Simodow Manufacturing Ltd.Suspension arrangement for a tilting chair
US4652050 *Jan 11, 1984Mar 24, 1987Herman Miller, Inc.Chair tilt mechanism
US4653806 *Dec 21, 1984Mar 31, 1987Mauser-Waldeck AgPivotally and slidably connected cantilevered swivel seat
US4752101 *Jun 12, 1987Jun 21, 1988Allsteel Inc.Tilt control arrangement for office furniture chair
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/300.5, 297/300.7, 297/303.5, 248/578
International ClassificationA47C3/026
Cooperative ClassificationA47C1/0246, A47C7/443, A47C7/441
European ClassificationA47C1/024D, A47C7/44A, A47C7/44D