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Publication numberUS2463771 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 8, 1949
Filing dateMar 8, 1946
Priority dateMar 8, 1946
Publication numberUS 2463771 A, US 2463771A, US-A-2463771, US2463771 A, US2463771A
InventorsHunz Alphonse W
Original AssigneeHunz Alphonse W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rolled tooth ratchet bar
US 2463771 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

vPatented Mar. 8, 1949 UNlTED STATES PATENT OFFICE ROLLED TDOTH RATCHET BAR Alphonse W. Hunz, East Chicago, Ind. Application March 8, 1946, Serial No. 652,842

(Cl. i4-575) 6 Claims. 1

The present invention relates to elongated toothed bars or rods of vari-ant cross section rolled from metal in such manner as to be economically made and yet relatively light in cross section and weight with adequate strength.

This invention is a continuation of my prior invention described in my co-pending patent Aapplication Serial Number 423,078 filed December 15, 1941 for a Rolled toothed bar, now Patent 2,397,965, patented April 9, 1946.

The subject matter of the present invention is directed to an elongated toothed bar or rod which is of particular utility in connection with pushing and pulling devices, particularly lifting jacks of the types disclosed in United States Letters Patent 2,266,760 and 2,361,690. In devising jacks of the types referred to one of the problems encountered is the economical manufacture of a toothed bar or angle iron. It is desired to provide an angle iron, bar, or rod having teeth so shaped that when cooperating with a ratchet, pawl or other element forming a part of the pushing or pulling device, the teeth will be self-cleaning so that they will not become readily clogged with dirt, scale, rust particles or other foreign matter which otherwise would prevent proper operation of the ratchet, pawl or other cooperating element.

Among the objects of the present invention is to provide a process for economically manufacturing a strong and rugged toothed bar, angle iron or other shape rolled preferably from high carbon steel stock and having teeth uniformly formed thereon.

A further object of the present invention is to provide different types of toothed bars or rods which have certain improved features and characteristics which facilitate the cooperation of such bars or rods with pushing and pulling devices and particularly lifting jacks.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide improved forms of toothed bars, angle irons or other shapes which are particularly suited for manufacture by an economical rolling process.

Other and further objects of the present invention subsequently will become apparent by reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein Figure 1 is a perspective view of an angle iron embodying the present invention;

Figure 2 is an enlarged front view of the device shown in Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a cross sectional view of the device shown in Figure 2 as seen in arrows along the line 3-3;

Figure 4 is a cross sectional view of the device shown in Figure 3 as seen in the direction of the arrows along the line 4 4;

Figure 5 is a front View of another embodiment constructed in accordance with the present invention;

Figure 6 is a cross sectional view of Figure 5 as seen in the direction of the arrows along the line 6 6;

Figure 7 is a cross sectional view of the embodiment shown in Figure 6 as seen in the direction of the arrows along the line `I1; and

Figures 8, 9 and 10 are cross sectional views similar to Figure 7 of further embodiments similar to Figure 7 but having different cross sectional configurations.

The present invention comprises an elongated toothed rack or ratchet bar I2 formed of suitable steel, preferably high carbon steel, which has been hot rolled to the required shape to produce a toothed bar which may be relatively light and small in cross section so that the weight of the bar is maintained at a minimum value while the strength and ruggedness are not sacrificed. The bar I2 is provided with a plurality of uniformly spaced teeth I4 which in the form shown in Figure 1 extend transversely of the angle bar I2 between angular flanges I6 and I8 which preferably are at angles less than ninety degrees to each other. In the preferred form the angle between the flanges I6 and I8 may be any value from fifty degrees up to ninety degrees, but preferably the angle should not be less than sixty-two degrees.

The toothed bar I2 preferably is formed by hot rolling a bar between two rollers. The upper roller engages and supports the outside faces 20 and 22 of the anges IB and I8 respectively and the apex surface 24 which interconnects these outer surfaces. The lower roll supports the inside surfaces 26 and 28 of the flanges I6 and I8 and the direction of the applies a series of projections to the juncture of the surfaces 26 and 28 to form the teeth I4. The lower roll in conjunction with the upper roll causes the metal of the bar at the inner apex to flow laterally and longitudinally to form a series of uniformly and longitudinally spaced teeth I4 integral with the bar and extending transversely thereof.

In rolling a bar of this type it has heretofore been found difficult to prevent irregular elongation of the bar which thereby would result in irregular and unequal spacing of the teeth I4. To

further facilitate the rolling operation, it has been found in accordance with the present invention that the side surface of a tooth i4, see Figure 3, may be at a different angle relative to a horizontal plane extending longitudinally of the bar I2 as compared to the opposite toothed side 32. It is also possible to form the top of the surface 34 at a very slight angle to the longitudinal plane of the bar to further facilitate accurate rolling of the teeth.

By reference to Figure 4 it will be noted that the angle which the sides 26 and 28 form with respect to the plane of the bottom of the teeth is a different angle from the outer faces 2i) and 22 of the flanges i8 and i8. rlhis gives greater strength to the structure. In short, the angle beam becomes about twenty per cent stronger by having the legs or flanges l 6 and I8 thicker at their outer free ends.

