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Publication numberUS2463507 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 8, 1949
Filing dateJun 15, 1945
Priority dateJun 15, 1945
Publication numberUS 2463507 A, US 2463507A, US-A-2463507, US2463507 A, US2463507A
InventorsBarclay Robert E
Original AssigneeVail Mfg Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Staple hammer
US 2463507 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

` March 8, 1949.

R. g. BARCLAY STAPLE HAMMER l 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June l5, l-345l elw, SS@

March 8, 1949. R. E. BARCLAY 2,463,501

STAPLE HAMMER Filed June 15, 1945 l 2 Smets-sheet 2 raf/em.'

Patented Mar. 8, 1949 STAPLE HAMMER Robert E. Barclay, Chicago, Ill., assignor to Vail Manufacturing Company, Chicago, lll., a corporation of Illinois Application June 15, 1945, Serial No. 599,553

11 Claims. l

The invention relates to a manual implement for feeding and driving staples, tacks, or other fasteners, usually in strip form, and is adapted for operation in the manner of a hammer to drive the staples, tacks, or the like, into wood or other penetrable material.

It is the primary object of this invention to devise, for the purpose mentioned, an implement which is inexpensive, simple, and sturdy in construction and dependable in operation. In accomplishing this end I utilize a minimum of working and moving Iparts, all of which may be of rugged design. The construction is accordingly light in weight and serviceable over a long period of years.

These and other objects of my invention, as will hereinafter appear, are attainable by a construction of which a certain preferred embodiment is set forth in the accompanying drawings, where- 1n;

Figure 1 is a side elevation of the implement in its entirety, with the enclosing casing therefor shown in longitudinal section;

Fig. 2 is a horizontal section, taken on line 2-2 of Fig. l;

Fig. 3 which is a detail in vertical section through the casing, shows the enclosed head end of the implement in side elevation;

Fig. 4 is a central vertical section of the head end of the implement, taken on line 4 4 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a transverse section taken on line 5-5 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 which is a transverse section taken on line I--B of Fig. 4 omits from the showing the casing in which the working parts are enclosed; and

Fig. '7 is a view in perspective of the driver head per se.

The present implement comprises a lever swingingly mounted upon a head carried by a hollow handle in which is provided a magazine for holding a supply of staples or other fasteners; it comprises also means for automatically feeding the staples or fasteners into driving position relative to a driver which is connected with the lever, the lever being released by impact when a blow is struck, to advance with high velocity to force each staple or fastener successively into the work. While the invention as illustrated and described is referred to as an implement for driving substantially U-shaped staples, it is to be understood that it may, with slight modification, feed and drive fasteners of other types, such as tacks, brads, nails, or the like. Throughout the spec- 2 ication and claims therefore, the term staple is used to indicate broadly all forms of pointed fasteners which may be driven to position by the implement of my invention.

I utilize an exterior casing A of channel form which in the handle region is slotted to define a pair of spaced walls I0 and ll, appropriately configured for comfort in handling and use. These walls enclose between them a pair of plates I2 and I3 (see Fig. 5) which are tted to a bar B constituting a core formed in its upper region with a longitudinal slot I5 dened by walls I6 which are inset from the base of the core. The core plates I2 and I3 extend vertically for the full height of the core and slightly beyond where inturned flanges I1 are provided to define between them a slot I8. The parts thus far described may be interconnected, some or all of them, by a plurality of fastening elements such as cross pins I9 and screws 20.

In the handle region the casing walls are extended upwardly beyond the core plates and then slightly inwardly to define between them a wide slot which is bordered by shoulders wherein may be seated a closure 25 in the form of a plate which is hinged to the casing top, at 26, toward the head end of the implement. The opposite end of this closure plate is extended to the handle extremity and then downwardly, where it is formed with a nose 28 adapted to engage with a recess in the handle end, after the manner of a detent, so as to hold the closure plate releasably in place.

The staples s to be used with the present implement are desirably arranged in a row, releasably connected together and adapted to straddle the core walls I6, legs down. A channeled follower block 30 is adapted to ride along upon the core walls behind the endmost staple, a flat spring 3l being connected to the follower whereby to maintain it with tension against the staples. In some such kway the staples may be fed forwardly toward the head end of the implement where they are driven, one at a time, into the work.

The mechanism thus far described is generally similar to that which is set forth in my pending application, Serial No. 491,441, filed June 19, 1943, granted Dec. 16, 1947, as Letters Patent of the UnitedStates No. 2,432,853. From this point on the description is concerned with features of construction which I regard as new and special to this invention.

The core bar which continues for the major portion of the length ofthe implement termin-ates at its forward end in an upstanding and outstanding head wall 35 adapted to abut end 3 anges 36 of a head unit C which carries the operating mechanism. As by means of screws 31 the head unit is secured xedly to the head wall of the core bar B which is the back bone of the handle. The head unit comprises a lower block 40 with sides partly inset (see Fig. 6) to align with the core walls I6 whereby to form a staple guideway in continuation therewith; a shorter upper block 4l having a forwardly extending ledge 42 adjacent its bottom, the rear end of this block terminating at a point remote from the abutment wall of the core bar; and a pair of interconnecting side plates 43 tted alongside the upper and lower blocks, and extending rearwardly of the former to define between them a chamber 44 only open at the top. These plates at their rear endsv carry the outturned flanges 36 whereby connection is made to the core bar. The spring 3| which is extended forwardly through a slot 45 in the abutment wall of the core bar, is coiled within the chamber 44 around a cross bolt 46 to which it is connected.

At the end of the head unit is aixed an anvil plate 50 formed on its inner face with a vertical guideway 5l through which the staples s are successively fed preliminary to being driven, feet first, into the work. The anvil plate is'preferably formed integral with the upper block 4I. The anvil guideway lies at the forward end of the core guideway through which the staples are advanced longitudinally of the handle. A driver 52 is provided to move in a straight line through the Vertical guideway from atop position just above the endmost staple (see Fig. 4) to a bottom position (see Fig. 3) wherein the staple is ejected from the slot. This driver which may be in the form of a flat steel blade is fitted at its upper end with a weighted head D to which it may be connected as by means of a screw 55 passing through a lock washer 56 and an opening in the driver blade to enter a threaded socket 51 in a body 58 which, as shown best in Fig. 7, is formed with a pair of forwardly extending flanges 59, one lying adjacent each narrow edge of the driver blade. Extending outwardly from the flanges is a pair of aligned trunnions 60, and above the flanges, extending rearwardly thereof, is carried a weighted top 6| to augment the power of the driver when operated. The upper end of the driver blade desirably abuts the top so as to receive thrust therefrom.

The driver is pivotally and` sldably connected with a lever E, which, as shown, is formed of duplex arms interconnected by a pivot pin 66 which is extended through the upper block 4l and side plates 43. The duplex arms of the lever `are further interconnected by a pin 61 near their free ends, thin pin being disposed below the overhanging weighted top of the driver head and above the ledge 42 of the block 4I. Each of the lever arms is formed with a slot 68 elongated in a direction away from the lever axis and located in the region of its free end to receive one of the trunnions 60. In its oscillations, the lever will transmit vertical reciprocatory movements to the driver through the sliding connection thus afforded by the slots 68 wherein the trunnions 60 are sldably fitted.

The lever is normally sustained in an upward position, counter to gravity, as by means of a compression spring 10 whose upper end is engaged with the cross pin 61 between the lever arms. The lower end of this spring may Ybe seated within a socket 1I. that is provided on the y forward ledge 42. The spring will compress, as required, when the lever is swung downwardly (see Fig. 3), but after impact with the work will expand to restore the lever E to its upper position, the driver also in this movement being raised to its initial position ready for the next operation.

I employ with the present staple driver and lever a striker F having a nose 'I5 joined' to the ends of duplex rocker arms 'I6 which are pivoted to oscillate upon a cross pin 'Il which extends transversely through the lower block 40 of the head unit at a point which is relatively close to its lower edge. The striker nose normally is projected slightly forwardly and below the head unit to occupy a pilot position in which it will engage the work in advance of the head unit itself when the staple lever is operated. The rocker arms, at their rearward ends, make connections 'i8 with the lower ends of a pair of links 'I9 whose upper ends are pivotally joined at to the lever arms 55 at a point medially4 of their length. With each operation, the striker whose normal position is as indicated in Fig. l, will, upon impact with the work, beA

rocked upwardly at its forward end, thereby exerting a down pull through the link connections to swing the lever downwardly.k The driving motion thus imparted to the hammer is;

initiated by the force transmitted from the yielding striker, and is at once supplemented by the force of momentum consequent upon unyielding impact of the head unit with the Work. Each such operation produces a powerful down thrust upon the driver which acts to displacev the endmost staple and drive it into the work. The end of an operative cycle is reached when the lever, in response to tension of the spring 10, is raised upwardly to its limit against a stop plate formed with a longitudinal slot 86 through which is extended a locking screw 8.1 which secures it in a desired position of adjust-v ment.