For example it has beenfound that a configuration generally corresponding to that shown in Figure 3 may have one side of the tooth 30 at an angle of about 120 or less whereas the opposite side 32 of the tooth is at an angle of 120 or more. The top surface 34 of the tooth has a very slight angle C which for purposes of illustration in the drawing has been exaggerated. The sur face 30 may be formed at any angle between 120 and 90. The other two surfaces 32 and 34 are arranged at angles such as indicated so as to facilitate forming the teeth by the projections on the lower roller whereby these projections will readily leave the inter-dental recesses without distortion of the formed metal of the bar or undue friction or interference with the formed teeth.

In practice the midpoints of adjacent teeth are preferably formed from one-fourth to three-quarters of an inch apart. The teeth are preferably not greater in height than three-eights of an inch, and the top of each tooth is preferably of the order of one-eighth of an inch measured along the longitudinal axis of the rod. The length of the interdental recesses at their bottoms, in a direction longitudinally of the bar, is of the order of at the height of the teeth. The increased spacing between the teeth relative to the size and mass of individual teeth facilitates hot rolling of the toothed bar since it has been found that tremendous heat on a small tooth will nre crack the tooth. The increased spacing obviates this effect. Utilizing configurations of the teeth as described, it is possible to form inter-dental recesses 38 which are substantially flat and in a common plane extending longitudinally of the bar.

By forming opposite sides of the teeth at different angles relative to the longitudinal plane of the rod, advantageous operation is obtained when the rod is used as a part of the pushing, pulling, or lifting devices of the type heretofore referred to and shown in United States Letters Patents 2,265,760 and 2,361,690.

In such apparatus a holding pawl, or ratchet member moves along the bar from one tooth to the next and in operation it automatically cleans out the dirt or other foreign matter which has lodged in the inter-dental spaces and therefore maintains the tooth bar in effective operating condition. This self-cleaning action is obtained because the bottom surface 36 of the inter-dental spaces lies in a direction extending along the longitudinal axis of the bar parallel to the plane of the front of the bar so that the pawl moves down into the inter-dental space and scrapes the least two and one half times dirt therefrom toward the adjacent tooth. The adjacent tooth having an angle A permits the pawl to remove the foreign matter.

Another embodiment of the present invention is shown in Figures 5, 6, and 7. It is apparent from the latter figure that the cross sectional configuration is one of a bar having a web or body portion 38 provided with relatively massive flanges 40 and 42. The flange 42 along its face is provided with the plurality of inter-dental spaces 44 and a plurality of teeth 46. From Figure 7 it will be noted that eacn of the teeth 46 is of a height slightly less than the distance from the bottom of the tooth or the inter-dental space 44 to the outer surface of the flange 42 so that it is contained within the confines of the ange. Each of the inter-dental spaces 44 is provided on all sides with inclined sides, the sides which form the sides of the teeth preferably being at greater angles than the other two sides. The teeth 46 preferably at their base have a transverse dimension not in excess of the cross sectional transverse dimension of the web or beam portion 38 of the bar. The side surfaces of the teeth preferably are arranged at angles to the horizontal plane of the bar in a manner similar to the angles of the teeth described in connection with the preceding embodiment illustrated in Figures 1 to 4.

Figure 8 shows a further arrangement wherein a bar is provided which has a web or body portion 43 provided with a single flange 5e. The flange 50 has its outer surface formed so as to provide teeth 52 within the confines of the flange 50 in a manner similar to corresponding teeth 46 in the preceding embodiment shown in Figures 5 to 7. The teeth 52 of the embodiment shown in Figure 8 have a maximum base dimension not in excess of the transverse dimension at the center of mass of the bar or rod.

Still another embodiment is shown' in Figure 9 where the bar has a central body portion 54 which is provided with two relatively massive flanges 53 and 56. The flange 56 in this instance is provided with walls 60 and 62 extending laterally outwardly therefrom and the outer faces of these walls 56 and 62 lie inwardly of the outer faces of the flange 56. The walls 82 and 62 are formed with centrally located teeth 58. These teeth lie within the body of the flange and within the body of the walls 50 and 62. The construction and arrangement of the teeth 58 are similar to the construction and arrangement of the teeth as described in the preceding embodiments in Figures 5 to 8.

Still another embodiment is illustrated in Figure 10 where the bar has a body portion 64 provided with a flange 66. The body 54 has a somewhat trapezoidal cross section. The outer surface of the flange 65 is provided with teeth 58 which extend between side walls 'lil and 72. The interdental spa-ces between the teeth 68 have concave bottom surfaces. The sides of the teeth 68, how# ever,.are formed in accordance with the teach ings set forth in connection with the embodiment in Figures 1 to 4.

Applicant makes reference to his copending applications Serial Nos. 652,843 and 652,844, filed March 8, 1946.

While for the purpose of illustrating and describing the present invention, certain specific forms have been shown in the drawing, it is to be understood that such other. variations are contemplated in accordance with'the teachings of the presentinvention as may be commensurate with the true spirit and scope of the invention defined in the following claims.