The hammer operating mechanism herein described is advantageous in various respects. All parts are in line with the center of the implement or duplicated on opposite sides thereof in an exactly balanced relationship so as to attain. the

maximum efficiency in movement. The power force is transmitted through a duplex lever F of the drst class (the striker) in link connection with a duplex lever E of the third class. The fulcrum point of the striker and/0r the power point of the lever may obviously be located within fairly wide limits relative to the lengths of these two levers, according to whatever movement ratio is found to be most satisfactory for a particular purpose. Regardless of the exact proportions and sizes which may be selected, the mechanism remains compact and sturdy, and may be depended upon to perform satisfactorily over an extended period ofservice.

It will be noted that the present staple hammer comprises a core bar on one end of which is, formed a head wall 35 that extends both laterally and upwardly; also in abutting relation with this head wall are flanges 38 outturned from, the ends of side plates between which are mounted upper and lower blocks forming the head end oi the implement. The side plates, by reason of the screws 2B, pivot pins 66 and 11, and cross bolt 46, interconnect the two head blocks immovably. This .head unit is applicable to or detachable from the end of the core barthereby promoting convenience in manufacture, assembly,

and possible replacement or repair. In such a construction the outer casing A which serves primarily to enclose the working parts, may be removed whenever occasion may require without disturbing any of the operating parts which in such circumstances are then exposed for such attention as may be necessary.

Iclaim:

1. A stapling implement comprising a reciprocal staple driver, a guideway for confining the driver movements to a straight line, a striker movable by impact with the work, an oscillatible lever in pivotal sliding connection with the driver, a link connection between the striker and lever, and a handle having a head furnishing a mounting for the driver guideway and for the striker and the lever.

2. A stapling implement comprising a lever, a striker movable by impact with the work, means connecting the striker to the lever, a handle whereon is formed a guideway i'or processional advance of staples therethrough, a head at one end of the handle comprising two parts separated to provide between them a continuation of the staple guideway, means connecting the two head parts as a unit, and means providing pivotal mountings Ifor the lever and the striker on the head.

3. A stapling implement comprising a head, a staple driver positioned in the head and movable upwardly and downwardly, a lever oi the third class fulcrumed in the head and pivotally connected with the staple driver and arranged to swing upwardly and downwardly, a work striker pivoted intermediate oi its ends in the head and having a nose movable upwardly by impact with the work, and a link pivotally connected with the said lever and with the striker in rear of the pivot thereof whereby the lever and the driver will be moved downwardly by said impact of the striker with the work.

4. A stapling implement comprising a head, a staple driver positioned in the head and movable upwardly and downwardly, a lever of the third class fulcrumed in the head and pivotally connected with the staple driver and arranged to swing upwardly and downwardly, a work striker pivoted intermediate of its ends in the head and having a nose movable upwardly by impact with the work, a link pivotally connected with the said lever and with the striker in rear of the pivot thereof whereby the lever and the driver will be moved downwardly by said impact of the striker with the work, and a spring acting to restore the driver, the lever and the work striker to their initial positions.

5. A stapling implement comprising a head, a reciprocable staple driver positioned in the head for upward and downward movement, a lever extending longitudinally of the head and pivoted at its rear end to the same and pivotally connected at its front end to the staple driver, a work striker located below said lever and pivoted intermediate of its ends to the head and having a projecting nose movable upwardly by impact with the work, and a link pivoted to the work striker in rear of the pivot thereof and to the said lever intermediate of the ends thereof, whereby the driver and the lever will be moved downwardly by impact of the striker with the work.

6. A stapling implement including a head, a staple driver positioned in the head for upward and downward movement, a lever extending longitudinally of the head and having spaced sides pivoted at their rear ends to the head at opposite sides thereof and pivotally connected at their front ends to the staple driver, 5a' -Work striker located below the lever and pivoted intermediate of its ends to said head and having spaced sides located at opposite sides of the head,

lever and the driver will be moved downwardly by said impact of the striker with the work.

7. A stapling implement comprising a handle provided with a guideway for processional' ad- Vance of staples therethrough, a head at one end of the handle composed of two parts separated to provide between them a continuation of the staple guideway, means connecting the two head parts as a unit, a staple driver positioned in the head for upward and downward movement, a lever extending longitudinally of the head and pivoted at its rear end to the same and at its front end to the staple driver, a work striker pivoted intermediate of its ends to the head and having a projecting nose portion movable upwardly by impact with the work, and a link pivoted to the rear portion of the work striker and to the lever intermediate the ends thereof whereby the lever and driver will be moved downwardly by the said impact of the striker with the work.