This invention is hereby claimed as follows:

1. A toothed bar having integral teeth in spaced relation longitudinally of the bar and integrally formed therewith, said teeth being substantially wider at the top than at the bottom in cross section transversely of the length of the bar, said teeth having tapered sides at diierent angles to the longitudinal plane of the bar, the height of the teeth at the top of said sides being approximately equal and said height being less than the length of the bottoms of the interdental recess in a direction longitudinally of the bar.

2. A toothed bar having integral teeth in spaced relation longitudinally of the bar, the inter-dental recesses having substantially flat bottom surfaces, the opposing inter-dental walls forming said recesses spreading outwardly in directions away from said bottoms, the teeth each having an altitude less than the length of the bottoms o the inter-dental recesses in a direction longitudinally of the bar.

3. A rack comprising an elongated bar of solid metal having a recess substantially longitudinally of the bar, spaced teeth formed in said recess, the length of the bottoms of the inter-dental spaces in a direction longitudinally of the bar being of the order of two and one-half times the height of the teeth, said bottoms all lying substantially in a common plane longitudinally and transversely of the bar and the inter-dental spaces being in cross section transversely of the bar wider at the top than at the bottom, said teeth having opposite sides at different angles to the plane of the bottoms of the inter-dental spaces.

4. A toothed bar having integral teeth in spaced relation longitudinally o the bar, the spacing between the adjacent teeth being relatively greater than the size of the tooth in a direction longitudinally of the bar, the tops of the teeth being at slight angles to the plane of the bar and opposite sides of the teeth being at different angles which respectively are greater than and less than one hundred twenty degrees with respect to the longitudinal plane of the bar.

5. A rack or ratchet bar of high carbon steel having opposed spaced apart flanges, said bar between the opposed anges being provided with spaced apart teeth formed integrally with the iianges, the opposed side walls of each ange being angularly disposed.

6. A rack or ratchet bar of high carbon steel having opposed spaced apart ilanges, said bar between the opposed anges being provided with spaced apart teeth formed integrally with the flanges, the opposed side walls of each flange being angularly disposed, and the opposed side walls of each flange converging toward the main body of the bar.

ALPHONSE W. HUNZ.

REFERENCES CITED UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 162,009 Baker Apr. 13, 1875 987,385 Lord Mar. 21, 1911 1,100,742 Kane June 23, 1914 1,218,021 Walther Mar. 6, 1917 1,282,349 Wolff Oct. 22, 1918 1,621,844 Klasing Mar. 22, 1927 1,659,834 Pippin Feb. 21, 1928 1,743,943 Wagner Jan. 14, 1930 1,759,481 Dougherty May 20, 1930 2,266,760 Hunz Dec. 23, 1941 2,361,690 Hunz Oct. 31, 1944 2,397,965 Hunz Apr. 9, 1946 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 4,838 Great Britain Dec. 14, 1876 247,685 Great Britain Feb. 25, 1926

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2962261 *Jul 13, 1954Nov 29, 1960Auto Specialties Mfg CoLifting jack
US3173660 *Dec 26, 1961Mar 16, 1965Universal Tool & Stamping CompHorizontal type lifting jacks
US3180619 *Dec 1, 1961Apr 27, 1965Universal Tool & Stamping CompVehicle lifting jacks
US3378307 *Jul 22, 1965Apr 16, 1968Concrete Cutting Equipment CoCircular saw for cutting concrete surfaces
US4646554 *Aug 2, 1985Mar 3, 1987Zahnradfabrik Friedrichshafen Ag.Process for the manufacture of a rack
US5129272 *Mar 14, 1991Jul 14, 1992Nutec Transmission Ltd.Continuously variable transmission
US5782138 *Dec 10, 1994Jul 21, 1998Keiper Recaro Gmbh & Co.Locking device for car seat, especially motor vehicle seats
US5913947 *Mar 27, 1998Jun 22, 1999Keiper Recaro GmbhLocking device for car seats, especially motor vehicle seats
US7222374 *May 26, 2004May 29, 2007Bell Sports, Inc.Head gear fitting system
US8020219Jul 1, 2005Sep 20, 2011Bell Sports, Inc.Strap anchor system and method
US20050262619 *May 26, 2004Dec 1, 2005Musal Michael JHead gear fitting system
US20050283885 *Jun 29, 2004Dec 29, 2005Stroud David EHelmet reinforcement system
US20070044210 *Aug 31, 2005Mar 1, 2007Bell Sports, Inc.Integrated fit and retention system
US20070157372 *Mar 12, 2007Jul 12, 2007Bell Sports, Inc.Head Gear Fitting System
US20100050324 *Mar 4, 2010Bell Sports, Inc.Height-Adjustable Fit System
WO1991010081A1 *Dec 21, 1990Jul 11, 1991Peter John Edward IrvinContinuously variable transmission
Classifications
U.S. Classification74/575, 254/108, 74/460, 74/422
International ClassificationF16H55/02, F16H55/26
Cooperative ClassificationF16H55/26
European ClassificationF16H55/26