8. A stapling implement comprising a handle provided with a longitudinal guideway for processional advance of staples therethrough, a head aixed to the handle at the front end thereof and formed with a staple guideway in continuation of that of the handle, said head being provided with a forwardly extending ledge, a staple driver positioned in the head for upward and downward movement forwardly of the ledge, a lever extending longitudinally of the head and pivoted at its rear end to the same and at its front end to the driver, a work striker pivoted intermediate of its ends to the head vand having a projecting nose movable upwardly by impact with the work, a link connecting the rear portion of the striker with the lever, whereby the lever and the driver are moved downwardly by said impact of the driver with the work, and a spring seated upon said ledge and arranged to urge the lever and the staple driver upwardly.

9. A stapling implement comprising a handle having a longitudinal guideway for processional advance of staples therethrough, a head attached to the handle at the front end thereof and composed of upper and lower blocks and connecting side plates, the upper block terminating at a point spaced from the proximate end of the handle to provide a chamber open at the top, a staple driver positioned in the head for upward and downward movement, a lever extending longitudinally of the head and pivoted at its rear end to the same and at its front end to the staple driver, a work striker pivoted intermediate of its ends to the head and having a front projecting portion movable upwardly by impact with the work, a link connecting the rear portion of the work striker with the lever, and a spring arranged within said chamber and seated upon the head and arranged to urge the lever and the driver upwardly.

10. A stapling implement comprising a handle, a core bar located within the handle and arranged to support staples, said bar being provided at its iront end with a head wall extending outwardly and upwardly therefrom, a head having side plates provided; with outturned..flangesabutn tingtheghead wall of the core bore, means for detachably connecting the head wall and said of.. its ends to said head and having a projecting;

nose movable upwardly by impact with the work, and alink connecting the rear portion of the work striker' with the lever for moving the lever and the driver downwardly when the noseY of the work striker is moved upward-1y.

11. A stapling implement comprisingy a casing, a staple driver mounted within the casing for upward and downward movement and composed of a blade and a Aweighted head provided at its opposite sides with flanges having laterally projecting trunnions and receiving the blade between the anges, means for securing the blade to the weighted head, a lever extending longitudinally of the casing and composed of spaced sides pivoted at their rear ends within the casing and provided at their front ends with yslots receiving the said trunnions, a work striker pivoted intermediate of' its ends within the casing and having a front projecting nose portion movable upwardly by im- ROBERT E. BARCLAY.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATESv PATENTS Number Name Date 1,846,165A Vogel Feb. 23, 1932 1,970,101 Maynard Aug. 14, 1934 1,983,397 Polzer Dec. 4, 1934 2,281,232 Cavanagh Apr. 28, 1942 2,345,267 Keil Mar. 28, 1944 2,375,419 Krantz May, 8, 1945

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1846165 *Dec 16, 1930Feb 23, 1932Max VogelStapling machine
US1970101 *Jan 17, 1931Aug 14, 1934Boston Wire Stitcher CoStapling machine or tacker
US1983397 *Nov 27, 1931Dec 4, 1934Fridolin PolzerPlier type stapling machine
US2281232 *Mar 8, 1939Apr 28, 1942Boston Wire Stitcher CoFastener-applying implement
US2345267 *May 4, 1942Mar 28, 1944Signode Steel Strapping CoStapler
US2375419 *Mar 14, 1941May 8, 1945Henry A TorstensonMagazine hammer
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2645773 *Aug 19, 1950Jul 21, 1953Nat Autostitch CorpRemovable staple driver guide for staple driving implements
US2661999 *Aug 17, 1951Dec 8, 1953Arrow Fastener Co IncHammer type stapler
US2757378 *Oct 16, 1953Aug 7, 1956Arrow Fastener Co IncStapling device
US4033499 *Oct 20, 1975Jul 5, 1977Butler David JFastener applicators
US8146789 *Apr 21, 2010Apr 3, 2012Apex Mfg. Co., LtdHammer tacker
Classifications
U.S. Classification227/133
International ClassificationB25D1/00, A47J37/06
Cooperative ClassificationB25D1/005, A47J37/0694
European ClassificationB25D1/00B, A47J37/06P